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Commitment to Justice Conference


Panels and Presenters

Friday 9:00 A.M.

Panel #

CATEGORY and Panel Title

Panel Description

Presenter's Name
School
Individual Proposal Title

1

Friday

AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Social Justice: Linking Higher Education and Professional Practice

These papers link university coursework with professional roles in education and nursing.  The presenters will share the design of core courses, one an inter-disciplinary seminar drawing on ethics, sociology and education, that address issues of equity and justice in educational settings, and another addressing strategies to address justice issues in nursing coursework and community health nursing assignments.

SECTION A

Beth Furlong
Creighton University

Social Justice in Nursing Education and Research

Kristin Guest and Laurie Stevahn
Seattle University

Social Justice in Professional Practice

(Room E - 120)

SECTION B

John Coleman, S.J.
Loyola Marymount University

Social Justice and Education: Inter-disciplinary Conversation Between Ethics, Sociology and Education

(Room E - 346)

24

Friday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Models of Justice Courses

Sharing the goal of Observation ---> Reflection ---> Action and themes of diversity, racism, justice, and peace. Po115 examines structural inner-city poverty, militarism, and citizen organizing as a response.  PY291 demonstrated that racism in students, as shown by three measures, can be decreased over a semester.

SECTION A

Elizabeth Gardner & Larri Mazon
Fairfield University

Commitment to Justice in Jesuit Higher Education

(Room E - 116)

SECTION B

Kevin Cassidy
Fairfield University

Linking Justice and Peace: Fairfield University’s course, “Introduction to the Study of Peace and Justice.”

(Room E - 335)

28

Friday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Societal Issues Incorporation into Mathematics and Science courses

Ways in which service learning/societal issues are being incorporated into mathematics and science courses will be discussed.  Examples include a mathematics of fairness course, chemistry student outreach to junior high science classes, in-class discussion of the societal impact of chemical/biochemical research, and energy usage/needs in physics courses.

Brian Hopkins (St. Peter’s College) and Mary Lou Caspers (University of Detroit Mercy)
Societal Issues Incorporation into Mathematics and Science Courses

(Room E - 134)

31

Friday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Promoting social justice through community-based collaboration and research

Panel 31 will present the work of two Catholic universities to promote social justice through community-based collaboration and research. Boston College is a major player in a local school-community-university partnership designed to increase academic achievement and enhance the well-being of urban school children. Loyola University Chicago has engaged in innovative university-community action research and learning partnerships in multiple policy areas that positively impact local low-income communities and communities of color.

Jillian DePaul, Mary Walsh, Erik Goldschmidt, and Joseph O’Keefe
Boston College

Boston Connects: Integrating the Social Justice and Research Missions at Boston College

Phil Nyden and David H. Van Zytveld
Loyola University Chicago

The Center for Urban Research and Learning (CURL) at Loyola University Chicago

(Room E - 138)

16

Friday
AM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

Promoting and Practicing Justice through Inclusivity

This interactive session will explore inclusivity within the University environment. Given the changing demographics of both students and faculty at Jesuit institutions, creating environments that include divergent perspectives appears integral. The presenters will invite participants to reflect on relevant experiences through active engagement.

Georgie Ann Weatherby, Tina Geithner, Nancy Worsham
Gonzaga University
Promoting and Practicing Justice through Inclusivity

Thomas E. Kelly
John Carroll University

Addressing Controversial Issues in the Classrooms- Perspectives on Sound Ethical and Educational Practice

(Room E - 130)

27

Friday
AM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

A formal Relationship between Fairfield and the National Jesuit Conference’s Office for Social and International Ministries

On October 10th, 2002, Fairfield University entered into a formal alliance with this national Jesuit office. Fairfield offers support services in the areas of research, policy development and model programs. Our faculty also collaborates toward the development of a model for interdisciplinary research that would partner with grass roots practitioners and involved students. Also the university will commit one or two seminar classes to working on particular policy issues identified by the Washington office.

Richard Ryscavage, S.J., James Buss
Fairfield University

A Formal Relationship Between Fairfield and the National Jesuit Conference's Office for Social and International Ministries

British Robinson, James Stormes, S.J.
Jesuit Conference

(Room E - 227)

29

Friday
AM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

Bridging the Gaps: “Schooling” within a diverse and urban student body.

