Loyola University Maryland

The Office of Academic Affairs

Promotions

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Loyola celebrates the attainments of its faculty members who were recently tenured and/or promoted, one of the most important career milestones in a faculty member's career.

During the 2015-16 academic year, six Loyola faculty members were promoted and twelve were tenured and promoted. Their accomplishments will continue to strengthen student learning experiences, and their scholarly contributions will continue to enrich human and universal understanding and experience.

The profiles of these distinguished faculty members, which follow, describe the faculty members' areas of expertise and give insight into their most significant and rewarding career dimensions.

Harry Allen Brizee, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Writing

Research Interests

Following Ernest L. Boyer’s engaged scholarship model, my research investigates methods of improving students’ skills in writing and research through community engagement. Using qualitative and quantitative methods, I investigate how universities and local communities can collaborate in reciprocal ways to bring about positive change. 

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • WR325 Rhetoric of Professional
  • WR326 Technical Writing 
  • WR100 Effective Writing, I have designed my sections of this class to focus on social justice issues.

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • My co-authored book, Partners in Literacy: A Writing Center Model for Civic Engagement, is currently under contract with Rowman and Littlefield and due out in July 2016. I wrote this book with Jaclyn M. Wells, Assistant Professor of English and Director of the University Writing Center at the University of Alabama Birmingham. Partners in Literacy discusses a three-year community-based research project that joined the Purdue University Writing Lab and its well-known Online Writing Lab (OWL) with two community organizations in Lafayette, Indiana.
  • My most recent journal publication is “Using Isocrates to Teach Technical Communication and Civic Engagement,” which was published in the Journal of Technical Writing and Communication 45.2 (2015): 134-165.
  • I had the pleasure of collaborating with Joe Langmead, former Executive in Residence in Sellinger, to co-author “Cross-Disciplinary Collaboration: Fostering Professional Communication Skills in a Graduate Accounting Certificate Program.” This article was published in Across the Disciplines: A Journal of Language, Learning, and Academic Writing 11.1 (2014).

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Loyola University Maryland Faculty Award for Excellence in Engaged Scholarship, 2015
  • Kolvenbach Summer Research Grant for the York Road Literacy and Employment Initiative, Faculty Mentor for Undergraduate Research Assistant, Giuliana Caranante, 2014
  • Loyola University Maryland Summer Research Grant, 2011, 2012, 2014

What is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Loyola’s commitment to social justice is the most significant and rewarding aspect of working at this university for me. During my campus visit, I asked to meet with Dr. Robin Crews, Director of Service-Learning, to find out more about Loyola’s Center for Community Service and Justice (CCSJ). I was pleased to learn about the school’s serious commitment to service-learning and its growing interest in engaged scholarship. After that meeting, I knew that I could make a positive difference at Loyola and that the CCSJ would fully support my efforts, and the efforts of the writing department, to foster civic engagement.

Ramón Espejo-Saavedra, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures

Research Interests

Modern Spanish narrative, genre theory.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Spanish Short Story of the Nineteenth Century
  • Spanish Romantic Prose

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Autenticidad y artificio en el costumbrismo español. Madrid: Ediciones de la Torre, 2015
  • "Relato y ensayo en 'El retrato' de Mesonero Romanos". Decimonónica 10.10 (Winter/invierno 2013) 64-77.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Chair, department of modern languages and literatures
  • Chair, Undergraduate Curriculum Committee

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Loyola Summer Research Grant 2008, 2010, 2011 

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

For me, the most interesting aspect of my work at Loyola is being able to use my research to inform the design of my classes. By trying out new ideas and approaches to well-known texts, I am able to extend my knowledge of Spanish literature and constantly redefine my approach to the field.

Jon Fulkerson, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Finance

Research Interests

My research focuses on managed portfolios, specifically mutual funds and exchange traded funds.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

GB 620 Fundamentals of Corporate Finance

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Is timing everything? The value of mutual fund trades,” J.A. Fulkerson, Financial Management 42, 2013, 243-261.
  • “What drives ETF flows?,” C.P. Clifford, J.A. Fulkerson, and B.D. Jordan, Financial Review 49, 2014, 619-642. 
  • “Are unsolicited ratings biased? Evidence from long-run stock performance,” S. Byoun, J.A. Fulkerson, S. Han, and Y. Shin, Journal of Banking & Finance 42, 2014, 326-338.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • University Research and Sabbatical Committee
  • Chair of the Sellinger Strategic Planning Committee

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Sellinger Summer Research Grant, 2012-2015

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

One unique aspect for Loyola is how much my research interests overlaps with my students’ careers. As a mutual fund researcher, I almost always have been able to share my ideas with students actually working at mutual funds at Legg Mason and T. Rowe Price. The opportunities for learning for both me and my students have been enormous and Loyola is uniquely positioned in Baltimore to make this happen.

