Loyola University Maryland

The Office of Academic Affairs

Promotions

Loyola celebrates the attainments of its faculty members who were recently tenured and/or promoted, one of the most important career milestones in a faculty member's career.

During the 2016-17 academic year, three Loyola faculty members were tenured and promoted. Their accomplishments will continue to strengthen student learning experiences, and their scholarly contributions will continue to enrich human and universal understanding and experience.

The profiles of these distinguished faculty members, which follow, describe the faculty members' areas of expertise and give insight into their most significant and rewarding career dimensions.

Jean Lee Cole, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of English

Research Interests

Nineteenth- and early-twentieth century U.S. literature, especially African American literature. Periodical studies, book history, publishing history. Baltimore history.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • History of the Novel in the U.S.
  • The American West
  • Understanding Literature

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Rising from the Gutter: Rudolph Block, the Comic Strip, and the Ghetto Fiction of Bruno Lessing”
  • Freedom’s Witness: The Civil War Correspondence of Henry McNeal Turner; Zora Neale Hurston: Collected Plays (co-edited with Charles Mitchell)

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Currently Faculty Director for Community-Engaged Learning and Scholarship
  • Editor of scholarly journal American Periodicals
  • Previously, President of the Research Society of American Periodicals

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Being a professor at Loyola has allowed me to bring my interests in place, racial and social justice, pedagogy, and literary study together into a single career. Our goal to cultivate cura personalis in our students also applies to our faculty.

 

Cheryl Moore-Thomas, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Education Specialties

Research Interests

My research interests are multicultural counseling, cultural identity development and college access and equity.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • GC708 Cross Cultural Counseling
  • GC706 Group Counseling Schools
  • GC804 Access and Equity in Higher Education

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Moore-Thomas, C. (2016). Cultural identity development. In D. Hays and B. Erford (Eds.), Developing multicultural counseling competency: A systems approach (3rd ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merill Prentice Hall.
  • Bryan, J., Moore-Thomas, C., Day-Vines, N., & Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2011). School counselors as social capital: The effects of high school college counseling on college application rates. Journal of Counseling and Development, 89, 190-199.
  • Moore-Thomas, C., & Day-Vines, N., (2010) Culturally competent collaboration: School counselor collaboration with African American families and communities. Professional School Counseling, 14(1), 53-63.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Member of the University Strategic Planning Committee
  • Member of the Board on Rank and Tenure
  • President of the Maryland Counseling Association

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

I have always understood teaching as my calling. Over time, I have come to understand the privilege and responsibility I have to work with students to co-create environments where questions and concepts are effectively and deeply tied to theory and practice, yet simultaneously interwoven with larger, timeless demonstrated commitments to social justice, integrity and cura personalis. This resulting unique positioning of scholar-teacher and service for the greater good is an inspiring component of Jesuit education and my work at Loyola. It is what makes my work both meaningful and joyful. It is truly what has been both significant and most rewarding about my career at Loyola University Maryland.

 

Joshua Smith, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Teacher Education

Research Interests

My primary research agenda examines cognitive and affective changes associated with major educational transitions at two critical junctures in students’ lives; transition from middle school to high school and from high school to college.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Advanced Studies in Education (ED625)
  • Capstone Course in Elementary Education (ED 446)

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Berumen, J. G., Zerquera, D. D., & Smith, J. S. (2015). More than access: The role of support services in the transitional experiences of underrepresented students in a statewide access program. Journal of Student Financial Aid, 45(1), 26-44.
  • Smith, J. S., Estudillo, A., & Kang, H. (2011). Racial differences in eighth grade students’ identification with academics. Education and Urban Society, 43(1), 73-90.
  • Smith, J. S., Akos, P., Lim, S., & Wiley, S. (2008). Student and stakeholder perceptions of the transition to high school. High School Journal, 91(3), 32-42.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • 2013-2014 Creating an Institute for Urban Catholic Education (co-PI R. Simmons & J. Smith) – Raskob Foundation and Archdiocese of Baltimore - $60,000
  • 2011-2012 Cyber Peer-Led Team Learning: Using communications technologies to support learning and persistence- EDUCAUSE Next Generation Learning Challenges (Co-PI P. Varma-Nelson, J. Smith, T. Pitzer, & N. Pelaez) - $250,000
  • 2009-2014 Evaluation of Urban Education Excellence: STEM Teaching Residency with Dual Licensure in Special Education- Indianapolis Public Schools and Urban Teacher Residency United- $216,500

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Member, Archdiocese of Baltimore School Board
  • Chair, Budget Policies Committee of the New Way of Proceeding
  • Chair, AJCU Education Deans Conference

What is Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The most rewarding part of working at Loyola University Maryland is the people. I continue to be impressed with faculty commitment to excellence in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service. Our graduate and undergraduate students come to Loyola hungry for intellectual engagement and I am seeing more of a concerted effort for increased faculty-student conversation, collaboration, and connection.

 

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