Saint Peter’s College attracts urban first-generation students and students with college educated parents. Their origins are Europe, the Middle East, Asia, Africa, the Americas and the Caribbean. They reflect a diversity of faiths. We will examine cross-generational programs that bridge the gaps reflecting our Commitment to Justice.

David Surrey, Donald Malone, and Jennifer Ayala
St. Peter’s College

Justice Education at St. Peter’s

(Room E - 228)

12

Friday
AM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

The Ignatian Charism in Education for Justice: Jesuit Scholastics Explore Foundations and Strategies for Action

Ignatian pedagogy seeks to integrate academics, student life, ministry and service through and in community awareness and global solidarity.  As Jesuit scholastics who worked at three different Jesuit universities, we will propose Ignatian-based strategies of action for justice education in the various pedagogical contexts of contemporary Jesuit higher education.

Daniel Hendrickson, S.J.
Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley
Facilitating Conversion in Jesuit Higher Education

Kevin O’Brien, S.J.
Weston Jesuit School of Theology
Discerning a Vocation to Solidarity?

Kurt Denk, S.J.
Jesuit School of Theology at Berkeley
Cultivating Responsive Solidarity

Appendix to Papers

(Room E - 241)

22

Friday
AM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

The Role of Assessment in Examining the Student Experience of Mission

This panel describes the role assessment plays in deepening our understanding of our students’ experiences of the Jesuit mission.  Two projects, an academic program utilizing service learning and an institution-wide collaboration between academic and student affairs, highlight how assessment of student experience serves to inform how we develop women and men for others.

SECTION A

Patrick Welage and Susan Namei
Xavier University

The Impact of the Academic Service Learning Semester in Nicaragua

(Room E - 342)

SECTION B

Nick Santilli, John Carroll University
Megan Gardner, University of Akron
Assessing the Student Experience: A Partnership between Academic and Student Affairs

(Room A - 202)

32

Friday
AM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

U.S. College Students and the Poor In El Salvador:  Learning Partnership.

Educators are looking for ways to characterize and measure what students are learning from community based / immersion / service learning experiences. We will outline methods and results of our longitudinal research with U.S. students studying in El Salvador.  In addition, invited Salvadorans will reflect on the meaning of solidarity. 

Kevin Yonkers-Talz, Trena Yonkers-Talz, Griselda Reyes, Julio Perez
Casa de la Solidaridad (AJCU & UCA)
A Learning Partnership U.S. College Students and the Poor in El Salvador

(Room A - 203)

42

Friday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Use of Technology in Service Learning
This panel discusses the use of information technology to help students understand issues of conflict, justice and a dialog among religions. This technology permits students to cross hostile borders through cyberspace, experiencing the values of individuals whose identities would otherwise seem alien and whose voices would remain silent.

Winston Tellis
Fairfield University
IT Education: Service Learning as an Experiential Component

(Room E - 336)

Friday 3:30 P.M.

Panel #

CATEGORY and Panel Title

Panel Description

Presenter's Name
School
Individual Proposal Title

7

Friday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Integrated, Long-Term Institutional Commitments to local communities

This panel will discuss institutional commitments on the part of three Jesuit Universities to develop sustainable connections to the local community. One is a program on Leadership Development aimed at developing initiatives on urban social justice issues. One develops projects that involve collaborative planning with community partners. And, one encourages faculty to develop community-based learning courses.

SECTION A

John Daniels
University of Detroit Mercy
Focus, Collaboration, Learning ,and Change: Howard Gray S.J. meets David Kolb working with Detroit's Homeless; Report of First Year Gains

(Room E - 120)

SECTION B

William Meinhofer
College of the Holy Cross

The Integration of Social Justice into a Holy Cross Education through Research and Teaching

(Room E - 336)

SECTION C

Pam Rector
Lorena Chavez
Loyola Marymount University 
Making Institutional Commitment to Solidarity: LMU’s Center for Service and Action

(Room E - 375)

23

Friday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Applying Justice Theory in Higher Education

In this session, various conceptualizations and applications of the theory underlying issues of justice will be discussed. Exploring justice education in contexts of undergraduate teacher education, peace and justice studies, service learning, and institutional policies among Jesuit universities, and contemporary culture, the presentations will expand the conceptualization of justice education.