Sharon Green-Hennessy, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Psychology

Research Interests

Access to mental health care and mental health service use.  

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Psychopathology Seminar
  • Assessment: Diagnostic Clinical Methods with Children
  • Psychopathology of Childhood

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Green-Hennessy, S., & Hennessy, K. D. (2015).Predictors of seclusion or restraint within residential treatment centers for children and adolescents.Psychiatric Quarterly, 86, 545-554.
  • Green-Hennessy, S. (2014).Homeschooled adolescents: Developmental outcomes.Journal of Adolescence, 37, 441-449.
  • Green-Hennessy, S. (2013). Cochrane systemic reviews for the mental health field: Is the gold standard tarnished? Psychiatric Services, 64, 65-70.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Loyola Conference and Budget Committees
  • Phase II-Graduate Programs Committee
  • Director, Psychology Masters Practitioner Program

What is Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Shortly after I came to Loyola one of my colleagues described it as a place where there was a  great deal of work – but that work was made easier and went by more quickly because you liked and felt supported by your colleagues. It is that concern for one another that most defines Loyola for me.

Mark Johnson, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Finance

Research Interests

Financial Markets, Financial Institutions, Financial Literacy, Investments, and Behavioral Finance.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • XM 674 Financial Management I
  • FI/BH 320 Financial Management
  • AC 320/FI 426 International Accounting and Finance Study Tour

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Gauging American’s Economic and Financial Capability,” with Douglas J. Lamdin, Business Economics, 2015, Vol. 50, Issue 3, pages 135-146.
  • “Investment and saving and the euro crisis: A new look at Feldstein-Horioka,” with Douglas J. Lamdin, Journal of Economics and Business, 2014, Vol. 76, pages 101-114.
  • “Downside Risk – What the Consumer Sentiment Index Reveals,” with Atsuyuki Naka, Financial Services Review, 2014, Vol. 23, No. 1, pages 54-61.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Sellinger Curriculum Committee, Member
  • Major Advising
  • Investment Committee Member, Catholic Community Foundation of the Archdiocese of Baltimore

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Loyola is a university where there are opportunities to serve, lead, and grow. I think that there is a great balance between teaching, scholarship, and service. Our core values mean a great deal to me personally and it is great to work for and with an organization that places values such as service, justice, academic excellence, integrity and honesty front and center. I especially identify with our core value of constantly challenging myself to improve.

Mark Lewis, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Teacher Education

Research Interests

Mark Lewis has research interests in critical and sociocultural conceptions of adolescence, particularly within young adult literature, and how these conceptions influence secondary language arts pedagogy. He also examines and advocates for equitable educational opportunities for linguistically diverse learners.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • RE 242 Materials for Teaching  Reading
  • ED 423/TE 604 Methods for Teaching English
  • ED 441 Children's and Young Adult Literature in Urban Spaces

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Lewis, M. A., Petrone, R., Sarigianides, S. T. (2016). Acting adolescent?: Critical examinations of the youth-adult binary in Feed and Looking for Alaska. The ALAN Review, 43(2), 43-50.
  • Sarigianides, S. T., Lewis, M. A., & Petrone, R. (Eds.). (2015). Re-thinking "adolescence" to re-imagine English [Special issue]. English Journal, 104(3).
  • Lewis, M. A. (2014). Co-characters in an immigration story: Sixth grade students’ narrative interpretations of literature and life. Middle Grades Research Journal, 9(1), 19-34.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Coordinator for the Loyola Literacy Leadership Awards (honors two Maryland K-12 teachers for their work in literacy education), 2012-2016
  • Coordinator for the “Latino Americans: El Futuro de Balitmore” Speaker Series (collaborated with Enoch Pratt Free Library to secure an American Library Association Grant to support the series), 2015-2016
  • 2012 Bilingual Research Journal Early Career Reviewer’s Award recipient

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Preservice Teachers Learning to Teach Bilingual Writers, Dottie and Lou Hoen Endowment for Education Faculty Development Grant, February 2015, $5,000
  • Portrayals of Urban Youth and Space in Young Adult Literature, Loyola Summer Research Grant, March 2014, $4,000
  • Discourse Analysis of the Talk of English Language Learners and Native English Speakers in a Middle School Classroom, Dottie and Lou Hoen Endowment for Education Faculty Development Grant, April 2012, $6,000

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Loyola provides a space to consider and discuss vital issues related to teaching and learning. Most students in the School of Education are genuinely concerned about equitable educational opportunities for all students, taking a social justice stance toward K-12 education, and it is rewarding to work with those students daily.

