Loyola University Maryland

Public Safety

Section9

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9. Educational Programs

Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaigns:

Educational programs to prevent and to promote the awareness of rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking are offered at New Student Orientation, in new employee orientation, in residence hall floor meetings, and on campus throughout the academic year. Such prevention and awareness programs include a statement that the University prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct, provides definitions of the various types of prohibited sexual misconduct as well as the definition and meaning of consent, safe and positive options for bystander intervention, and information on risk reduction to recognize warning signs of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks. Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking means comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking that—

(A) Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and

(B) Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels.

Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking include both primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns directed at students and employees.

Subject Codes:

CP

Crime Prevention

SA

Sexual Assault

FS

Fire Safety

AS

Active Shooter

LENS

Loyola Emergency Notification System

ST

Stalking

DV

Domestic Violence

DAV

Dating Violence

BI

Bystander Intervention

SM

Sexual Misconduct

GE

Gender Equality

CON

Consent

ADA

Alcohol and drug awareness

RRSA

Risk reduction and safety awareness

The Department of Public Safety (DPS) conducts “in service” training twice a year.  Once during the months of May and June and once over the Christmas holiday in December.  Our summer training includes exercises to put our emergency responders, Public Safety officers, Student Life, Baltimore Police and other appropriate internal and external departments / divisions through procedures we expect to use during a crisis event.

Department of Public Safety: Annual in-service training

Date/ Location

Topic(s)

1/7-1/8/15 5104 York Road

Cultural Diversity and Sensitivity, Domestic Violence and Stalking

5/19-21/15 Flannery O’Connor Classroom

Emergency Response, Campus Evacuation, Timely Warnings, Mass Notifications, 1st Aid/CPR/AED Recertification, Fire Response

5/26-28/15 Flannery O’Connor Classroom

Emergency Response, Campus Evacuation, Timely Warnings, Mass Notifications, 1st Aid/CPR/AED Recertification, Fire Response

Public Safety conducted classroom instruction on how Campus Police would evacuate the campus for various serious events.  This was focused training on many different events that could cause the university to have to evacuate some or all of campus.  Most of the emergency situations that are naturally occurring were discussed along with active shooter, civil disturbance, Power outage, and Gas leaks. 

Primary Prevention and Awareness Programs for 1st Year Students

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Prohibited Behavior Covered

Summer Orientation

06/16 – 27/2015

McGuire Hall

CP

Realities of University

06/16 – 27/2015

McManus Theater

SA/SM/CP

Think About it

All Summer 2015

Online

SA/SM/CP/DAV/ST/DV

First year Orientation

08/27/2015

Main Campus various

SM/DAV/CON/SA/ST/ADA/FS/RRSA

International Students

8/27

Sellinger Hall

SA/DAV/ST/SM

Safety on Campus for incoming International students

8/26

Sellinger Hall

CP/FS/RRSA

Know More: Building a community of consent

8/28/15

Reitz Arena

CON

Residence hall floor meetings

Beginning of Fall semester

Residence Halls

SA/DAV/ST/SM/DV/FS/RRSA/ADA

Messina

1st Year

Residential Halls

SA/SM/DAV

Personal Safety Abroad

4/17, 12/4

McGuire Hall

CP/FS

Primary Prevention and Awareness Programs for New Employees

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Prohibited Behavior Covered

Employee Orientation

Weekly

5000 York Road

FS/RRSA

Title IX Responsible Employee

Ongoing

Online

SM/SA/ST/DV/DAV/CON

Sexual Harassment

1/22; 5/1; 8/18; 11/18

McGuire Hall

SM

Ongoing Awareness and Prevention Programs for Students

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Topics Covered

Safety (relational violence is covered as well as psychological well-being in general)