Roger Bergman
Creighton University

Justice Education After MacIntyre

Joy Gordon
Fairfield University 

Justice Vs. Charity

Sharon Chubbuck
Marquette University

Critical Pedagogy and Ignatian Pedagogy: Uneasy Alliances Among the Why, the What, and the How of Social Justice

(Room E - 116)

38

Friday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Global Views of Justice in Classroom Instruction

The papers presented here explain tested teaching techniques that engage student audiences in actively thinking about global social justice in unique and engaging ways.  One technique suggests in-field investigation and immersion, the other uses films in the foreign language classroom to achieve the same end.

Dina Franceschi
Fairfield University

Horizontally and Vertically Integrating the Classroom: Interdisciplinary learning with research in the field, Nicaragua

Ali Burk
Boston College

Persecution and Protest: Active Listening in the Language Classroom

(Room E - 134)

14

Friday
PM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

Education for Justice and Hiring for Mission

This session recommends an integration of Jesuit, Catholic Mission and Justice criteria into hiring and tenure processes in Jesuit Universities.  The papers propose: 1) how to practically achieve using such criteria in hiring and tenure decisions, and 2) whether these criteria should be broadened beyond justice to the “whole person”.  The authors seek to stimulate discussion of their proposals among the participants of the session. 

Gerald Cavanagh, S.J.
University of Detroit Mercy

Hiring, Promotion and Tenure, In accord with Justice mission in a Jesuit University

(Room E - 138)

36

Friday
PM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

Getting there from here: finding paths towards social justice

There is certainly agreement that current models do not to lend themselves easily to a more just world. How do we define new models, discuss them and encourage students to wrestle with them? Panelists will discuss ways in which they have tried to address these questions.

SECTION A

Jim Koch
Santa Clara University

The Global Social Benefit Incubator- (GSBI) Creating Opportunities for a New Society

(Room E - 130)

SECTION B

Peter Bemski & Carla Guerron Montero
Regis University
Another World is Possible

Kathleen Maas Weigert & Gaspar F. LoBiondo, S.J.
Georgetown University

Domestic and Global Jesuit Connections: Education About and For a Just Global Economy

(Room E - 241)

41

Friday
PM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

Cash and Counseling

Through a groundbreaking research project entitled Cash & Counseling, the nature of care for the nation’s older adults and persons with disabilities has been dramatically changed. Cash & Counseling programs provide men and women who require Medicaid-funded personal assistance services the opportunity to direct and manage their own supportive services as well as purchase goods and services to help them live independently.

Kevin Mahoney & Casey Sanders
Boston College

Cash and Counseling

(Room E - 244)

6

Friday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Hearing and Learning from People on the Margins

Once someone has an encounter with the “other,” on a one-to-one personal level, barriers are broken down and the “other” becomes a friend.  The participants in this panel have all been involved in educational programs in the classroom and beyond that strive to do just that.  Classroom experiences may open the mind, but it is the experiential learning that takes place outside the classroom that opens the heart.   This learning occurs within both the students and those with whom they interact.  The reciprocal relationships that are formed effect the transformation of the students into people who will no longer see, hear and feel their world in the same way.

SECTION A

Kathryn League & Mary Anne Cappelleri
Loyola College in Maryland

Close Encounters in and Outside the Classroom: Opportunities for Educating Students and Promoting Civic Engagement with Persons Who are Materially Poor and Homeless.

(Room A - 202)

SECTION B

Madeline Lovell, Joe Orlando & Ruth White
Seattle University

Hospitality for the Homeless: Seattle University’s Response to Radical Compassion

(Room E - 342)

SECTION C

Suzanne MacAvoy
Fairfield University

Homelessness: Causes and Consequences

(Room E - 346)

8

Friday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Formation and Learning: From Inner Spirit to Social Justice

Fr. Kolvenbach: the work for justice is more than "disincarnate spiritualism and secular social activism."  We will offer two languages for seeing the importance of helping students develop an awareness of the interior, the in-dwelling presence of God, as a basis for their work toward social Justice.  We will also offer beginning insights about teaching students how to recognize and attend to this interior relationship.

Len Tischler
University of Scranton

Systems Theory and Interiority

T. Michael McNulty
Conference of Major Superiors of Men/Marquette University

Taking the Victims’ Side

(Room A - 203)

18

Friday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Law School Justice Programs

The presenters will discuss law school clinics and immersion programs focusing on social justice and human rights. These programs provide law students with unique opportunities to assist others through the law. The programs also implement important precepts, such as men and women for others, while instilling a lifelong commitment to justice.

