Loyola University Maryland

Public Safety

Annual-Security-Report

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Important Notice

This is a copy of Loyola University’s Annual Security and Fire Safety Report.  This report includes statistics for the previous three years concerning reported crimes that occurred on campus; in certain off-campus buildings or property owned or controlled by Loyola University;  and on public property within, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.  The report also includes institutional policies concerning campus security, such as policies concerning sexual assault, and fire safety policies.  You can obtain a printed copy of this report by contacting the Department of Public Safety or Environmental Health and Safety at 410-617-2000.

The crime and resident hall fire statistics for 2010, 2011, and 2012 can also be found at the end of this report.

1.  Campus Overview

  Loyola University Maryland has been an integral part of higher education in Baltimore since 1852.  The primary campus has been located in the northern portion of Baltimore City, and is situated on a well-lit campus surrounded by residential and light commercial properties.  The campus has expanded several times, and now encompasses approximately sixty-five acres of land and more than forty buildings, ranging from small one-story cottages to two nine-story residential towers.  In 2009, the Ridley Athletic Complex was opened at 2221 West Cold Spring Lane providing another 80 acres of land and a 6000 seat capacity stadium.  The Evergreen Campus is located at 4501 North Charles Street in Baltimore, Maryland. The satellite campuses are located in the Metropolitan Baltimore area:

            a. Loyola University Graduate Center

Columbia Campus

8890 McGaw Road

Columbia, MD 21045-4743

The Columbia campus provides administrative and classroom space for graduate programs in Business Management, Education, Engineering Science, Modern Studies, Pastoral Counseling, and Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology.  Loyola occupies thirty-three thousand square feet of this fifty-two thousand square foot facility.   Police services are provided by the Howard County Police Department who are the first responders to the building’s alarm system and 911 police emergency calls.  Contracted security officers and Graduate students provide onsite security during key instructional periods on the campus and Campus Police monitor the electronic door card-access, closed circuit television (CCTV) and building alarm systems in the Campus Police Communications Center at the Baltimore Evergreen Campus.  In cooperation with the Howard County Police Department, Loyola’s Department of Public Safety conducts follow-up investigations of reported incidents. 

     

b. Loyola University Graduate Center

Timonium Campus

2034 Greenspring Drive

Timonium, Maryland 21093

The Graduate Center at Timonium is a 65,000 square foot academic center that provides administrative offices and high-tech, state of the art classroom space for the programs in the Education, Graduate Business Programs, Computer Science, Speech-Language Pathology and Audiology Departments.  Security at the Center is staffed by members of the Department of Public Safety who have responsibility for on-site monitoring of the electronic door card-access system and the closed circuit television.  A Campus Police officer has been added to the daily security mission at Timonium.  This officer is the first responder to all incidents that occur at that campus.  Monitored Access and CCTV control systems are conducted at the Campus Police Communications Center.  The Baltimore County Police Department responds to 911 emergency calls.  The county police and the University’s Department of Public Safety work in partnership to implement crime prevention strategies.   

c. Loyola University Clinical Centers

Belvedere Square

5911 York Road, Suite 100

Baltimore MD  21212

 

The Loyola University Clinical Center at Belvedere Square, located near York Road and Northern Parkway, offers individuals living in the Baltimore metropolitan area a broad range of services addressing educational, language, and psychological issues.  Individuals requiring these broad range services will find a comprehensive, affordable and professional environment for their evaluation and treatment.

All sites, including the Ridley Athletic Complex, are well-lit and equipped with the latest security technology including CCTV surveillance, blue light emergency phones in parking lots and the campus-wide electronic card-access door entry system.  Security patrols are conducted by the on-site Public Safety Officers, Off - Duty Baltimore Police Officers and private security companies.

