Loyola University Maryland

The Office of Academic Affairs

Promotions

Loyola celebrates the attainments of its faculty members who were recently tenured and/or promoted, one of the most important career milestones in a faculty member's career.

During the 2016-17 academic year, seventeen Loyola faculty members were tenured and/or promoted. Their accomplishments will continue to strengthen student learning experiences, and their scholarly contributions will continue to enrich human and universal understanding and experience.

The profiles of these distinguished faculty members, which follow, describe the faculty members' areas of expertise and give insight into their most significant and rewarding career dimensions.

Mavis Biss, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Philosophy

Research Interests

Mavis Biss specializes in moral philosophy, with particular focus on Kantian ethics and conceptions of moral creativity. Her current book project addresses problems of contested moral meaning.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Art and Imagination
  • Philosophy and  Feminism
  • Truth, Love and Happiness: The Promises of Ancient Philosophy

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Radical Moral Imagination and Moral Luck” in Metaphilosophy
  • “Kantian Moral Striving” in Kantian Review
  • “Avoiding Vice and Pursing Virtue” in Pacific Philosophical Quarterly

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Committee for the Enhancement of Teaching and Learning

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Summer Research Grants 2011, 2012 and 2016

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

After parenting, teaching is the most important thing that I do. I am grateful to my Loyola students for the sincerity of their effort, their energy and for the ways they surprise me by reframing questions I thought I had a handle on. I am also incredibly grateful to be part of a community of teachers who inspire me with their creativity and commitment to justice.

Kerry Boeye, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Fine Arts

Marianna Carlucci, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Psychology

Research Interests

My research interests lie at the intersection of psychology and the law. I conduct research in the areas of eyewitness memory, juror decision making, deception detection, and interrogations.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • PY421 Forensic Psychology
  • PY291, PY292, PY746 Research Methods
  • PY256 Psychology of Gender

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Carlucci, M. E., & Golom, F. G. (2016). Juror perceptions of female-female sexual harassment: Do sexual orientation and type of harassment matter? Journal of Aggression, Conflict and Peace Research, 8, 1-9.
  • Carlucci, M. E., Schreiber Compo, N., Zimmerman, L. (2013). Deception detection during high-stakes truths and lies. Legal and Criminological Psychology, 18, 314-323. 
  • Carol, R. N., Carlucci, M. E., Eaton, A. A., Wright, D. B. (2013). The power of a co-witness: When more power leads to more conformity. Applied Cognitive Psychology, 27, 344-351.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • 2012 and 2015: Tenure Track Applied Experimental Psychology Searches
  • 2012 – present: Academic Standards Committee, Member
  • 2014 – present: Overlea High School Collaboration with Education Department

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • 2013 Society for the Psychological Study of Social Issues Grants-In-Aid ($1,561)
  • 2013 Loyola University Maryland Dean's Summer Research Grant ($4,000)

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

My six years at Loyola have been immensely rewarding. It is difficult to pinpoint one aspect that is most significant. First, I am so thankful that I work at a Jesuit institution where people have a deeper calling to care for others, act on behalf of others, and challenge each other intellectually. Second, I have truly enjoyed the deep professional relationships I have cultivated with my students. Seeing a student grow both personally and professionally is one of the greatest pleasures of my academic career.

Tuugi Chuluun, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Finance

Research Interests

My Research areas span corporate finance, international finance, and behavioral finance, with the unifying theme of the role of networks in finance stretching across all three areas.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • FI340 Global Financial Management
  • FI722 Investments

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • "Firm Network Structure and Innovation" with Andrew Prevost and Arun Upadhyay (Journal of Corporate Finance forthcoming) 
  • “Global Portfolio Investment Network and Stock Market Comovement” (Global Finance Journal forthcoming)
  • "Local Happiness and Firm Behavior: Do Firms in Happy Places Invest More?" with Carol Graham (Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization, 125, 2016, 41-56; Featured at HBR.org, brookings.edu, ozy.com)

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Faculty Moderator of Financial Management Association’s (FMA) Loyola Chapter since 2013. FMA Loyola has consistently received the “Superior Chapter” designation – the highest honor for an FMA Student Chapter that fewer than 10% of the nearly 200 active student chapters around the world receive.
  • Chartered Financial Analysts Baltimore Society, Board member and University liaison (2013- Present), Membership chair (2014-16)

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Loyola is a unique place, where high-quality research, rigorous instruction, and dedicated service are merged in line with the Jesuit values of Magis and Cura Personalis.