SECTION A

Michael Bryce
University of Detroit Mercy
Catholic Law School Clinical Education – Furthering a Call to Social Justice

David C. Koelsch
University of Detroit Mercy

Men and Women For Others In Action: The University of Detroit Mercy Immigration Law Clinic

Andrew F. Moore
University of Detroit Mercy
Training Lawyers and Priests: Using Jesuit Formation as a Model for Legal Education

(Room E - 227)

SECTION B

Ron Volkmer
Creighton University
Justice and Jesuit Legal Education: Ways of Thinking About the "More"

Cynthia A. Mertens
Santa Clara University
Inspiring through Contact rather than Concepts:
Challenging the Mind to Change

(Room E - 228)

Saturday 9:00 A.M.

Panel #

CATEGORY and Panel Title

Panel Description

Presenter's Name
School
Individual Proposal Title

2

Saturday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Justice in Business Courses

Some view justice in business courses as an oxymoron.  Three examples are presented to dispel this image.  The first example presents how justice can be institutionalized throughout the business program, the second explores the integration of service learning, and the third explores how to maximize the effects of service learning.

SECTION A

Stu Langdon
Spring Hill College 

Institutionalization of Justice Issues in Jesuit Business Education

David Burns, Xavier University
Jane Reid, Youngstown State University

Adding Service-Learning Projects to Business Courses: Taking Advantage of the Opportunities and Avoiding Some of the Pitfalls.

(Room E - 130)

SECTION B

Mary Ann Hazen
University of Detroit Mercy

Making Connections: Integrating Service and Learning through Reflection and Action

(Room E - 342)

10

Saturday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

“A discussion about the use of information technology in service learning and the teaching of international relations"

This panel discusses the use of information technology to help students understand issues of conflict, justice and a dialog among religions. This technology permits students to cross hostile borders through cyberspace, experiencing the values of individuals whose identities would otherwise seem alien and whose voices would remain silent.

Michael Ballen & William Stover
Santa Clara University

Teaching and Learning to Live together: Interdisciplinary Use of Information Technology to Encourage International Understanding, Peace, and Justice

(Room E - 120)

13

Saturday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

From the Classroom to the Culture: Forming Students Who Make a Difference

This panel will examine three resources for justice education: (1) Jesuit liberal education, which has always been oriented to social responsibility; (2) new thinking (from Fairfield University and Universidad Centroamericana) about how to design communication programs oriented not to corporate aims but to the service of justice; and (3) an approach to making undergrad philosophical ethics "real" by having students engage street kids and at-risk high school students on such topics as friendship, virtue, and honesty.

SECTION A

Robbin D. Crabtree
Fairfield University

Agents of Consumption and Objects of Desire: The Problematic of Communication Education for Jesuit Universities

Paul Richard Blum
Loyola College in Maryland

Cultivating Talents and Social Responsibility: Aims and Means in Early Jesuit Education

(Room E - 116)

SECTION B

Brian Clayton
Gonzaga University

Ethics, Character, Stories and Service Learning

(Room E - 346)

19

Saturday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

What Oft Was Thought: Literature and Social Justice

Literature raises profound issues about human nature, values, and society.  Carefully chosen literary texts can challenge students to think deeply about issues crucial to the Jesuit vision.  This session deals with innovative techniques to incorporate justice issues in the literature classroom.

Mike Williams, S.J.
Spring Hill College

Forming a Social Conscience: Teaching John Ruskin’s Unto this Last

Daryl W. Palmer
Regis University

Seeing Through Solidarity: Shakespeare, Justice, and Freshman Literature

(Room E - 134)

37
Saturday
AM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

The Role of Course-Based Philanthropy in Formation and Learning

Our presentation proposes to describe the structure, benefits and challenges of the Xavier Philanthropy Program to the University and the community as told by the program director, faculty who have employed a philanthropy component in their courses, students who have taken a course with a philanthropy component and Mr. Roger Grein, who funds the program.

Gene Beaupre
Xavier University

The Role of Course-Based Philanthropy in Formation and Learning

(Room E - 138)

4

Saturday
AM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

A Five Year Collaborative Agreement Between Fairfield University and Universidad Centroamericana in Nicaragua

On March 15th, 2004, Fairfield University and Universidad Centroamericana in Nicaragua (UCA) signed a historic five-year collaborative agreement. What drives this agreement is a commitment to be in “right relation” to our Nicaraguan partner – a relation of equality where Fairfield’s projects and priorities in Nicaragua are developed in conjunction with UCA’s priorities.