2.  Campus Police Authority

The Department of Public Safety is the agency charged with the protection and preservation of peace and good order on the property owned, leased or rented by Loyola University Maryland.  The Campus Police officers are commissioned as Special Police Officers by the Maryland State Police and are vested under Article 41, Section 4-905 of the Annotated Code of Maryland, with full law enforcement powers on the property owned, leased, or otherwise under the control of Loyola University Maryland. The department enjoys an excellent working relationship with the Baltimore Police who patrol the areas surrounding the Evergreen Campus.  Through a liaison with other local police agencies, the Department monitors and records all criminal activity at Loyola’s campuses in the respective jurisdictions of the Baltimore Metropolitan Area.

Campus Police have complete police authority to apprehend and arrest anyone involved in illegal acts on campus and its immediately adjacent areas. If offenses violating Loyola University rules and regulations or Community Standards are committed by a student, the Campus Police will also refer the individual to the disciplinary judicial process that Student Development administers.  Through coordination with local law enforcement agencies, any criminal activity engaged in by students at off-campus locations is monitored and recorded.  This information is provided to the Dean of Students’ Office for any action or follow-up that may be required.

The Director of Public Safety reports directly to the Vice President for Administration who in turn reports to the Executive Vice President of the University.  The Director is responsible for the achievement of the Department’s mission and is dedicated to the implementation of benchmark standards for campus law enforcement as established by the International Association of Campus Law Enforcement Administrators (IACLEA) in which the Department holds membership. 

If a Loyola student is involved in an off-campus offense, Campus Police officers may assist with the investigation in cooperation with Northern District, Baltimore Police Department (BPD).  BPD routinely works and communicates with campus officers on any serious incident occurring on campus or in the immediate neighborhood or business areas surrounding campus.  Loyola University operates no off-campus housing or off-campus student organizations.  However, many students live in the neighborhoods surrounding Loyola.  While BPD has primary jurisdiction in these areas, Campus Police can and does respond in an administrative capacity to student related incidents that occur in close proximity to campus.

   

3.  Policy for Reporting the Annual Disclosure of Crime Statistics

The Department of Public Safety prepares The Annual Security Report “Clery Report” to comply with the 1990 Congress approved Crime Awareness and Campus Security Act which amended the Higher Education Act of 1965.  The Jeanne Clery Act requires higher education institutions to make public their campus security policies, and it requires that crime data are collected, reported, and disseminated to the campus community.  The Clery Act is intended to provide prospective students and employees, current students and their families, and the rest of the University community accurate, complete, and timely information about safety on campus so that they can make informed decisions.  The full text of this report can be located on our website at  http://www.loyola.edu/department/publicsafety/reporting/clery-act.aspx

This report is prepared in cooperation with Baltimore Police Department, Howard County Police Department, and the Baltimore County Police Department.  Additionally, our internal organizations: Student Life, Student Development, Counseling Center, and Alcohol and Drug Education and Support Services, all contribute greatly to the overall judicial process and its success.  Each entity provides updated information on their efforts and programs to comply with the Act.  Campus crime, arrest and referral statistics include those matters reported to the Campus Police, designated campus officials and local law enforcement agencies.  These statistics may also include crimes that have occurred in private residences or businesses which are not required to be reported.  A procedure is in place to anonymously capture crime statistics disclosed confidentially.  Each year an email notification, phone mail bulletin and a Newshound notice announce the location of where to view or receive the completed report.  These alert notifications are made to students, faculty, staff and administrators.  Prospective students and employees at Loyola receive information where they can view the statistics from the Admissions Office and the Human Recourses Department respectively.

4.  List of Officials with Significant Responsibility for Student and Campus Activities

  Although we encourage the reporting of campus criminal activity directly to the Campus Police Department, in some instances members of the campus community may choose to file a report with one of the other Campus Security Authorities.  A Campus Security Authority is an official of an institution who has significant responsibility for student and campus activities, including but not limited to, student housing, student discipline, and campus judicial proceedings.  An official is defined as any person who has the authority and the duty to take action or respond to particular issues on behalf of the institution.  These authorities are obligated to provide this information to the Campus Police. For reporting purposes at Loyola University, Campus Security Authorities have been designated as:

University Deans, Associate Deans, Assistants to the Dean of Students, Assistant Vice Presidents of Student Development, Director of International Programs,  Director of Graduate Admissions, Director and Associate Directors of Student Life, Director and Associate Directors of Athletics, all Head Coaches, Director and Associate Directors of Recreational Sports and the Director and Assistant Directors of Public Safety.