Jean Lee Cole, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of English

Research Interests

Nineteenth- and early-twentieth century U.S. literature, especially African American literature. Periodical studies, book history, publishing history. Baltimore history.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • History of the Novel in the U.S.
  • The American West
  • Understanding Literature

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Rising from the Gutter: Rudolph Block, the Comic Strip, and the Ghetto Fiction of Bruno Lessing”
  • Freedom’s Witness: The Civil War Correspondence of Henry McNeal Turner; Zora Neale Hurston: Collected Plays (co-edited with Charles Mitchell)

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Currently Faculty Director for Community-Engaged Learning and Scholarship
  • Editor of scholarly journal American Periodicals
  • Previously, President of the Research Society of American Periodicals

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Being a professor at Loyola has allowed me to bring my interests in place, racial and social justice, pedagogy, and literary study together into a single career. Our goal to cultivate cura personalis in our students also applies to our faculty.

Raenita Fenner, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Engineering

Research Interests

My research interests include the application of evolutionary algorithms in electromagnetic free space material characterization.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • EG487 Electromagnetics
  • EG432 Electronics
  • EG333 Signals and Systems

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Fenner, R. A., E. J. Rothwell, and L. L. Frasch (2012), A comprehensive analysis of free-space and guided-wave techniques for extracting the permeability and permittivity of materials using reflection-only measurements, Radio Sci., 47, RS1004, doi:10.1029/2011RS004755.
  • R. A. Fenner; E. J. Rothwell; L. L. Frasch; J. L. Frasch, “Characterization of Conductor-Backed Dielectric Materials With Genetic Algorithms and Free Space Methods,” in IEEE Microwave and Wireless Components Letters , vol.PP, no.99, pp.1-3
    doi: 10.1109/LMWC.2016.2556682

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Advisor to the Society of Women Engineers
  • Member of the Academic Technology Committee and University Board on Dicipline
  • Chair of the Baltimore IEEE Women in Engineering Affiliate Society

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Grant Award from the Engineering Information Foundation.
    The project is titled Integrating Writing into Engineering Labs: Developing Curriculum, Supporting Faculty, and Creating a Writing Fellows Program.

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Working at Loyola is rewarding to me because of the unique blend of responsibilities in teaching, research, and service. The teaching environment at Loyola is one that is “student centered”. This is in conjunction with an environment that promotes excellence in research and values not only service to the University, but to the community and social justice.

Michelle Gawerc, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Sociology

Research Interests

I have a strong scholarly interest in the ways in which peace activists, in situations of violent and protracted conflict, manage to work across conflict lines and develop a strong sense of "we." My current research focuses on how joint peace movement organizations in Israel/Palestine are able to construct and maintain shared collective identities (i.e., a sense of "we"), thus allowing them to engage in joint action for peace, in a political environment where each side is cast as the enemy of the other.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • SC339 Conflict, War, and Peace
  • SC376 Conflict Narratives, Media Framing, and Peacebuilding: Israel-Palestine
  • SC441 Reconciliation and justice After (and During) Violent Conflict

