Loyola University Maryland

Accomplished Greyhounds

Attainments 2011-12

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Loyola celebrates the attainments of its faculty members who were recently promoted and tenured.

During the 2011-12 academic year, two Loyola faculty members were promoted and seven were tenured and promoted. Their accomplishments will continue to strengthen student learning experiences, and their scholarly contributions will continue to enrich human and universal understanding and experience.

The profiles of these distinguished faculty members, which follow, describe the faculty members' areas of expertise and give insight into their most significant and rewarding career dimensions.

BurgerJohn D. Burger

Tenured and Promoted

Professor of Economics

Research Interests

  • International Finance
  • Monetary Policy
  • Sports Economics

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • EC430 Monetary Economics
  • EC440 International Financial Economics
  • EF664 Global Macroeconomics

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Emerging Local Currency Bond Markets” (with F.E. Warnock and V.C. Warnock), Financial Analysts Journal 68(4): 73-93, July 2012.
  • “Is America’s Pastime Too Time Consuming?” (with Stephen J.K. Walters), Economics Letters 116(2): 204-206, May 2012.
  • “External capital structures and oil price volatility,” (with A. Rebucci, F.E. Warnock and V.C. Warnock), Journal of Business, Finance and Economics in Emerging Economies 5(2): 1-37, December 2010.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Economics Department Chair
  • Director of Loyola International Nachbahr Huis (Leuven)
  • NCAA Faculty Athletics Representative

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Loyola has provided a wide variety of teaching opportunities – from first-year principles to economics majors to executive MBAs. The wide variety of audiences provides both challenges and rewarding experiences. I am also grateful for Loyola’s support of my research through professional development funding, summer grants, and sabbaticals. Thanks to Loyola’s support I have been able to present my research to academics and policymakers around the world.

Jonathan Lillie

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Communication

Research Interests

I study a range of cultures and phenomena connected to digital media including online journalism; web-based communities and communication strategies; and the technology narratives of past eras.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Digital Media Senior Capstone
  • News Reporting and Writing
  • Introduction to Communication

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Lillie, J. (2012). Nokia's MMS: A cultural analysis of mobile picture messaging. New Media & Society. Issue pending.
  • Lillie, J. (2011). How and Why Journalists Create Audio Slideshows: An exploratory study of multimedia adoption. Journalism Practice, 5(3), 350-365.
  • Auman, A., and Lillie, J. (2008). An Evaluation of Team-Teaching Models in a Media Convergence Curriculum. Journalism & Mass Communication Educator, 62 (4) 360-375.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  •  Managing editor of the peer-reviewed journal, NMEDIAC: The Journal of New Media & Culture
  • Elected Humanities representative to the Faculty Compensation Committee
  • Teach several service-learning courses

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Park Doctoral Fellow at the University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill 200-2004

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

I value and enjoy the many opportunities available at Loyola to engage fully in teaching, service and research. At many colleges and universities one or two of these areas are at least partially neglected, but at Loyola I have found that they are all nurtured. The level of community connectedness, comradery and cordiality has also been first rate. I love my department, my school, the campus, and the town, and am excited to be a part of it all as a tenured associate professor.

LitchkaPeter Litchka

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Education Specialties

Research Interests

My research has focused in the support of aspiring and current school leaders in the contemporary high-stakes, high accountability environment in education.  In particular, my work has addressed the human side of school leadership as it relates to stress, gender issues, decision-making, and politics, as well as providing theory and practice in the area of instructional leadership for school leaders.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • AD662 Leadership, Supervision, and Professional Development
  • AD681 Organizational Development
  • AD683 Leadership Theories and Practices