  University pastoral and professional counselors are encouraged to tell their clients about the reporting procedures outlined in this document.  As noted below, confidential reports / anonymous reports are extremely valuable in order to prevent further victimization and to obtain a more accurate portrait of campus crime. In certain instances, a crime victim may be reluctant to file a report fearing the process and / or loss of his/her anonymity.  In such circumstances, crime victims are encouraged to consider making a confidential report to one of the designated campus security authorities.  At a minimum, crime victims will receive valuable counseling and referral information.  Confidential reports are important because they provide valuable information that will enhance the safety of the community-at-large and they help provide a more accurate portrait of actual campus crime.

5.  Organization

   The Department of Public Safety is comprised of the Police Services Division and the Operations Support Division.  The most visible component of the Department is the Police Services Division, consisting of forty-seven sworn police officers who provide a twenty-four hour presence on the University campus using foot, bicycle and motorized patrol.  Each shift is closely supervised by a shift commander with the authority and responsibility to assure that the policies and procedures of the Department are followed.

    Campus Police Officers receive training conducted by instructors from State and local police jurisdictions who are certified by the Maryland Police and Correctional Training Commission (MPCTC).  New Officer and in-service training emphasizes conflict resolution and problem-solving techniques, sexual assault crisis and prevention, cultural diversity, community policing strategies and crime prevention techniques, as well as law enforcement and security methods.  Officers are trained and equipped in the use and handling of defensive weapons (pepper spray and the ASP baton).   Instructors from outside agencies, such as “Turn Around” (sexual assault crisis) and the Community Mediation Center are regularly included in the recruit and in-service training programs.  In-service training is conducted twice a year (summer and winter) to update and improve the skills of Campus Police officers.

   All Campus Police officers are certified National Safety Council first aid caregivers and trained on Automatic External Defibrillators (AED’s).  Recertification in these programs occurs as required.

   The Operation Support Division consists of the Campus Police Communications and the Access Control management.  The Campus Police Communications Center is the monitoring point for all 911 emergency calls, the campus emergency notification alarm system, the card key access control terminal, the closed circuit television system for more than 600 CCTV / security cameras.  Additionally, all of the campus Fire Alarm systems are housed at the Campus Police Communications Center along with our key control systems. It is staffed by trained Public Safety Officers on a twenty-four-hour basis, seven days a week and is located in the Facilities Building, Room 220.  It can be reached by calling 410-617-5010.  Access Control Management, which can be contacted by calling 410-617-2279, is responsible for 700 entry control devices and the installation and maintenance of theft and burglar alarms.

    In June 2006, Public Safety entered into an agreement with the Baltimore Police Department to hire “Off Duty” Baltimore Police Officers to provide additional coverage for our trouble spots in and around campus.  The BPD Officers retain all of their powers and responsibilities but are working directly for the leadership of the Department of Public Safety.

 

6.  Crime Prevention

   Crime Prevention is a cooperative effort requiring the entire University community to actively participate in identifying conditions for criminal opportunity.  The Department of Public Safety offers a variety of crime prevention throughout the year.

  Issues of personal safety, residential security, office safety and vehicle theft prevention are but a few of the topics presented to students by Campus Police in various formats.  Loyola conforms to the mandates of State and Federal law pertaining to victim’s rights in the handling of all cases.  To enhance community and student safety, it is recommended that after darkness falls, people should walk with friends or someone they trust or know well.  After the shuttles end transportation rounds, students are advised to call the Student Escort Program at extension 5566 for a ride.