Fall Orientation 9/2015

Student Center

DAV/DV

Take Back the Night

4/10/2015

Hopkins Court

SA

Green Dot Bystander Training

4/5; 10/10-11; 11/7-8 Ongoing training throughout the year

Sellinger VIP, Hopkins Lounge’ Flannery O’Connor Hall

Various locations

SA/DV/DAV/BI

Green Dot Overview Speech

1/26; 2/3; 3/7; 8/20/ 8/268/2015

Cohn Hall, Knott Hall, McGuire Hall

SA/DV/DAV/ST/BI

Graduate Student Orientation

Prior to each Semester

E-mail

SA/DV/DAV/ST

It’s On Us

10/3; 10/10; 10/24

Distributed resource cards and t-shirts

SA/DV/DAV/ST

One Love Escalation Workshop

4/273/22/2015; 8/24/2015; 12/16/2015

Student Center Messina classrooms

SA/DV/DAV/ST/BI

Escalation

Ongoing training throughout the year

Various locations

DV/DAV

Men as Allies

4/2015

Quad and Poster Campaign

SA

Women and Alcohol

4/14/2014

Hopkins Court

SA

Title IX: Responsible Employee for Student Staff

11/20/15

College Center

SA/DV/DAV/ST

Title IX: Responsible Employee for Graduate Program Operations Coordinators

2/13/15

College Center

SA/DV/DAV/ST

Diversity Reading Group: Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

10/2015

College Center

SA/DV/DAV

1 is 2 Many

Ongoing

Online Video

SA

Rape Myths Poster Campaign

9/2015

Poster Campaign

DAV/SA/ST

Ongoing Awareness and Prevention Programs for Employees

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Topics Covered

Red Flag

11/2015

Poster Program

SA/DAV/ST

Take Back the Night

4/2015

Various locations

SA

Green Dot

Ongoing throughout the year

Various locations

SA/DAV/DV/BI

Diversity Reading Group: Missoula: Rape and the Justice System in a College Town

10/2015

College Center

SA/DV/DAV

Warning Signs

8/2015

5104 Conference Room

Safety and Security/CP

Responsible Employee Training: Athletics, Messina Faculty and Mentors

Ongoing, 1/8/15; 1/13/15

Online

Title IX: Responsible Employee Training

Active Shooter Response

1/8, 3/3, 10/12, 10/14, 10/19, 11/16, 11/18

Various locations throughout all campuses

AS

Campus Security Authority

3/5, 3/24, 3/25, 3/26, 3/27, 3/31, 4/1, 5/13, Online

Humanities

SA/DV/DAV/SM

Workplace Violence

8/25

College Center

CP/DV/DAV/SM/ST

Title IX Investigator

6/2-3/15; 12/8-9

College Center;

SA/DAV/DV/ST

Crime prevention is a cooperative effort requiring the entire Loyola community to actively participate in identifying conditions for criminal opportunity. The Department of Public Safety, The Department of Student Development and/or the Office of Student Life, the Women’s Center, and the Office of Student Support and Wellness offer a variety of safety, security and crime prevention programs throughout the year. Issues of personal safety, residential security and office safety are the responsibility of the entire Loyola community. Loyola’s “Good Hound” campaign is an example of Loyola promoting personal and community responsibility in the Jesuit tradition for self and others.

Crime prevention, safety education and security awareness programs are conducted by various Loyola departments throughout the year and average out to about one per month. These educational programs range from personal safety and self-defense to sexual assault prevention and awareness. The Department of Public Safety, the Office of Student Life, the Department of Environmental Health and Safety, Human Resources and the Office of Support and Wellness provide primary prevention, risk reduction, and ongoing awareness programs to address topics such as personal safety, alcohol and drug abuse awareness, fire safety and sexual assault prevention available to students and staff member throughout the year. As part of the security awareness programs, students and employees are encouraged to be responsible for their own security and the security of others.

The Department also offers “Operation Identification” which is a program designed to help protect valuables, by engraving the personal driver’s license number of owners onto such items as televisions, computers, bikes as well as other items of property and creating a written inventory (including model and serial numbers.) Additionally, DPS’s recommends a free app called “My Property Locker” which is a cloud based secure database, Loyola community members can utilize to keep a record of ownership for all personal belongings. The primary focus of the website and mobile application is to allow users to store and access their personal property’s serial numbers in a safe place. By having your property’s serial number along with a detailed description of the property, police departments around the nation become enabled to accurately track recovered goods and get them returned to their rightful owners. Visit the My Property locker website at www.mypropertylocker.com

Overview of Education Programs:

Throughout every year, various Loyola departments offer numerous programs on sexual assault prevention and awareness open to all members of the Loyola community. Every year during the month of April, the Women’s Center, Health Center, DPS, and members of the student government co-sponsor Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Programs on sexual assault prevention and awareness are conducted throughout the month.  Numerous programs on safety awareness and crime prevention are offered annually for students and employees.