James Bowler, S.J., Joy Gordon, & Winston Tellis
Fairfield University

A Five Year Collaborative Agreement Between Fairfield University and Universidad Centroamericana in Nicaragua

(Room E - 227)

15

Saturday
AM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

Hearing Voices on the Margins (II)

Interviews, research, and dialogue with teachers and teacher educators, adolescent inner-city youth, Mexican and Vietnamese immigrant adults, and students and youth with disabilities reveal meaningful and relevant insights for education.  Members of this panel will discuss issues raised by listening to and connecting with the voices of others.

SECTION A

Mark Storz and Karen Nestor
John Carroll University

They Call us to Justice: Listening to the voices of urban young adolescents.

Annette B. Heim
Spring Hill College
From Despondence to Hope: Advocacy for Persons with Disabilities

(Room A - 202)

SECTION B

Fr. Jeff LaBelle, S.J.
University of San Francisco 

Experiences of Ethnic Acceptance and Prejudice in English Language Learning

Priscilla Myers
Santa Clara University
Santa Clara University’s Reading Program: Our  Mission is Literacy

(Room E - 335)

20

Saturday
AM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Smart Activism: A Co-Curricular Program on the Circle of Praxis

Smart Activism is an extracurricular series of student workshops that present the circle of praxis from Social Analysis by Holland and Henriot, (Orbis, 1983).   Through a combination of lectures, discussions, and activities students are encouraged to recognize the ongoing relationship between analysis, reflection and action inherent in effective social justice work.

Julia Dowd, Mike Duffy, Lorie Ranck
University of San Francisco 

Smart Activism: a Workshop Series of Living Learning Communities at USF

(Room E - 228)

21

Saturday
AM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Working Through Discernment: The Diversity Requirement and Curriculum Review At St. Joseph’s University

Applying the Ignatian technique of ongoing discernment to the work of curriculum development, the presenters tell the still unfinished story of the diversity requirement at St. Joseph’s University. Dr. Norberg will discuss the challenges of implementing this initiative in a core that is already very requirement heavy. Dr. Greene and Fr. Brennan will offer particular examples of how the dialogue that keeps this initiative alive characterizes classes that have as their focus issues of class, race, and sexual orientation.

Loyola College in Maryland is in the process of assessing how well we “are walking the talk” regarding our Jesuit identity.  This session will offer an overview of what’s being done at Loyola and invite participants to share what’s happening at other Jesuit schools. 

SECTION A

Ann Green
St. Joseph's University
Discernment and "Diversity": Jesuit Pedagogies, Race, and Service-Learning

Tom Brennan, S.J.
St. Joseph's University
Making Mischief with Saint Ignatius: Discernment and LGBTQ Identity

Peter Norberg
St. Joseph's University
A Brief History of a Diversity Requirement at Saint Joseph's University

(Room E - 244)

SECTION B

Catherine Gugerty, SSND and Kathryn League, '05
Loyola College in Maryland

Defining “The Jesuit Difference” 

A Proposed Accreditation Process Relating to Jesuit and Catholic Identity

(Room A - 203)

30

Saturday
AM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Informing Our "Being There": Reflecting on International Immersion Experiences in Jesuit Universities

If solidarity is learned through contact rather than through concepts, international programs offer the kind of contact with the reality of injustice which becomes the catalyst for solidarity, intellectual inquiry, and moral reflection.  This session will share information about existing programs and will reflect upon various themes that have arisen.

Frank Bernt
St. Joseph’s University
Informing Our “Being There”: Reflecting on International Immersion Experiences in Jesuit Universities

Michael Malec and Dan Leahy
Boston College
Challenges and Pitfalls for Service-Immersion Trips

Roger Bergman
Creighton University
Informing Our “Being There”: Reflecting on International Immersion Experiences in Jesuit Universities

Patricia Masters
Loyola Marymount University

(Room E - 241)

Saturday 3:30 P.M.

Panel #

CATEGORY and Panel Title

Panel Description

Presenter's Name
School
Individual Proposal Title

9

Saturday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Faith and Justice in Environmental Studies

The scholarly field of Environmental Studies has emerged to address complex social and ecological issues from an interdisciplinary perspective. Unlike traditional disciplines, it incorporates explicit norms such as social equity and sustainability. Environmental Studies as a scholarly field offers distinct opportunities for promoting justice in Jesuit education through pedagogies of engagement and the praxis of solidarity. This panel will reflect on two programs integrating justice into Environmental Studies.