  Using certified instructors, the Department of Public Safety conducts the Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) Program for the women of the University.  R.A.D. is a system of realistic, self-defense tactics and techniques combined with instruction on risk reduction, prevention and avoidance.  The program, conducted each semester, provides women with the knowledge to make educated decisions about sexual assault prevention.   

   Every year during the month of April, the Health Center, the Department of Public Safety, and members of the student body co-sponsor Sexual Assault Awareness Month.  Programs on sexual assault prevention and awareness are conducted throughout the month. 

    We also conduct the Watch Your Car program which is a national anti-theft program funded by the Bureau of Justice.  This is a voluntary vehicle registration program designed to deter auto theft and assist in the apprehension of auto thieves.  Registration forms and decals can be obtained at the Department of Public Safety.

   The Department also offers "Operation Identification" which is a program designed to help protect valuables, by engraving the personal driver's license number on such items as televisions, computers and the like, and creating a written inventory (including model and serial numbers).  This has proven to be a deterrent to theft and has been very helpful in returning stolen property to the rightful owner when it is recovered.

7.  Reporting and Response

  Community members, students, faculty, staff, administrators and guests are encouraged to report all crimes and public safety related incidents to the Loyola University Campus Police in a timely manner.   Incidents, suspicious circumstances, and other police-related information can be reported to an officer on patrol or by calling 410-617-5911 or 5010. The Department of Public Safety continually promotes the reporting of incidents in programs such as awareness campaigns, freshman orientation, Resident Assistant and Graduate residential crime prevention presentations and whenever the opportunity arises.

   Since timely crime reporting can be crucial to the prevention or detection of criminal activity, the University community is encouraged to report offenses promptly to campus and local police.  

   It is the policy of the Department of Public Safety to respond to all requests for police services, to write a police report, and to conduct follow-up investigations.  The Department’s Investigator coordinates investigations with the local police.  Victims of crimes against persons, such as robbery or sexual assault, are encouraged to seek confidential counseling services from the Counseling Center at extension 5109 (TDD 2143).

   The Director of Public Safety is the University’s agent for the purpose of making timely warnings and the collection of statistical data concerning criminal offenses to be included in this annual report.  Public Safety also issues periodic Incident Alert bulletins of suspicious or criminal activity occurring on and around the campus with suggestions of ways to avoid the occurrence of similar incidents.  Bulletins can be distributed to key locations around the campus and are transmitted over the University e-mail system and are posted to the Public Safety web site.  In some instances, the notices are reprinted in the students' newspaper, "The Greyhound" and in the Newshound.  All members of the University Community are urged to read these notices carefully, and to be guided by the information presented.   Anyone with information warranting a timely warning should report the circumstances to the Campus Police Office, either by phone 410-617-5010 or in person at the dispatch center on the second floor of the Facilities Building.

 

8.  Confidential Reporting Procedure

  If you are the victim of a crime and do not want to pursue action within the University’s Judicial System or the criminal justice system, you may still want to consider making a confidential report.  You can file a report on the details of the incident without revealing your identity.  The purpose of a confidential report is to comply with your wish to keep the matter confidential, while taking steps to ensure the future safety of yourself and others.  With such information, the University can keep an accurate record of the number of incidents involving students, determine where there is a pattern of crime with regard to a particular location, method, or assailant, and alert the campus community to potential danger.  Reports filed in this manner are counted and disclosed in the annual crimes statistics for the institution.  A confidential voluntary reporting system for investigative and statistical purposes entitled, “Silent Witness” is available on the Public Safety website at: https://inside.loyola.edu/publicsafety

   

9.  Campus Security Services:

            a. Uniformed Patrols

Commissioned Special Police Officers patrol on foot, on bike, or in a clearly marked Campus Police vehicle twenty-four hours a day, seven days a week.