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Gawerc, Michelle I. 2016. “Constructing a Collective Identity across Conflict Lines: Israeli-Palestinian Peace Movement Organizations” in Mobilization: An International Quarterly 21(2), 193-212.
  • Gawerc, Michelle I. 2016. “Advocating Peace in the Midst of the 2014 War in Gaza” in
      Peace Review 28(1), 108-113.
  • Gawerc, Michelle I. and Ned Lazarus. 2016. “Doing No Harm? Donor Policies and
    Power Asymmetry in Israeli-Palestinian Peacebuilding” in Peace and Change: a Journal of Peace Research 41(3), 386-397.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • I have served as a member of the Global Studies Steering Committee, and have been involved in structuring the program and vetting candidates for the Global Studies Hanway Chair.
  • I was instrumental in founding the Peace and Justice Studies minor at Loyola. More specifically, I collaborated in the effort to create the documents that led to the $1.75 million dollar gift for this new program, to develop the curriculum for the proposed minor, and to draft the application form for the proposed peace and justice studies minor.
  • I designed and established a Dual-Narrative Trip to Israel/Palestine for students, which I intend to conduct once the situation in Israel/Palestine is deemed to be safe by the Office of International Programs.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Lilly Fellows Program Summer Seminar for College and University Teachers 2012: “Teaching Peace and Reconciliation: Theory and Practice in Northern Ireland.” 
  • Loyola Summer Research Grant 2014 and 2015.
  • Dean’s Supplemental Professional Development Fund Grant 2015 for research.

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Principally, I am drawn to Loyola because of Loyola’s appreciation of value-engaged scholarship, and scholarship with practical—as well as theoretical—import. I have long sought to design research projects that focus on the problems facing our world today and the different efforts being taken to promote peace and social justice. In carving out research questions with an awareness of what type of research could help to promote peace and justice, I celebrate the Jesuit tradition of valuing research that addresses significant social issues as well as encouraging both scholarship and education, which is unapologetically open to values of social justice.

Joshua Hendrick, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Sociology

Research Interests

Religion and Politics, Social Movements, Middle East Studies, Turkey.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Societies and Institutions
  • Social Theory
  • Islamic Social Movements

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • 2017 - “A Turkish Red Herring? The Production and Consumption of Fethullah Gülen” In The Gülen Movement vs. the Turkish State: The Clash of Islamic Movements. Hakan Yavuz and Bayram Balci eds. Salt Lake City. University of Utah Press. Forthcoming.
  • 2017 - “Old and New Battles over Turkish National Identity” In The New Middle East: Social and Political Change in the Twenty-First Century. Valerie J. Hoffman, ed. Syracuse, NY. University of Syracuse Press. Forthcoming
  • 2013 -Gülen: The Ambiguous Politics of Market Islam in Turkey and the World, New York University Press. New York. New York University Press

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Global Studies Steering Committee
  • ACE Internationalization Task Force
  • Middle East Relief Initiative, Faculty Moderator

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • 2015 Institute for Turkish Studies, Sabbatical Research Award

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Since arriving at Loyola, I have been an active and dedicated participant in the Global Studies Program.  My experience working with colleagues in history, political science, and economics has only strengthened my positive feelings about my own interdisciplinary training, and has contributed significantly to my development as both a scholar and a teacher. I view global studies at Loyola as an emerging centerpiece of the institution, and as a real opportunity for students and faculty alike to expand their interests in world society and cross-cultural communication. I am excited to play a central role in the continued development of what is becoming a flagship program here at Loyola.

Gregory Hoplamazian, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Communication

Research Interests

His research interests include the role of social identity in media processing and persuasion, particularly in advertising contexts.  Past work has examined how cultural cues of race, social status, and gender influence viewer attitudes toward media content and the self.

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Hoplamazian, G. J., & Knobloch-Westerwick, S. (2014). The color of their collar: Effects 
    of social status portrayal in advertising on self-esteem. Howard Journal of Communications, 25(4), 378-398. DOI: 10.1080/10646175.2014.955930
  • Hoplamazian, G. J. & Appiah, O. (2013). Viewer responses to character race and social 
    status in advertising: Blacks see color, whites see class. Journal of Current Issues & Research in Advertising, 34(1), 57-76.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Three years spent on the Faculty Compensation Committee, and two years as the FCC representative on Compensation and Benefits Committee.
  • Has served as the Faculty Advisor for Loyola’s Advertising Club since Fall 2012 (member of American Advertising Federation)
  • Served as Faculty Associate for Fulbright Visiting Scholar in the Department of Communication, Fall 2015.

