Loyola University Maryland

Department of Classics

Future Offerings

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Classes Offered Spring 2015

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 102-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.- Dr. David Jacobson
A continuation of Latin 101 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 103-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.–Staff
A continuation of Latin 102 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 104–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.- Dr. Robert Miola
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 103 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 380–Ovid-Section .01
TTH 3:05-$;30 p.m.- Dr. Joseph Walsh
A reading of extensive selections from the brilliant poet of love and change; human psychology as seen through the lens of the classical myths

Greek Courses

GK 102-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 102-Introductory Greek I-Section .02
TTH 10:50-12:05 p.m.-Dr. Martha Taylor
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 302- Advanced Greek II- Section .01
MWF 12:00-112:50 p.m.- Dr. Thomas McCreight
Readings in Greek at the advanced level. When possible, choice of author or genre is based on student preference.

GK 360- Independent Study: Greek
Dr. Robert Miola
An independent study in Greek language and/or literature. Topics vary.

Classical Civilization Course

English Core Courses

CL/EN 212- The Classical Epics- Section .01
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m.- Dr. David Jacobson
A study of the epic poetry of Homer and Virgil in translation, with an emphasis on the poetry's background, value, and influence. The course may include a short survey of other epics.

Messina Seminars

CL 291D- The Gladiator- Section .01
TTH 10:50-12:05 p.m. and T 1:40-2:30 p.m.- Dr. Joseph Walsh
A first-year Messina seminar that uses ancient and modern texts (e.g., The Colosseum, The Roman Games: A Sourcebook) and films (e.g., Gladiator, Spartacus, The Hunger Games)to illuminate the intersection of cruelty, ideology, and entertainment in the ancient arena.

CL 292D- Race, Conq., & Id Anc N Africa- Section .01
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m. and W 11:00-11:50 a.m.- Dr. Thomas McCreight
A first-year Messina seminar that examines questions of race, imperialism, and cultural/ethnic identity in ancient North Africa, both before and after the Roman conquest. Students are exposed to global diversity and issues of justice, especially with reference to conquered populations, and to questions of assimilation and resistance.

History Core Courses

CL/HS 327- Disasters of Ancient Rome- Section .01
TTH 12:15-1:30 p.m.- Dr. Joseph Walsh
An examination of ancient Rome's greatest disasters: the destruction of Pompeii, the Great Fire of Rome, floods, and plagues. Students investigate the causes of these events; the Romans' efforts to navigate and make sense of them; and the transformations they brought to the ancients' environment, behavior, and thought.

CL/HS 329- Women in Greece and Rome- Section .01
MWF 11:00-11:50 a.m.- Dr. Martha Taylor
An examination of the lives of and attitudes toward women in ancient Greece and Rome. Classic texts of ancient literature are read, masterpieces of art are viewed, and the sociology of ancient women is probed. Topics include the family; prostitution; women of the imperial family; Cleopatra; health, child bearing, and birth control; the source and psychology of Greek misogyny; jet-setters and women's liberation under the early Roman Empire; women and work; women in myth; women in early Christianity; the legacy of classical civilization for modern women.

CL/HS 339- Fall of Two Empires; Rome & Byzantium- Section .01
TTH 12:15-1:30 p.m.- Dr. Kelly DeVries
The Roman and Byzantine Empires each lasted a thousand years, yet both fell. How? This course examines the reasons, internal and external, that brought an end to both empires; how they declined; and how they finally dissolved. An investigation of how the political instability brought about by increasingly weak absolutist governments; the inabilities of their armies and navies to adapt to changes brought about by technological innovations and economic restraints; and the invasions of powerful outside cultural, religious, and military forces played roles in destroying two of the greatest States in history.

 

Other

Theology Courses

CL/TH 224- Gospels & Earliest Churches- Section .01
TTH 4:30-5:45 p.m.- Dr. Heather Parker
Explores what we can discover about Jesus and the earliest Christian communities from the texts of the Gospels and other early Christian literature. Constantly examines how such knowledge is relevant to Christian life today.

CL/TH 224- Gospels & Earliest Churches- Section .02
TTH 3:05-4:20 p.m.- Dr. Heather Parker
Explores what we can discover about Jesus and the earliest Christian communities from the texts of the Gospels and other early Christian literature. Constantly examines how such knowledge is relevant to Christian life today.

CL/TH 229- Images of God in Scripture- Section .01
TTH 3:05-4:20 p.m.- Dr. Lesley DiFransico
Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God.

CL/TH 229- Images of God in Scripture- Section .02
TTH 6:00-7:15 p.m.- Dr. Lesley DiFransico
Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God.

CL/TH 246- Who is Jesus?- Section .01
MWF 8:00-8:50 a.m.- Dr. Rebekah Eklund
Explores the identity of Jesus Christ, as expressed in Scripture, the doctrine and tradition of the Church, as well as in art and literature. Emphasizes the historical context of Jesus' life, the variety of ways in which the significance of that life has been articulated over the centuries, and the ways in which one might discern faithful from unfaithful articulations.

CL/TH 246- Who is Jesus?- Section .02
MWF 9:00-9:50 a.m.- Dr. Rebekah Eklund
Explores the identity of Jesus Christ, as expressed in Scripture, the doctrine and tradition of the Church, as well as in art and literature. Emphasizes the historical context of Jesus' life, the variety of ways in which the significance of that life has been articulated over the centuries, and the ways in which one might discern faithful from unfaithful articulations.

CL 335- Intro Theology of St. Augustine- Section .01
T 6:00-8:30 p.m.- Dr. Angela Christman
Studies the life and writings of the great fifth-century bishop and theologian, Augustine of Hippo. Topics include grace, free will, scripture, and the role of civil authority.

Art History

CL/AH 308- Art of Ancient Greece- Section .01
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m.- Dr. Martha Taylor
A survey of Greek art and architecture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Era. Among the topics considered are Mycenaean tombs and palaces, the development of temple architecture, and the ways in which polytheistic religion shaped life in ancient Greece

Philosophy

CL/PL 368- Introduction to Aristotle- Section .01
TTH 1:40-2:50 p.m.- Dr. Catriona Hanley
A study of Aristotle as a systematic thinker with an integrated view of the natural world, the goals of human life, and the formal properties of thought. Primary focus on selections from Aristotle's logical works and psychological treatises, together with his Physics, Metaphysics, Ethics, and Politics.

Political Science

CL/PS 388- Socratic Political Philosophy- Section .01
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.- Dr. Diana Schaub
Socrates, the first political philosopher, wrote nothing. His unique life and thought are known only through the writings of others--both friends and enemies. By reading works by Aristophanes, Plato, Xenophon, and Nietzsche, students seek to understand the Socratic way of life. The famous "Socratic turn" is examined--Socrates' move from natural philosophy toward political philosophy and the study of "the human things." Students also examine Socrates' quarrel with poets, the Sophists, and the political community itself. Was the Athenian democracy right to put Socrates to death? Finally, Socrates' relations with his friends and students are examined--how and what did he teach them.