Desk Receptionists are provided for security at the Timonium Graduate Center and at the Columbia Campus.

            b. Student Escort Program

Specially selected and trained students are employed to provide safe and reliable van and shuttle escorts on the Evergreen Campus.

            c. Electronic Surveillance and Protection

Over 600 closed circuit television cameras (CCTV) are placed at strategic locations to monitor and record the campuses of the University.  A state-of the-art network system for fire alarms in University buildings protects the campus from fire emergencies.  There is centralized 24 hour monitoring of CCTV, fire and police alarms, at the Campus Police Communications Center.  Emergency phones (over 90), equipped with one-touch dialing and designated by a blue light, are located in or within close proximity to most parking lots and walkways. All 911 emergency calls, when using the Loyola telephones, are monitored at the Campus Police Communications Center.

            d. Investigative Services

Uniformed officers are trained to conduct initial investigations using techniques to protect the victims and to preserve evidence.  The Investigator’s office provides support for victims throughout the process of any subsequent criminal or university judicial proceedings.  The Department of Public Safety maintains a close partnership with the investigative units of the Baltimore Police and the police departments of Baltimore and Howard Counties.

 

            e. Safety Education

Periodically, crime prevention programs are conducted by Campus Police, as well as local police on such topics as personal safety and sexual assault prevention.  Rape Aggression Defense (R.A.D.) training is conducted by trained and certified instructors of the Department of Public Safety.

  Loyola added emergency text messaging to the Loyola Emergency Notification System (LENS) in May 2007.  Text messaging will be used when imminent threats to the Loyola community are identified.  This is a free service; however those within the Loyola community must register to gain use of this valuable information system. To see the instructions on how to register go to the Public Safety web site at http://www.loyola.edu/department//department/publicsafety/silent-witness-form

click on e2campus.  “Incident Alerts” and “Crime Prevention Notices” are widely distributed on campus by timely postings and e-mail messages and are accessible on the Public Safety web site. They inform the University community of situations that present a potential hazard on campus or in the surrounding community.

University Incident Statistics are posted to inform the University community of all incidents reported on campus and to the Baltimore Police.

A daily log of crimes occurring on the University campus is available in the Communication Center and at 5104 York Road for review twenty-four hours a day.  The crime log can also be found on the Public Safety web site in the quick links section.    

Public Safety also conducts “Operation Lockdown.”  This program checks several hundred residence hall doors for security and records doors that are open with no one at home.  Emails are sent to those students whose rooms are left open.  There has been a significant reduction in doors that are left unlocked since the beginning of the program.

            f.   Shuttle Bus and Escort Service

The Department of Transportation provides scheduled shuttle bus service to and from the parking facilities located at York Road, the Fitness and Aquatic Center, Cathedral of Mary Our Queen and the Ridley Athletic Complex.  Many of the bus stops are equipped with emergency phones linked directly to the Campus Police Communications Center.  In addition to the shuttle system, Student Escort Program, escorts are provided by uniformed police officers and are available when other transportation resources have ended service.

 

10.  Safety and Security in the Residential Community, Access and Maintenance

  All residence halls on campus can be entered by electronic access card readers.  Selected rooms in the residence halls are equipped with a telephone with direct dial contact to the Campus Police.  The campus emergency telephone numbers are 410-617-5911 / 5010

  To enhance safety on the Evergreen Campus, each officer is assigned a particular patrol designed to maximize the visibility of the officers.   Police patrols and security are enhanced by burglar & panic alarms, closed circuit security cameras, and the DSX access control system used for access to residence halls and University buildings. Escorting students is an additional function that the Campus Police provide when other transportation means are not operating.  A Student Escort Monitor program is also available to escort students every day from 6:00 p.m. to 12:00 a.m. (3:00 a.m. on weekends).

  All laundry rooms are equipped with emergency phones that require only that the caller push the red button on the yellow phones.  Officers are dispatched to the location that is electronically displayed on the dispatcher’s phone.  Over 90 Emergency Blue Light phones are strategically placed over the campus providing a direct telephone line to the Campus Police Communications Center operator who in turn will notify the Campus Police officer responsible for that specific detail area.