Grants and Fellowships Awarded

  • Received grant from Marketing Science Institute ($1,720) to study dynamics of advertising spokesperson and cultural cues in digital advertising, (2014-2015)
  • Received Digital Pedagogy Fellowship from Loyola University Maryland (Summer 2015) to foster critical thinking about digital and online pedagogy, as well as gain specific skills with emerging software and platforms for digital content creation.

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

I think the most rewarding part of teaching at Loyola has been witnessing growth.  By this I mean the growth of my students both personally and academically, the growth of my department and the university, and my own growth as an educator.  In all these areas I have seen how good leadership is necessary for growth, and I feel blessed to be in a place where I have grown from others’ leadership, have had the opportunity to provide spaces for my students to grow as well.

Michiko Iwasaki, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Psychology

Research Interests

Geropsychology and Cultural diversity

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Adulthood and Aging
  • Lifespan Development
  • Counseling/Psychotherapy Techniques

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Iwasaki, M., Thai, J.C., & Lyons, Z.H. (2016). Perceptions of societal microaggressions 
    in Japanese American women married to White American men. Journal of Couple and Family Psychology: Research and Practice, 5: 180-196. doi.org/10.1037/cfp0000065
  • Iwasaki, M., Pierson, M.E.,, Madison, D., & McCurry, M.S., (2015). Long-term-care 
    planning and preferences among Japanese American baby boomers: A comparison to Non-Japanese Americans. The Journal of Geriatrics and Gerontology International, 15: 1-11. doi: 10.1111/ggi.12601
  • Zucchero, A.R., Iwasaki, M., Lewis, M. M., Lee, JY., & Robbins, M. (2014). Social 
    justice training within geropsychology: Using non-traditional pedagogies to cultivate a future competent workforce. The Counseling Psychologist, 42(7): 946-971. doi.org/10.1177/0011000014540342

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Psychology Department Undergraduate & Master’s Committees
  • Undergraduate Academic Standard Committee 
  • Dementia care awareness workshops in Japanese in our local communities  
    (DC/VA/MD region).

Grants and Fellowships Awarded

  • Program evaluation of the Baltimore City Sexual Assault Response Team (SART): Funded by Kolvenbach Research Grant ($7,278) 
  • Japan-U.S. & Japan-Canada Cross-national marriages: Funded ($5,000) by Japan Medical Support Network (JAMSNET)-New York ($1,000 + $500) & JAMSENT-Tokyo ($3,500)

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Since arriving at Loyola, I have attempted to exemplify the Ignatian tradition of cura personalis, which emphasizes the care for the entire person, personal growth, and insight. Loyola also places a special emphasis on diversity and justice.  These core Jesuit principles have guided me in teaching, research, and service at Loyola as I practice a sense of generativity – contributing something meaningful to the world and to the next generation (Erick Erikson,1982). I feel honored to be a member of Loyola where Jesuit values connect and support students, faculty, administrators, and support staff into a cohesive community with a compassionate goal.

John Keiss, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Theology

Research Interests

As a moral theologian, my research interests lie at the intersection of religion, conflict, and peace.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • TH304 Introduction to Christian Ethics
  • HN499 The Examined Life
  • TH677 Theologies and Ethics of Social Justice

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Hannah Arendt and Theology (London: Bloomsbury/T&T Clark, 2016) 
  • “Restorative Justice and the International Criminal Court,” The Journal of Moral Theology 5:2 (June 2016): 116-142
  • “Descending into the Ordinary: Lived Theology, War, and the Moral Agency of Civilians” in Lived Theology: New Perspectives on Method, Style, and Pedagogy, ed. Charles Marsh, Peter Slade, and Sarah Azaransky (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 2016)