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Litchka, P. (2011). A vision of excellence: Exemplary leadership practices of principals from high poverty, high achieving schools. Education Leadership Review, 12(2), 11-19.
  • Litchka, P. (April, 2009).  Learning to Lead, Leading to Learn. Invited Guest Speaker. Mehmet Akif Ersoy University; Burdur, Turkey.
  • Polka, W. & Litchka, P. (2008).  The dark side of leadership: Superintendents and the professional victim syndrome. New York: Rowman & Littlefield Education.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Collaborating with the Archdiocese of Baltimore Schools Division in the development and implementation of the Catholic Schools Leadership Cohorts (2) and the Principals’ Leadership Institute for Advance Study (PLIAS), collaboration among the Archdiocese, Mount St. Mary’s College, the College of Notre Dame, and Loyola University Maryland to provide current Catholic school principals with additional theory and practice in school leadership.
  • Being invited to speak, a principal mentor, and a facilitator professional development for more than fifteen different schools and organizations within the Baltimore metropolitan area.
  • School Board Member (6 year term), Immaculate Conception School, Towson, MD.
  • Chair, Strategic Planning Committee.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Junior Faculty Sabbatical: The Instructional Leadership Abilities of Principals in High Achieving, High Poverty Urban Schools (2010).
  • Faculty Fellow on Service-Learning and Engaged Scholarship (2008).

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

During the past decade or so, K-12 education has evolved into high-stakes, high accountability environment based upon the results of standardized teaching, learning, and testing. However, Loyola University Maryland’s School of Education has never lost sight of the human side of education when it comes to preparing teachers and school leaders. I am thrilled to be teaching, being involved in research and scholarly activity, and providing service in an environment that practices Cura Personalis  and an emphasis on social justice in all aspects of our work.

Brian Norman

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of English

Research Interests

I study twentieth-century and contemporary American literature, especially African American, feminist, and protest traditions. I am especially interested in the relationship between literature and social change.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Dead Women Talking, a special section of EN379 Gender in American Literature
  • EN379 African American Literature, a new addition to the curriculum at Loyola in which students study black literature and follow one of four paths: Public Servant, Public Intellectual, Cultural Citizen, or Scholar
  • Imagining Justice and Injustice in Literature, an alpha section of EN101 Introduction to Literature

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Neo-segregation Narratives: Jim Crow in Post-Civil Rights American Literature (University of Georgia Press, 2010)
  • Representing Segregation: Toward an Aesthetics of Living Jim Crow, and Other Forms of Racial Division (SUNY Press, 2010), co-edited with Piper Kendrix Williams
  • The American Protest Essay and National Belonging: Addressing Division (SUNY Press, 2007)

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Inaugural director of the new program in African and African American Studies
  • Elected to the Modern Language Association (MLA) executive committee for the Division on Nonfiction Prose
  • Active participant in the Radnor-Winston Community Garden, which broke ground in October 2010 on Loyola-owned land just off York Road

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Outstanding Recent Alumnus, Pacific Lutheran University (2009)
  • Center for the Humanities, Research Fellowship, Wesleyan University (2008)
  • Idaho Humanities Council, Research Fellowship (2008)

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

I came to Loyola because I was excited to return to my liberal arts roots to develop fully as a scholar-teacher. The Jesuit focus on academic excellence, social justice, and care for the whole person seems particularly well-suited to cultivate what the twenty-first century most needs: scholar-citizens. Scholar-citizens can engage our most pressing questions--be they academic, moral, social, philosophical, religious, or political--with sincere thought and intellectual rigor, habits developed in the humanities classroom. In the Loyola classroom, I can introduce literary figures such as James Baldwin who model scholar-citizenship as both lucid thinkers and advocates for American social movements.

WrenGloria Phillips-Wren

Promoted

Professor of Information Systems and Operations Management

Research Interests

Dr. Phillips-Wren’s research interests are in theory and applications of decision making and support, analytics, business intelligence, intelligent systems, and data mining. She is also interested in strategic uses of emerging technologies such as social media.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Data Mining and Business Intelligence
  • Information Technology Strategy for Executives
  • Global Information Technology