  Loyola University’s main campus offers traditional residence halls, high rise residence complexes, and suite /apartment type complexes which provide on-campus housing for approximately 3000 students.  Security safeguards within the residence halls include restricted access, guest registration, and external door prop alarm systems.  Crime prevention programs include orientation workshops, individual floor meetings, residential community–wide presentations, and educational programs.  Access to University housing facilities is limited to residents, escorted guests and University staff.  Entry is monitored on a 24-hour basis through a combination of card-key security systems, conventional keys and on-duty Resident Life and work study students.  Closed Circuit Television is also used at main entrances and at security desks. 

  Professional residence hall directors and student resident advisors, who are all members of the University’s Student Life staff, live on campus and provide 24-hour staff coverage.  Student room doors should be locked at all times even when occupied.  Most importantly, residents are reminded to observe building security procedures and to notify Resident Life staff or Campus Police of any unfamiliar faces or unusual incidents within either the residence halls or apartments.    All Student Life staff members in the halls undergo comprehensive training for both prevention and response regarding safety and security issues.  As part of their responsibilities for campus security, both student and professional staff participate in lectures and seminars associated with topics such as substance abuse, prevention of sexual assault, and community security.

    

11.  Firearm Policy

  The unauthorized use, possession or storage of any weapon on University premises or at University sponsored activities is strictly forbidden.  This includes, but is not limited to firearms, air rifles, slingshots, swords, hunting knives, etc.

12.  Drug Policy

  Maryland law states that it is unlawful for any person to administer or distribute to another, or to possess (except for physician-prescribed medication), any controlled dangerous substance or controlled paraphernalia (Md. Ann. Code, Art. 27, Sec. 287). 

  Violations of the drug policy, including but not limited to the use, sale, possession and distribution of any controlled substance; the manufacture, sale, distribution, possession or use of any controlled substance on the property of the University and on non-University property used in the performance of University-related activities; and possession of drug paraphernalia, may subject a student to sanctions that include suspension or expulsion from the University.

  The drug and alcohol policy of the University is contained in a document entitled Loyola University Alcohol and Drug Program: Standards and Sanctions, Health, Information and Services. The University's official written Drug and Alcohol Policy is also contained in the Student Handbook and calendar issued annually to all students.

  Loyola University is in compliance with the Federal Drug Free Schools and Communities Act as Amendments of 1989 (Public Law 101-229) signed into law by President Bush on December 12, 1989.   The University abides by all Federal, State and/or Local Laws relating to alcohol and drugs.

13.  Alcohol Policy

  Maryland law states that it is unlawful for any person under the age of 21 to purchase, possess, transport or consume alcoholic beverages (Md. Ann. Code, Art. 2B, Sec. 3 and Article 27, Sec. 499A). In addition, it is unlawful for any person to purchase alcoholic beverages for consumption by an individual who is known to be under the age of 21 (Art. 27, Sec. 400).  It is also unlawful for any person under the age of 21 to knowingly and willfully make a misrepresentation or false statement as to his/her age in order to obtain alcoholic beverage or to induce the illegal sale or furnishing of alcoholic beverage@ (Art. 27, Sec. 403). 

  Only those students who are 21 years of age or older are permitted to have a reasonable amount of alcohol in their apartments.  Guests that are 21 years of age or older may not bring alcohol to a room/apartment/suite where at least one person is under the age of 21.

14. Emergency Response

  Loyola University will take all steps necessary to isolate and mitigate any emergency or dangerous situation that may affect the campus community.  All emergencies normally get reported to the Campus Police Communications Center which in turn dispatches Campus Police officers to the situation.  These officers along with Student Life members will make early assessments determining the size and scope of the emergency.  If the emergency is confirmed to be present and an immediate threat to the community, the Director or Assistant Directors of Public Safety will be notified and a mass notification notice will be sent to the community.  Some types of immediate threats generally are:

            a. Natural disasters that will directly and adversely affect the community.

            b. An active shooter or hostile armed intruder / robber in or around campus.

            c. Bomb threat or explosion.

            d. Civil disturbance that could have serious effect on the campus community.

            e. Terrorist attack.

            f. Chemical or biological accident or attack.

            g. Gas leak, water main break or a power loss that could have serious effect on the campus or          surrounding communities.

            h. Fire event.