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Director, Office of Peace and Justice Studies
  • Steering Committee of the Religion, Social Conflict, and Peace Group (American Academy of Religion)
  • Vestry, St. Luke’s Episcopal Church

Grants and Fellowships Awarded

  • Virginia Seminar Writing Fellowship, Project on Lived Theology 
  • Loyola University Senior Sabbatical
  • Loyola University Summer Research Grant

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

What is most rewarding about serving as a faculty member at Loyola is being part of an institution where education is understood as more than preparing students for success in their chosen professions; it is about forming whole persons motivated to use their gifts and talents for the building of a more just and peaceful society.  Whether in my teaching, research, or service, I find that everything I do has deeper meaning because it is part of a broader mission that sees the university as a social force for doing good in the world. 

Cheryl Moore-Thomas, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Education Specialties

Research Interests

My research interests are multicultural counseling, cultural identity development and college access and equity.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • GC708 Cross Cultural Counseling
  • GC706 Group Counseling Schools
  • GC804 Access and Equity in Higher Education

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Moore-Thomas, C. (2016). Cultural identity development. In D. Hays and B. Erford (Eds.), Developing multicultural counseling competency: A systems approach (3rd ed). Upper Saddle River, NJ: Pearson Merill Prentice Hall.
  • Bryan, J., Moore-Thomas, C., Day-Vines, N., & Holcomb-McCoy, C. (2011). School counselors as social capital: The effects of high school college counseling on college application rates. Journal of Counseling and Development, 89, 190-199.
  • Moore-Thomas, C., & Day-Vines, N., (2010) Culturally competent collaboration: School counselor collaboration with African American families and communities. Professional School Counseling, 14(1), 53-63.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Member of the University Strategic Planning Committee
  • Member of the Board on Rank and Tenure
  • President of the Maryland Counseling Association

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

I have always understood teaching as my calling. Over time, I have come to understand the privilege and responsibility I have to work with students to co-create environments where questions and concepts are effectively and deeply tied to theory and practice, yet simultaneously interwoven with larger, timeless demonstrated commitments to social justice, integrity and cura personalis. This resulting unique positioning of scholar-teacher and service for the greater good is an inspiring component of Jesuit education and my work at Loyola. It is what makes my work both meaningful and joyful. It is truly what has been both significant and most rewarding about my career at Loyola University Maryland.

Megan Olsen, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Computer Science

Research Interests

My research focuses on investigating complex systems in biology and computer science, primarily through modeling and simulation. My recent research has three research directions: improving simulation validation, using reinforcement learning in competitive environments such as predator-prey modeling, and modeling complex systems.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • CS201 Computer Science I
  • CS455 Human Computer Interaction
  • CS484 Artificial Intelligence

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • M. Olsen and M. Raunak. Metamorphic Validation for Agent-based Simulation Models. Proceedings of the Summer Simulation Multi-Conference. July 2016. (nominated for Best Paper Award).
  • M. Olsen and *R. Fraczkowski. Coevolution in Predator Prey through Reinforcement Learning. Journal of Computational Science. 9:118-124. July 2015. (top paper at ICCS conference).
  • M. Olsen and M. Raunak. A Method for Quantified Confidence of DEVS Validation. Proceedings of SpringSim TMS/DEVS. April 2015.

    * denotes student author

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Re-Imagining the Undergraduate Curriculum Strategic Plan Working Group Planning Team Member (2015-2016)
  • Coordinator of Maryland NCWIT Aspirations in Computing Affiliate Award (2012-present)
  • Director, Camp BaltiCode (2016-present)

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Acquisition of a Computing Cluster to Enable Transformative Research Across Disciplines. M. Olsen (PI), Dave Binkley (co-PI), Birgit Albrecht (co-PI), Jeremy Schwartz (co-PI). Sub- mitted to National Science Foundation (NSF) program MRI: Major Research Infrastructure. $280K award to build university-wide research computing cluster. 2016
  • NCWIT Student Seed Fund. $3K for women in technology club. 2016
  • Family League of Baltimore Summer Program Grant. $6K for running summer program to support Baltimore city girls interested in computing. 2016.