Lisa Newton
Fairfield University 

The Pursuit of the Commitment to Justice in Research and Teaching: The Uses of an Environmental Studies Program

Keith Warner, OFM
Santa Clara University

Faith, Ethics and Vocation Project in Environmental Studies

(Room E - 120)

25

Saturday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Africana Studies: Toward Living Together in Harmony

Our presentation will include reflections on Xavier University’s new service learning semester in Ghana, local service learning, related courses and pedagogies practiced. We will highlight (and perhaps reconceptualize) the Jesuit ethic of educating people for service. Panel members come from the fields of history, literature, and theology.

Marie Giblin and Jerry Cline-Bailey
Xavier University

Africana Studies: Toward Living Together in Harmony

(Room E - 116)

33

Saturday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Teaching for Justice:  Service-Learning and Engaged Scholarship at Jesuit Colleges and Universities

How do service-learning and “engaged scholarship” help infuse justice education within Jesuit colleges and universities? This presentation explores Jesuit service-learning models, proposes strategies for integrating service-learning throughout curricula, and discusses Boyer’s “Engaged Scholarship” paradigm, which lends itself well to “whole person” teaching and learning, justice perspectives, and community-based scholarship.

Robin Crews
Loyola College in Maryland

Teaching for Justice: The Transformation of Teaching and Learning Through Service-Learning at Jesuit Colleges & Universities

Appendix

(Room E - 134)

39

Saturday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Two-person response to Fr. Kolvenbach’s 2000 address at SCU

Two veteran faculty offer contrasting yet complementary views on the implications for Jesuit education of Peter-Hans Kolvenbach's galvanizing

"Service of Faith/Promotion of Justice" address delivered in October of 2000 at Santa Clara.  A precis of the Superior General's presentation will be provided.

Francis Morris & Joseph Feeney, S.J.
St. Joseph’s University

Two-person response to Fr. Kolvenbach’s 2000 address at SCU.

(Room E - 130)

40

Saturday
PM

RESEARCH AND TEACHING

Exploring the Boundaries of Self: Using Autobiography to Teach Courses on Identity and Culture

What happens when we bring our personal narratives to consciousness, share them and analyze them?  This panel aims to include a more salient actualization of justice in teaching through the creation and consumption of autobiographies in the classroom.  Through reflection on research and classroom experiences, the presenters will explain the use and benefits of personal narratives: to encourage students to find their authentic voices by teaching them how to combine contemplative practices, creativity and the knowledge of social justice issues.

Heather Z. Lyons
Loyola College in Maryland
Enlivening Theory and Encouraging Empathy with Autobiography in Psychology Courses on Identity and Culture: Framing Questions

Juan Velasco Moreno
Santa Clara University

Exploring the Boundaries of Self: Using Autobiography to Teach Courses on Identity and Culture

(Room E - 138)

3

Saturday
PM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

International Collaborative Relationships between Universities for Science, Justice and Education

We will describe our collaborative relationships with faculty at the University of Central America Managua.  Professor Matlock’s project is to investigate the genetic variation in giant freshwater prawns that are being developed for an aquaculture industry in Nicaragua. Professor Jackels’ project is to establish an analytical laboratory for agricultural and environmental service in Nicaragua.  She also collaborates in a partnership of UCA Managua and Catholic Relief Services Nicaragua with small scale coffee farmers to help them improve their coffee so they can obtain a fair price.

Daniel Matlock
Seattle University

Collaborative Scientific Research in Nicaragua

Susan C. Jackels
Seattle University

International collaboration for an analytical laboratory at the University of Center America Managua and for service activities with Nicaraguan small-holder coffee producers.

(Room E - 335)

11

Saturday
PM

OUR WAY OF PROCEEDING

Peace Building and Human Rights in a Changing World

Consistent with the idea of educating men and women for others, and the ideas derived from Ignatian spirituality of being free to think and dream, this panel would like to propose several steps that can be taken to strengthen peace building, social justice, and  human rights education in Jesuit Universities.