Think about it: All 1st year students are required to complete “Think About it” prior to their arrival on campus. Think About It prepares college students for the unique challenges and responsibilities of college life. Focusing on minimizing risks associated with alcohol, drugs, and sexual violence, Think About It takes a harm reduction approach that resonates with students and results in a healthy campus culture. The program uses the latest prevention techniques and science-based research to educate students about the impact of alcohol on the mind and body and on the importance of healthy relationships. Whether or not you drink alcohol, Think About It will empower you to make well-informed decisions and to better cope with the drinking behavior of peers.

Warning Signs: Warning signs is a 15 minute fast-paced video presentation on the key aspects of system security for Loyola’s transportation employee, which takes place every August. The program focuses on increasing shuttle driver’s awareness of what to look for and what to do regarding suspicious activity, packages, devices and substances. This program aids in improving overall security on our shuttle system while helping to reduce occurrences of crime on campus.

Active Shooter Response: Active Shooter Response is a program designed to provide awareness for students and employees in case they were to ever find themselves in a hostile situation. The programs highlights steps individuals need to be aware of in order to increase their chances of survival in an active shooter incident. The program is presented in three parts, run, hide or fight and provides participants with tools on way to flee a situation, sheltering in place and techniques on disarming a shooter as a last resort. This program is offered to any department or student group upon request and publicly to the community annually.

Run, Hide, Fight Video: Run, hide, fight is an online video similar to DPS’s active shooter presentation on how to react in the event of an active shooter incident. The video is available 24/7 by accessing a link from the DPS website.

RAD: Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) program for the women of the University. R.A.D. is a system of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques combined with instruction on risk reduction, prevention and avoidance of sexual assault. The program, conducted each semester, provides women with the knowledge to make educated and informed decisions about sexual assault prevention.

Title IX Responsible Employee Training: A “responsible employee” has the duty to report harassment or other types of misconduct, is someone a student could reasonably believe has this authority or responsibility to react to reported sexual harassment and/or misconduct and could be any Loyola community member including faculty, administrators, staff, GAs, RAs, coaches, and trainers, in other words, this is YOU. As such, the University is obligated to ensure that you are trained regarding your obligation to report sexual harassment/assault/ or misconduct.  Title IX responsible employee is a one hour online course all employees of the Loyola community is required to take annually.

Workplace Violence Training: Workplace Violence training is a one training session provided for supervisors and employees annually. This training presents, Loyola University’s policy on workplace violence, provides definitions of various aspects of workplace violence, identifies the supervisor’s role in identifying situations of concern, outlines reporting procedures for supervisors and staff members and provides techniques for crisis resolution and de-escalation processes as well as counseling available to members of the Loyola community.

Green Dot: Green Dot is a bystander intervention program built on the premise that in order to measurably reduce power-based personal violence, including sexual violence, partner violence, or stalking, a cultural shift is necessary. In order to create a cultural shift, a critical mass of people will need to engage in a new behavior or set of behaviors that will make violence less sustainable within any given community. The “new behavior” is a green dot. The only two choices facing each of us in keeping our community safe, are (1) to do something, or (2) to do nothing. Both of these choices have profound implications. A choice to do nothing is a choice to allow the violence to continue on our campus.  Our training is based on the belief that the greatest power is in the bystander – each one of us. Through our choices, we can define the norms and ultimately decide what we will accept and not accept in our community. Green Dot training will provide you with the knowledge and tools needed in order to be an active bystander and ultimately keep our campus safe.

Take Back the Night: Loyola’s annual Take Back the Night Rally: join various speakers from the Loyola community as they share their stories of survival and empowerment. A candlelight vigil will be held to honor those who have experienced sexual violence as well as an open mic portion.

1 is 2 Many: President Barack Obama’s public service announcement on rape and sexual assault awareness.