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

I love that Loyola has a strong set of core values that match my own values, such as support for diversity, community engagement, and academic excellence. At Loyola I feel supported to continue my work in broadening participation in computer science, such as through the Maryland Aspirations in Computing Award and Camp BaltiCode. At the same time, Loyola expects excellence in teaching while simultaneously supporting faculty research. It’s wonderful to be at an institution where good teaching is important, and where faculty really get to know their students throughout their four years of college.

Terre Ryan, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Writing

Research Interests

I am a creative writer and an interdisciplinary scholar specializing in environmental writing. My research focuses on environmental justice, American literature and culture, race and gender theory, American environmental writing, and American landscapes as politically constructed texts.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Writing about the Environment
  • Writing about Science
  • Travel Writing

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Ryan, Terre. “The White House Kitchen Garden and the Aesthetics of Social Order.” ISLE: Interdisciplinary Studies in Literature and Environment 23, no. 4 (Autumn 2016): 657-676.
  • Ryan, Terre. “‘Changing the Conversation’: Contexts for Reading Michelle Obama’s American Grown: The Story of the White House Kitchen Garden and Gardens Across America.” Frontiers: A Journal of Women’s Studies 37, no. 3 (2016): 75-108. 
  • Ryan, Terre. “‘Clean Air, Clean Water, and Jobs Forever’: Filming Mountaintop Removal Coal Mining.’” In Working on Earth: Class and Environmental Justice, edited by Christina Robertson and Jennifer Westerman, 123-42. Reno: University of Nevada Press, 2015.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • To Loyola: Member, Sustainability Committee
  • To Loyola: Co-chair, Climate Education Working Group (a subcommittee of the Sustainability Committee)
  • To the Baltimore community: Through Campus Ministry, I participate in the Loaves and Fishes food justice initiative in downtown Baltimore. Along with a team of Loyola colleagues, I prepare and deliver food to Baltimoreans experiencing homelessness.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Internal: Digital Pedagogy Fellowship, Loyola University Maryland, 2016
  • External: Postdoctoral Fellowship, Smithsonian Institution, Summer 2013
  • External: Summer Research Fellowship, Harvard University’s Dumbarton Oaks Research Library and Collection, 2012

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Justice and diversity are integral to my teaching, and I appreciate teaching in a Jesuit university because our commitments to justice and diversity are woven into our mission. As an interdisciplinary scholar, I also appreciate the way Jesuit education facilitates integrative learning. I deeply enjoy the creative camaraderie of the classroom. For the most part, the students I’ve taught at Loyola have what I think of as a learning and earning work ethic. These students work hard; they care about learning the material and earning—rather than simply getting—good grades.

Joshua Smith, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Teacher Education

Research Interests

My primary research agenda examines cognitive and affective changes associated with major educational transitions at two critical junctures in students’ lives; transition from middle school to high school and from high school to college.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Advanced Studies in Education (ED625)
  • Capstone Course in Elementary Education (ED 446)

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Berumen, J. G., Zerquera, D. D., & Smith, J. S. (2015). More than access: The role of support services in the transitional experiences of underrepresented students in a statewide access program. Journal of Student Financial Aid, 45(1), 26-44.
  • Smith, J. S., Estudillo, A., & Kang, H. (2011). Racial differences in eighth grade students’ identification with academics. Education and Urban Society, 43(1), 73-90.
  • Smith, J. S., Akos, P., Lim, S., & Wiley, S. (2008). Student and stakeholder perceptions of the transition to high school. High School Journal, 91(3), 32-42.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • 2013-2014 Creating an Institute for Urban Catholic Education (co-PI R. Simmons & J. Smith) – Raskob Foundation and Archdiocese of Baltimore - $60,000
  • 2011-2012 Cyber Peer-Led Team Learning: Using communications technologies to support learning and persistence- EDUCAUSE Next Generation Learning Challenges (Co-PI P. Varma-Nelson, J. Smith, T. Pitzer, & N. Pelaez) - $250,000
  • 2009-2014 Evaluation of Urban Education Excellence: STEM Teaching Residency with Dual Licensure in Special Education- Indianapolis Public Schools and Urban Teacher Residency United- $216,500