Thomas McCreight, Ph.D.

Promoted

Associate Professor of Classics

Fabio Mendez, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Economics

Research Interests

Economic Development and Human Capital Accumulation.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Development Economics
  • Global Studies Senior Seminar

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • On the advantages and disadvantages of subjective measures (with Salar Jahedi).  Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, vol. 98, pp. 97–114, February 2014.
  • A comparative study of training in the private and public sectors: Evidence from the UK and the USA (with Facundo Sepulveda).  Contemporary Economic Policy (accepted June 9, 2015), forthcoming.
  • Legalization and Human Capital Accumulation (with Facundo Sepulveda and Nieves Valdes). Journal of Population Economics (accepted January 16, 2016), forthcoming

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Global Studies Steering Committee Member

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Sellinger, Faculty Devvelopment Summer Grant, 2014
  • Private and Public Training in the USA and the UK (2012); awarded by the European Institute for Research in Economic and Fiscal Issues (IREF).
  • Objective Measures and Subjective Perceptions (2009); $10 000 awarded by the University of Arkansas’ Sutton Research Fund.

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The most rewarding element about Loyola is the living dream of experiencing learning that can be put at the service of the community and can further the search for social justice; while working with others that have similar goals.

John Michel, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Management and International Business

Brian Norman, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of English

Research Interests

I am an Americanist who specializes in African American literature, with additional expertise in multi-ethnic and feminist traditions, and a special penchant for James Baldwin. My research projects arise from my interest in questions of identity, belonging, justice, and the role of literature helping us ask such questions.

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Dead Women Talking (EN379 Gender in American Literature)
  • Captivity (EN203 Major Writers in American Literature)
  • Civil Rights / Civil Writes (HN210 Eloquentia Perfecta)
     

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Founding Director of African and African American Studies (2010-14)
  • Chair of the Undergraduate Curriculum Committee (2012-14)
  • Currently serving as Associate Vice President for Faculty Affairs and Diversity, following a year as Faculty Development Fellow (2014-15)

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • David L. Kalstone Memorial Fund Award, for Neo-Segregation Narratives, Rutgers University (2009)
  • Center for the Humanities, Scholar in Residence, Wesleyan University (spring 2008)

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

As a scholar, teacher, and citizen, I am interested in literature’s role in social change, and I am particularly interested in literary figures who also serve as advocates for American social movements. I am inspired by James Baldwin: he made brilliant contributions both to American letters and the Civil Rights movement. As a white scholar who often studies African American literature, I am drawn to writers who work in identity-based traditions, but whose influence travels across group lines and experiences. Their models of civic participation inspire me to take active roles in addressing issues of justice and inclusion in my university, local, and professional communities. I believe that the twenty-first century needs scholar-citizens who engage pressing questions--be they academic, moral, social, philosophical, religious, or political--with sincere thought and intellectual rigor.  

Kari O'Grady, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Pastoral Counseling

Research Interests

Research interests include pscyho-social-spiritual resilience in individuals, teams, and communities following extreme, large scale, or community trauma events, and social justice and cross-cultural counseling with marginalized populations.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Crisis Intervention
  • Diversity Issues in Counseling
  • Qualitative Research Methods

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Special Issue Editor for the Journal of Psychology and Theology: Spirituality in resilience processes across international contexts (in press).
  • Aten, J.D., O’Grady, K.A., & Worthington, E.L. (2012). The Psychology of Religion and Spirituality for Clinicians: Using Research in Your Practice, New York: Routledge.
  • O’Grady, K.A. & Orton, J.D. (2015). The significance of hope during resilience processes in crisis narratives. Keynote presentation at the Conference on the Humanities and Christianity, Agnon, China.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • The creations of the Center for Trauma Studies and Resilience Leadership (director)
  • Assembly member for the Interfaith Conference of Metropolitan Washington
  • FEMA trained emergency response interfaith chaplain for Montgomery County

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Dean’s Grant (2013). A $7,900 grant to take a doctoral student to the Democratic of the Republic of the Congo to study posttraumatic transformation in female survivors of sexual assault.
  • Dean’s Grant (2012). A $4,500 grant to take a team of doctoral students to Haiti to conduct a follow up quantitative and qualitative study of posttraumatic transformation in Haiti.