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Phillips-Wren, G., Mora, M., Forgionne, G. and Gupta, J. (2009).  An integrative evaluation framework for intelligent decision support systems. European Journal of Operational Research, June 16, 195 (3), 642-652.
  • Phillips-Wren, G., Jain, L., Nakamatsu, K., and Howlett, R. Eds. (2010).  Advances in Intelligent Decision Technologies, Springer Publishing Company: Berlin Heidelberg, ISBN-13: 978-3-642-146152.
  • Invited Keynote Speaker, “Intelligent Decision Making,” Presented at the Knowledge-Based Intelligent Information and Engineering Systems 12th International Conference, Zagreb, Croatia, September 2008.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Chair, Information Systems and Operations Management, July 2008 - present
  • Academic Director of Executive Programs, July 2010 - present
  • Vice-Chair and Chair-elect of SIGDSS, the Special Interest Group about Decision Support and Analytical Information Systems affiliated with the Association for Information Systems (AIS), the leading global academic organization for Information Systems, 2011-13

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Standoff Detection, Cooperative Research with the University of South Australia, 2007
  • Loyola University Summer Research Award, 2010
  • Sellinger Summer Research Award 2010

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The intellectual community of scholars and students grounded in Jesuit ideals is most rewarding to me as a faculty member at Loyola.  Loyola has challenged me to reach higher in scholarship and make a difference for others, while offering the support of cura personalis. The people of Loyola make me look forward to going to work and doing my part to contribute to the community.

SedgleyNorman Sedgley

Promoted

Professor of Economics

Research Interests

  • Economic growth and applied time series econometrics

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • EC 301 Macroeconomics
  • EC 305 Mathematical Economics
  • EC446 International Trade

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “The dynamic properties of steady state equilibrium in lab equipment semi endogenous and fully endogenous growth models with expanding sectors,” Forthcoming in Macroeconomic Dynamics
  • “Reinterpreting the Jones critique, A time Series Approach to Testing and Understanding Idea Driven Growth Models with Transitional dynamics” The Journal of Macroeconomics, 32, 2010, 103-117
  • “Prison’s Dilemma: Do Education and Jobs Programs Affect Recidivism?” Economica, 77, 307, July 2010, 49-517

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Sellinger Assessment Coordinator 2006-2011
  • Core Advisor 2001-2013

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

It is a privilege to work at Loyola University Maryland. The most rewarding aspect of my time at Loyola is working with our economics majors in their upper level courses. It is a joy to see students who are genuinely interested in looking into the questions asked in more advanced macroeconomics and it is a joy to see in them a willingness to apply more advanced modeling techniques in attempting to answer these questions. Another highlight of my professional life is working with a supportive, energetic, and collegial group of economists, many of whom I continue to collaborate with in research as well as endeavors in the classroom.

SickingRev. Joseph A. Stewart-Sicking, Ed.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Pastoral Counseling

Research Interests

In my applied research, I examine the spiritual and work-related well-being of those who see themselves as having a calling, especially clergy. Theoretically, I am interested in expanding the horizons of counseling through examining its boundary with spiritual direction and the care of souls.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • PC676 Counseling Theory and Practice
  • PC704 Group Spiritual Guidance
  • PC950 Psychospiritual Approaches to Clinical Issues

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Stewart-Sicking, J. A. & Mutai, W. W. (2012). Counseling in context: Faith based communities. In Cook, E.P. (ed.), Counseling people in context: The ecological perspective in counseling. Alexandria, VA: American Counseling Association.
  • Stewart-Sicking, J. A. & Shaia, A. J. (2011). Facing change: Lessons from the Gospel of Matthew. Human Development, 33(2), 25-29.
  • Stewart-Sicking, J. A. Ciarrocchi, J. W., Hollensbe, E. C. & Sheep, M. L. (2011). Workplace characteristics, career/vocation satisfaction, and existential well-being in Episcopal clergy, Mental Health, Religion & Culture, 14(7), 715-730. doi: 10.1080/13674676.2010.516428.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Loyola Committee on Engaged Scholarship
  • Council on Accrediting of Counseling and Related Education Programs: Site Visitor
  • Episcopal Diocese of Maryland: Sacramental Supply Priest

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • CREDO/Church Pension Fund: Grant for developing Clergy Wellness Profile

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

For me, the most rewarding aspect of teaching at Loyola is its commitment to the Jesuit ideals liberal education and cura personalis. While my department offers professionally oriented graduate programs, Loyola’s Jesuit approach to education allows me to also foster a liberal arts orientation in my students, encouraging them to think about “big questions” and to put this wisdom into action.