Breaking the Silence of Domestic Violence and Sexual Assault: Being physically or emotionally abused by a spouse/partner is a frightening and lonely experience. You may feel that you are the only person to whom this is happening. In reality, millions of people of all ages, gender, cultural and economic backgrounds in the United States experience domestic violence every year. Knowing that you are not the only one experiencing violence in an intimate relationship can help to free you from the shame and embarrassment you may be feeling. It also may help you understand that the abuse does not occur because you are doing something “wrong,” or that you do something to cause it to happen.

Red Flags: Loyola poster campaign for sexual assault awareness.

It’s On Us: Student Government participated in “It’s On Us,” a national campaign to raise awareness about sexual assault on college campuses. Student government representatives distributed resource cards and t-shirts and created a video to encourage students to join the campaign and sign the pledge. The SGA President attended the launch of the campaign at the White House.

Sexual Assault Awareness Week: April 7-11 A week of programs designed to bring awareness to issues of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking. The week culminates in the annual Take Back The Night Program.

Title IX / Sexual Assault: Enhancing Campus Response, Investigations and Adjudications Training Program for Loyola University Maryland- by Margolis   Healy.   This two day seminar was offered to fulfil the yearly training requirement for investigators and adjudicators.  The training consisted of an overview of Title IX and institutional obligations to provide fair, equitable and trauma informed approach to the investigation and adjudication of sexual violence incidents at the University.  Specific interview techniques and strategies were shared with the participants.       

Know More: Building a community of consent – Presentation by Katsura Kurita and Chelsey Puzzanghero ’16 on August 28, 2015 for first year students in Reitz Auditorium during Fall Orientation.  The goal of the presentation was to explore the meaning of consent, along with the importance of affirming agreement regarding sexual decision making for healthy relationships within the spirit of our Jesuit values.

Rape Myths Panel and Poster Campaign – In collaboration with SGA, Women’s Center, and the Dean of Students Office, a poster campaign of rape myths was created and shared with the campus community during the first four weeks of the fall semester.  The poster campaign culminated in a program called “It’s On Us: Ending Rape Myths” which was held on Wednesday, October 7, 2015 from 7 p.m.  A panel consisting of Dr. Amanda Konradi, Dr. Patrick Brugh, Melissa Lees, Emily Brookshire, Ryan Blake, and Chelsey Puzzanghero.

Bystander and Risk Reduction information

Bystander Intervention

Loyola University Maryland strives to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm.  We may not always know what to do, even if we want to help. Listed below are some ways to be an active bystander. If you or someone is in immediate danger, dial 911. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. Bystanders are “individuals who observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. Bystanders are not directly involved but have the choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it.” Loyola University Maryland strives to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. We may not always know what to do, even if we want to help. Listed below are some ways to be an active bystander. If you or someone is in immediate danger, dial 911. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.

  • Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are okay.
  • Confront people who seclude, hit on, and try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated.
  • Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.
  • Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
  • Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or with legal assistance.

 Risk Reduction awareness

With no intent to victim blame and recognizing that only abusers are responsible for their abuse, the following are some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network, www.rainn.org)

  • Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you, may help you to find a way to get out of a bad situation.
  • Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one around.
  • Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
  • Trust your instincts. If a situation or location feels unsafe or uncomfortable, it probably isn’t the best place to be.
  • Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.
  • Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money. Loyola DPS recommends establishing an Uber or Lyft account. Links to both organizations can be found on the Loyola transportation and parking webpage.
  • Don’t allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
  • Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
  • When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the evening, and leave together. Knowing where you are and who is around you may help you to find a way out of a bad situation.
  • Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.).
  • Don’t leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you’ve left your drink, just get a new one.
  • Don’t accept drinks from people you don’t know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties, don’t drink from punch bowls or other large common containers.
  • Watch out for your friends and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get her or him to  a safe place immediately.
  • If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact local law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.). Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).
  • If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:
  • Remember that being in this situation in not your fault. You did not do anything wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
  • Be true to yourself. Don’t feel obligated to do anything you don’t want to do. “I don’t want to” is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.
  • Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends and family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.
  • Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
  • Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of a room? Where are the doors and windows?  Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
  • If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgement before doing anything you may regret later.

The University engages in comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault and stalking that: are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research, or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community and societal levels. 

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