Loyola University Maryland

Department of Classics

Current Offerings

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Classes Offered Spring 2014

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 102-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MW 4:30-5:45 p.m.- Mr. Robert Wright
A continuation of Latin 101 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 103-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.–Dr. David Jacobson
A continuation of Latin 102 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 104–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 2-2:50 a.m.–Dr. Nandini Pandey
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 103 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 333–Sallust-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m–Dr. Thomas McCreight
A close examination of the masterpiece of literary epic, with emphasis on meter, language, style, characters, and themes. A reading of about six books of the poem in the original Latin. Prerequisite: LT 104 or equivalent. Counts for: classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

Greek Courses

GK 102-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 p.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 104–Greek Literature-Section .01
Time TBD–Dr. Nandini Pandey
Prerequisite: GK103 or equivalent. A reading of select works of Greek prose and/or poetry with close attention to their language, style and literary value. May be offered in Rome. (Spring only)

Classical Civilization Courses

English Core Courses

CL/EN 213-Greek Drama-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
This course is dedicated to the study of ancient Greek tragedy and its reception.  In addition to reading the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, we will also examine how and why modern authors, directors, artists, and dancers re-imagine and retell these timeless works. Prerequisite: EN 101. Counts for: English core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor.

Messina Seminars

CL 290D-Race, Conquest, and Identity-Section .01S
MWF 9-9:50 a.m.-Dr. Thomas McCreight
A first-year Messina seminar that examines questions of race, imperialism, and cultural/ethnic identity in ancient North Africa, both before and after the Roman conquest. Students are exposed to global diversity and issues of justice, especially with reference to conquered populations, and to questions of assimilation and resistance.

CL 291-The Gladiator–Section .01S
TTH 10:50 a.m.-12:05 p.m.-Dr. Joseph Walsh
A first-year Messina seminar that uses ancient and modern texts (e.g., The Colosseum, The Roman Games: A Sourcebook) and films (e.g., Gladiator, Spartacus, The Hunger Games) to illuminate the intersection of cruelty, ideology, and entertainment in the ancient arena.