What is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

I resonate with the following words spoken at the Jesuit Conference Address to the United Nations: “At its most basic level, peace will come when all of us, as individuals, take responsibility for the fate of others.” There are few academic spaces like Loyola’s in which students and professors alike can contemplate and strive for such peace. I am grateful for the student diversity and Jesuit ideals espoused at Loyola’s pastoral counseling department for it has nurtured my professional and personal mission to be, and teach others to be, people of God who know how be with and for others.

Mohammad Raunak, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Computer Science

Jeremy Schwartz, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Economics

Research Interests

My research over the last six years focuses on the design and effects of unemployment insurance, a program which has been critical to millions of Americans over the last several years.  In addition to unemployment insurance my research includes business cycle dynamics and to a lesser extent industrial organization.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Labor Economics
  • Macroeconomic Principles
  • Managerial Economics

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Schwartz, J.S.  (2015), Optimal Unemployment Insurance when Search Takes Effort and Money, Labour Economics, 36: 1 – 17.
  • Burger, J.D. and Schwartz, J. S. (2014).  Productive Recessions and Jobless Recoveries.  Contemporary Economic Policy. 33(4): 636 – 648.
  • Schwartz, J.  The Job Search Intensity Supply Curve:  How Labor Market Conditions Affect Job Search Effort.  Presented at the SOLE/EALE Joint Meetings, June 2015.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Phase II Budget Policies Group
  • Academic Technologies Committee:  Helped put in place a technology research grant program.
  • Fed Challenge:  Working with students on presenting their analysis of the macroeconomy to the Federal Reserve.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Loyola University Summer Research Grant, 2015
  • Sellinger Summer Research Grant, 2013
  • UpJohn Institute Early Careers Grant Program, 2012

What is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Although I am both excited about my research agenda and my service contributions, the most rewarding aspect of being a part of the Loyola Community is teaching.  I have a passion for the mission of the Loyola and the field of economics.   Consequently, I am excited to step into the classroom and help students get excited about learning.  Over the past several years I have tried to develop new and innovative ways to reach students from different economic experiments in Macro Economic Principles, to service-learning in Labor Economics, to providing real world experiences to students in Managerial Economics.

Wendy Smith, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Teacher Education

Research Interests

My primary work is done with children’s literature that includes characters from marginalized populations such as children with special needs and minorities.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • RE622 Child and Adolescent Literature
  • RE420 Assessment and Instruction in Reading II

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Flores-Koulish, S. & Smith-D’Arezzo, W. M. (in press). The Three Pigs: Can they blow us into critical media literacy, old school style? Journal of Research in Childhood Education.
  • Smith-D’Arezzo, W. M. (2015). Cinder: A new-age fairy tale requires a new lens. SIGNAL Journal, 38(2), 15-19.
  • Smith-D’Arezzo, W. M. & Musgrove, M. (2011). Two professors critique the representations of Africans and African Americans in picture books. Equity and Excellence in Education 44(2), 188-202.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Chair of the Teacher Education Department for two terms
  • Continued service to Sisters Academy of Baltimore a Nativity School for girls
  • Faculty moderator for Project Mexico (2012-13, 2013-14)

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

When I came to Loyola from a public university, I was excited to be a part of an educational institution that recognized the importance of care for the whole person, including the spiritual well-being of the students, faculty and staff. This emphasis on Ignatian Pedagogy has been significant to me in my teaching and my service and carries over to my research in the work I do with literature that includes marginalized populations. I love that Loyola gives me the opportunity to focus on cura personalis in all three areas of my vocation.