Paul Tallon

Tenured and Promoted

Information Systems and Operations Management

Research Interests

  • I study ways of measuring the impacts of information technology investment on firm performance.
  • With the exponential increase in data capture and retention in corporations, I study the economics of data governance and new ways of managing large volumes of data.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • EL704 Information and Technology Management
  • IS251 Information Systems
  • IS356 IT for Financial Services

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Tallon, P. (2012) Value Chain Linkages and the Spillover Effects of Strategic IT Alignment: A Process-level View, Journal of Management Information Systems, 28 (3), 9-44.
  • Tallon, P. and Pinsonneault, A. (2011). Competing Perspectives on the Link between Strategic IT Alignment and Organizational Agility: Insights from a Mediation Model, MIS Quarterly, 35 (2), 463-486.
  • Tallon, P. (2010). A Service Science Perspective on Strategic Choice, IT, and Performance in U.S. Banking, Journal of Management Information Systems, 26 (4), 219-252.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Involvement in Students in Free Enterprise (SIFE)
  • Active member of the Sellinger Curriculum Committee 2008-2009, 2010-2012
  • Participated in the design of the Emerging Leaders MBA program, Loyola’s first full-time MBA program

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • $300,000: Legg Mason, used to fund the Sellinger School Financial Trading lab (SH102).
  • $3,000: Oracle Center Fellowship (OCEII-UCSD), used to fund undergraduate research, Spring 2009.
  • $12,500: Oracle Center Fellowship (OCEII-UCSD), Summer-Fall 2008.

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Loyola welcomes and values a balance between research, teaching, and service, thus providing an opportunity for faculty to immerse themselves in multiple areas. Loyola fosters the Jesuit spirit in everything we do as faculty, from working on complex research to engaging with students in classroom activities. Loyola provides an enriching environment for broad personal development like few other universities. Loyola is truly a special place to work and an even more special place to learn, something that applies to both students and faculty.

ZhangQiyu (Jason) Zhang

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Marketing

Research Interests

Customer management in both consumer and business markets with an emphasis placed on quantifying various effects of customers (e.g., customer word-of-mouth, satisfaction, and loyalty).

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • EM704 Strategic Marketing (EMBA)
  • GB661 Marketing Management (MBA)
  • MK452 Services Marketing (Undergraduate)

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Yue Pan and Jason Q. Zhang (2011), “Born Unequal: Understanding Helpfulness of Consumer Product Reviews,” Journal of Retailing, 87 (4), 598-612.
  • Athaide, Gerard A. and Jason Q. Zhang (2011), “The Determinants of Seller-Buyer Interactions during New Product Development in Technology-Based, Industrial Markets,” Journal of Product Innovation Management, 28 (S1), 146-158.
  • Zhang, Jason Q., Georgiana Craciun, and Dongwoo Shin (2010), “When Does Electronic Word-of-Mouth Matter? A Study of Online Consumer Product Reviews,” Journal of Business Research, 63 (12), 1336-1341.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Undergraduate Student Research and Scholarship Colloquium (USRSC) Committee Co-Chair
  • The Sellinger School Faculty Development Task Force
  • Faculty Advisor to the Marketing Honorary Society Mu Kappa Tau

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Research Grant from the Marketing Science Institute (MSI) and the Wharton School Interactive Media Initiative, University of Pennsylvania, “Electronic Word-of-Mouth and its Persuasiveness,” 2009
  • Research Grant from the Lattanze Center of Information Management Systems, “Consumer Perception of Online Product Ratings,” 2008
  • Loyola University Summer Research Grant, 2011, 2009, and 2008

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Loyola’s Jesuit identity provides me with an ideal setting to develop both professionally and personally. The emphasis placed on academic excellence fosters an environment that values both teaching and research. The supporting resources (e.g., regular teaching workshops on campus and research presentations twice a month at the Sellinger School) encourage the best teaching and research possible. Collaborative colleagues, dedicated administrators and staff, and appreciative students create a welcoming and caring community within which I find my work rewarding and fulfilling.