Fr. Ben Urmston
Xavier University

Interdisciplinary Dialogue on a Livable World

Matthew Berg & Richard Clark
John Carroll University

Peace-Building, Social Justice, and Human Rights: a Co-Curricular Initiative

Nyung Kim
Sogang University, Korea

Justice and Solidarity Education through Human Rights and Service Learning

(Room E - 346)

5

Saturday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Faculty Staff Immersion Experiences

In response to the call to integrate faith and justice into Jesuit higher education, several U.S. institutions have instituted faculty/staff immersion experiences in the Third World. Such experiences expose participants to the reality of poverty and injustice on the global scale, to explore ethical questions regarding the root-causes and possible solutions of these disparities, and to incorporate this reflection into the teaching, research, and learning.  In this panel Saint Joseph’s University, Seattle University, and Santa Clara University explore how immersion experiences have facilitated faculty and staff development.

Laurie Laird & Luis Calero, S.J.
Santa Clara University

Faculty and Staff Immersion Experiences in El Salvador: a key for Understanding Contemporary Jesuit Higher Education

Ann Marie Jursca
St. Joseph’s University

Saint Joseph’s University Faculty and Staff Immersion Experience Program

Joe Orlando & Mark Lester
Seattle University 

The Nicaragua Experience: Faculty and Staff Development for Mission

(Room E - 227)

17

Saturday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Educating for a Just World

One of the primary goals of a Jesuit university education is "educating for a just world." This theme is explored through three educational models: A social justice study abroad academic program, creating "justice as a vocation", and exploring social justice advocacy through reflection and action.

SECTION A

Janet Quillian
Seattle University

Formation and Learning – the International Development Internship Program (IDIP)

(Room E - 228)

SECTION B

Anna  Brown, G. Simon Harak, S.J., David Surrey
St. Peter’s College
Diary of Social Justice

(Room E - 335)

26         

Saturday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Answering Kolvenbach's Call: The Formation of Teachers and Leaders for Equitable and Just Practice in Schools

In this session, Ignatian perspectives on preparing future teachers and school leaders for educational equity and social justice will be discussed.  Using examples from an undergraduate teacher education program and a graduate educational leadership program, the presentations will elaborate on the knowledge, skills, and dispositions that signify the Jesuit difference.

SECTION A

Terry Burant, Sharon Chubbuck, Michelle McClure, and Joan Whipp
Marquette University

Deliberating about the Jesuit Difference in Teacher Education: What Dispositions should future Teachers Have in Order to reflect a commitment to Justice?

(Room E - 241)

SECTION B

Dennis Conners
Gonzaga University

Preparing School Leaders to Ensure Equity and Work Toward Social Justice

(Room E - 336)

34

Saturday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

From the Margins to the Center: Teaching Tools for the Integration of Immersion Experiences at Jesuit Universities

Our presentation is of two pedagogical tools to invite students to integrate their immersion experience into their overall education. We will first present a general curriculum to guide students involved in the immersion experience. We will then present a specific framework to guide students' ethical reflection on that experience.

Michael  Colyer & David DeCosse
Santa Clara University

From the Margins to the Center: A Proposal for Integration of Student Immersion Experiences at Jesuit Universities

(Room A - 202)

35

Saturday
PM

FORMATION AND LEARNING

Theoretical and Practice Models for Engaging the World

This panel, emerging from the experiences of the John Carroll Center for Community Service and the Regis Institute on the Common Good, looks at several models for community engagement.  Viewed both theoretically and as actual models of practice, they focus on the developmental and transformational possibilities within the student, institution, and broader communities. 

SECTION A

Paul Alexander
Regis University

Catholic Social Teaching in Dialogue: Institute on the Common Good

(Room A - 203)

SECTION B

Nick Santilli & Mark Falbo
John Carroll University

Service Learning, Volunteerism, and Beyond: The Developmental Impact of Student Engagement

(Room E - 346)

Panel Breakdown by Day and Time (Revised 8/17/05):

 

Friday A.M.

Friday P.M.

Saturday A.M.

Saturday P.M.

Totals

Formation and Learning
14 Panels

3 Panels

3 Panels

3 Panels

5 Panels

14 Panels

Research and Teaching
17 Panels

4 Panels

3 Panels

5 Panels

5 Panels

17 Panels

Our Way of Proceeding
10 Panels

3 Panels

3 Panels

2 Panels

2 Panels

10 Panels

Totals

10 Panels

9 Panels

10 Panels

12 Panels

41 Panels


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