Andrea Thomas, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures

Research Interest

My research focuses on 19th and 20th century French Literature, textual criticism, and literary criticism.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • FR 340 Topics in French Theatre
  • FR 359 The Fantastic 19th Century
  • FR 216 Exploring the Text/Introduction to French Studies

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Lautréamont, Subject to Interpretation. Amsterdam: Rodopi, 2015.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Academic Senate, member (2010-2011)
  • A New Way of Proceeding Phase II, Utilities Working Group (2012-2013)
  • Junior Faculty Symposium Moderator (2010-2012)

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Harry Ransom Center Travel Stipend (for research at the University of Texas Austin), Summer 2011.

What is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The most rewarding aspect of working at Loyola is getting to know so many wonderful colleagues and students who prioritize education as a life-long pursuit. A “day at the office” means hearing eight languages spoken by as many people, helping students express themselves in French over complicated topics, and collaborating with others on ways to improve our classes and our community. I couldn’t ask for a more fulfilling job.

Jinghua Wangling, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures

Research Interests

My research interests center on early and medieval Chinese literature, especially classical Chinese poetry. I am also interested in investigating the value of pre-modern Chinese literature and culture in contemporary society.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Introduction to Traditional Chinese Culture
  • Old Wine in a New Bottle: Modern Film and Classical Chinese Tales 
  • Chinese I

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Singing Lips for a Whole Lifetime Watched:” A Study of Ninth-Century Chinese Poetry and Entertainment Culture “歌唇一世衔雨看”——九世纪诗歌与伎乐文化研究 (Shanghai: Fudan University Press, forthcoming)
  • “The Speaker and the Protagonist: A New Approach to Li Shangyin’s Poetry” 说话者与主人公:李商隐诗歌解析方法新探. Journal of Capital Normal University (Social Sciences Edition) 首都师范大学学报 (社会科学版), 2011.10 (no. 5): 63-70. 
  • “Always Expressed Indirectly? New Investigations of Li Shangyin’s Poetry about Women and Love” 楚雨含情皆有托?——李商隐女性爱情诗新探. Sinology Studies 中国学研究14 (2011.8): 88-95.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Coordinator of the Chinese Program
  • Faculty Moderator of the Chinese Club
  • University Board on Dicipline

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Loyola University Maryland Summer Research Grant (2010, 2011, 2013)
  • Loyola University Maryland Tenure-Track Research Leave (2011)

What is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The educational aims of Chinese culture to cultivate the whole person spiritually, intellectually, and physically are in accordance with Loyola’s Jesuit mission of developing the whole person. Loyola facilitates an environment where I am able to fulfill these aims while helping my students “learn, lead, and serve in a diverse and changing world.” I find great pleasure in seeing students improve their language skills, gain a deeper understanding of Chinese culture, and achieve success in their personal lives and professional careers after leaving Loyola.

Guangzhi Zhao, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Marketing

Research Interests

Empirically examine the efficacy of persuasive marketing communications (e.g., nostalgia advertising, online consumer product reviews and words-of-mouth, etc.) at change consumers’ brand attitudes and purchase intentions.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • XM 764 Marketing Management
  • GB 746 Strategies for Marketing Communications
  • MK 240 Marketing

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Cai, Yuanyuan, Guangzhi Zhao, and and Jiaxun He (2015) “How Does Intergenerational Communication Influence Brand Equity? An Empirical Study in China,” Journal of Business Research, 68 (3), 553-560.
  • Zhao, Guangzhi, Darrel D. Muehling, and Ioannis Kareklas (2014), “Remembering the Good Old Days: The Moderating Role of Consumer Affective State on the Effectiveness of Nostalgic Advertising,” Journal of Advertising, 43(3), 244-255.
  • Zhao, Guangzhi, Weiwei Li, Lefa Teng, Taihong Lu (2014), “The Moderating Role of Consumer Self-Concept on the Effectiveness of Two Nostalgia Appeals,” Journal of Promotion Management, 20 (1), 1-19.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Loyola Academic Senate, department representative
  • Sellinger School of Business, Curriculum Committee
  • Loyola Marketing Association, faculty advisor

What is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Loyola is a great place that promotes “a love for learning, discovery, and integration across a wide range of disciplines and interests” for everybody. Loyola also strongly encourages holistic growth outside the academic context. The “Whole Person” ideal especially resonates with me. Loyola cares for and provides abundant opportunities for developing my intellectual, physical, psychological, social, and spiritual health and well-being. It is my belief that everyone’s unique needs can be met at Loyola because of the genuine commitment to generous service involving every person on campus. Finally, Loyola has the most beautiful campus in the world. I love it!

Lisa Zimmerelli, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Writing