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Member, Archdiocese of Baltimore School Board
  • Chair, Budget Policies Committee of the New Way of Proceeding
  • Chair, AJCU Education Deans Conference

What is Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The most rewarding part of working at Loyola University Maryland is the people. I continue to be impressed with faculty commitment to excellence in the areas of teaching, scholarship, and service. Our graduate and undergraduate students come to Loyola hungry for intellectual engagement and I am seeing more of a concerted effort for increased faculty-student conversation, collaboration, and connection.

Rev. Jill Snodgrass, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Pastoral Counseling

Research Interests

My research addresses spiritual care and pastoral counseling with traditionally marginalized populations, specifically individuals experiencing homelessness and women transitioning from prison.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • PC732 Spiritual and Theological Dimensions of Suffering
  • PC741 Foundations of Social Justice
  • PC934 Educational Technology

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Snodgrass, J. L., Jenkins, B. B., & Tate, K. F. (in press). More than a job club, sister: Career intervention for women following incarceration. The Career Development Quarterly
  • Maynard, E. A., & Snodgrass, J. L. (Eds.). (2015). Understanding pastoral counseling. New York, NY: Springer Publishing Company. 
  • Snodgrass, J. L. (2014). Pastoral care and counseling with the “un-homeless homeless”: Understanding cultures of homelessness. Journal of Pastoral Care & Counseling, 68(2), 4:1-12. Retrieved from http://journals.sfu.ca/jpcp/index.php/jpcp/article/view/730

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Developing the new Faith and Social Justice track in the M.A. in Spiritual and Pastoral Care and teaching the first courses in the track.
  • Creating a spiritually-integrated job readiness curriculum and implementing it at a local Baltimore women’s shelter.
  • Serving as Vice Chair of the Atlantic Region of the American Association of Pastoral Counselors with the responsibility of planning and hosting two annual conferences of over 100 attendees.

Grants and Fellowships Awarded

  • Project Grant for Researchers, Spring 2015 - The Louisville Institute, Louisville, KY
  • Summer Research Grant, 2012 & 2013 - Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD
  • Kolvenbach Summer Research Grant, 2012 - Loyola University Maryland, Baltimore, MD

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

My mission as a scholar-practitioner-activist is to foster connection between the university and the community, to create a more just society, and to equip students with the knowledge, skill, and spirit required to be spiritual caregivers and pastoral counselors. As a Jesuit Catholic university, Loyola has offered me tremendous opportunities to live out my mission and to continue to grow both intellectually and spiritually. The Jesuit values at the core of the university and the Pastoral Counseling Department have enriched my life personally and professionally.

Rebecca Trump, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Marketing

Research Interests

Consumer Psychology and Socially Responsible Branding

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Consumer Behavior, Diversity (undergraduate)
  • Consumer Behavior (professional MBA)

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Trump, Rebecca K., and Kevin P. Newman (forthcoming), “When do Unethical Brand Perceptions Spillover to Competitors?” Marketing Letters.
  • Trump, Rebecca K. (2014), “Connected Consumers' Responses to Negative Brand Actions: The Roles of Transgression Self-Relevance and Domain,” Journal of Business Research, 67 (9), 1824-1830.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Member, Enhancement of Teaching and Learning Committee
  • Creator and Coordinator of the Marketing Department’s Experiment/Study Participant Recruiting System and Subject Pool

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

One of the key factors that attracted me to Loyola was the institution’s Jesuit Mission. That mission was incredibly synergistic with the approach I had begun to develop toward research and teaching, which made Loyola a great fit with my personal and professional values. Since being at Loyola, the values inherent in the mission have become ingrained in my teaching and research, and my approach to service to the University has followed suit.

Back to the Top