Loyola University Maryland

Department of Classics

Future Offerings

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Classes Offered Fall 2015

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 101.01-Introductory Latin I
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m. - Dr. David Jacobson
An enriched beginning course, intended for students with no previous knowledge of the language, which emphasizes grammar, syntax, vocabulary, and reading of easy passages from Latin authors. An introduction to the literature and culture of Rome. (Fall only) Counts for: classics minor

LT 102.01 -Introductory Latin II
MWF 1-1:50 p.m. - Staff
A continuation of Latin 101 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 103.01 -Intermediate Latin
MWF 12-12:50 p.m.–Staff
A continuation of Latin 102 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 104.01–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry
MWF 12-12:50 p.m.- Dr. David Jacobson
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 103 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 200.01 – Latin Sight Reading
TBD - Dr. Joseph Walsh
Reading of selected texts in Latin "at sight" or without preparation. May be repeated four times for credit. (Pass/Fail) Prerequisite: LT101 or equivalent.

LT 300.01 – Latin Prose Composition
MW 3-4:15 p.m. - Dr. Thomas McCreight
Exercises in the translation of sentences and connected passages into felicitous Latin prose. Development of knowledge of correct, idiomatic expression in written Latin. Prerequisite: LT104 or equivalent.

LT 340.01 –  Roman Comedy
MWF 12–12:50 p.m.- Dr. Robert Miola
An examination of selected plays of Plautus and Terence, along with notice of their precursors, backgrounds, and some descendants. Students study the language of the plays and also learn to appreciate them as hilarious, artful, and living theatre. Prerequisite: LT104 or equivalent.

Greek Courses

GK 101.01-Introductory Greek I
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
An enriched beginning course, intended for students with no previous knowledge of the language, which emphasizes grammar, syntax, and vocabulary through extensive reading of easy passages from Greek authors. An introduction to the literature and culture of Athens. (Fall only). Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 103.01- Intermediate Greek
MWF 9-9:50 a.m.-Staff
Consolidation of the fundamentals of grammar and syntax. Transition to reading extended passages of real Greek. May be offered in Rome. (Fall only) Prerequisite: GK102 or equivalent.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 303.01-Selected Readings Greek I
TTH TBA- Dr. Joseph Walsh
Readings in Greek at the advanced level. Topics vary according to student interest. May be repeated once for credit. Prerequisite: GK104 or equivalent.

Classical Civilization Courses

English Core Courses

CL/EN 211.01 - Classical Mythology
MWF 11-11:50 a.m. - Staff
A study of the traditional stories of the Greeks and Romans as expressed in their literature and art with an emphasis on the literature's background, value, and influence. Usually offered fall semester. Art elective for elementary education majors.

Messina Seminars

CL 292D.01 - Race, Conquest & Identity in Ancient North Africa
MWF 10-10:50 a.m. and W 11-11:50 a.m.- Dr. Thomas McCreight
A first-year Messina seminar that examines questions of race, imperialism, and cultural/ethnic identity in ancient North Africa, both before and after the Roman conquest. Students are exposed to global diversity and issues of justice, especially with reference to conquered populations, and to questions of assimilation and resistance.

History Core Courses

CL/HS 312.01 - History of Ancient Greece
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.- Dr. Martha Taylor
A study of Greece from the Bronze Age to Alexander the Great, with special attention to the development of the Greek polis or city-state and to the various constitutional, social, economic, and religious forms which this took. Prerequisite: One HS101 level course.

CL/HS 313.01 – History of Christmas
TTH 9:25-10:40 a.m.- Dr. Joseph Walsh
Is Christmas the commemoration of Jesus' birth? Or is it a pagan winter festival hiding behind a thin but deceptive veil of Christian images and ideas? Students will discover that the holiday is both of these things and a good deal more to boot. Students examine the origins and many transformations of the holiday and how the holiday has both reflected and helped determine the course of history. Topics include the Christmas tree, gift giving, the suppression of Christmas, the Nativity accounts, pagan precedents and, of course, Santa. Prerequisite: One HS101 level course.

Other

Theology Courses

CL/TH 229.01- Images of God in Scripture
TTH 12:15-1:30 p.m.- Staff
Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self-understanding in relation to God. Prerequisite: TH201

CL/TH 229.02 - Images of God in Scripture
TTH 3:05-4:20 p.m.- Staff
Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self-understanding in relation to God. Prerequisite: TH201

CL/TH 347.01 - Jesus and the Gospels
MWF 11-11:50a.m.-  Dr. Rebekah Eklund
Students examine a variety of issues surrounding the portrayal of Jesus in the Gospels of the New Testament and in other early Christian writings. Prerequisite: TH201

Art History Courses

CL/AH 241.01 – Survey of Art: Paleolithic to Gothic
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.- Letty Bonnell
A broad overview of art from the Paleolithic age to the Gothic era, focusing on Egyptian, Greek and Roman, early Christian and medieval art and architecture.