15. Mass Notification (e2campus) and Timely Warning Policies

   The University uses e2campus as our mass notification system to disseminate immediate threats to the community. Students, staff, administrators and faculty can easily register or opt into this mass notification system by visiting the Public Safety web site at http://security.loyola.edu/e2campus/.  The mass notification system will send a text message to a cellular phone alerting the registered individual of the immediate threat.  The size of the message that can be sent to the cellular phone is limited so additional messages will continue to be passed through the phone as the situation develops.  Additionally information / incident alerts will also be passed through the Loyola intranet network and email systems. Complementing the electronic mass notification process will be critical information being transmitted over the air on our external public address system when appropriate. This system helps reach community members that may be out on the campus traveling from one place to the other.

            a. Timely Warning - The intent of a warning regarding a criminal incident is to enable the community to protect themselves.  The warning should be issued as soon as the pertinent information is available.  The timely warning will be released even if all the facts surrounding the incident are not known.  Timely warning must be issued for any Clery Act crimes (see section 20) that occurs on Clery geography that is:

                        1.  Reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies and

                        2.  Is considered by the institution to represent a serious or continuing threat to the                            students and employees.

Note:  Other crimes even if not Clery reportable can be sent out as a timely notice when the institution determines the warning would have merit.  These warnings should not be posted in locations that would make the community have to search for them or have to request them. 

            b. These notification systems will be activated without delay when the situation becomes known and there is a confirmation of an immediate threat to the campus. There could be situations when notification might compromise the efforts of those responding to the event which may dictate holding the message until an appropriate time later.

            c.. The responsibility to assess the criminal situation and disseminate the mass notification message lies with the Department of Public Safety.  The Campus Police organization has the means to develop the situation and initiate appropriate calls to the department leadership.  Once the Director, and or Assistant Directors of Public Safety have verified, as best they can, an immediate threat is continuing the activation of the mass notification process will begin. Critical information may come from many different sources BPD, County Police, State or City government agencies etc.  Each will be accessed and evaluated with respect to impact and threat to the University.  Normally critical information comes to the Campus Police Communications Center from field officers, over the telephone or by radio.  The Campus Police Communications Center is staffed 24 hours a day every day of the year.  After the initial immediate threat alerts have been disseminated additional information will be updated as the situation develops.  We anticipate a series of alert messages will be used as the situation evolves and as additional information becomes available.  A chronology of events and procedures will generally follow this sequence:

                        1. Event or incident.

                        2. First responders (Campus Police) dispatched.

                        3. Expansion of the situation and security needs (local perimeters if needed).

                        4. Calls for additional support BPD / BFD.

                        5. Assistant Directors or Director notified.

                        6. Analysis of the critical information if serious and continuing threat remains send the                                             warning(s).

                        7. Begin e2campus or PM Evergreen notification if there is a serious and continuing                                                 threat.

                        8. Use Public Address systems (if appropriate).

                        9. Establish command post (if appropriate).

                        10. React, coordinate, implement, and mitigate the effect.

                        11. Continue operations and disseminate additional messages as needed.

            d. The key positions at the University who interact throughout this process are:

                        1. Shift Commanders, Sergeants and the Officers in Charge.

                        2. Assistant Directors of Public Safety.

                        3. Director of Public Safety.

                        4. Vice President of Administration.

                        5. Executive Vice President

                        6. Vice President of Student Development.

                        7. Vice President of Finance.

                        8. Vice President of Enrollment Management and Communications.

                        9. Vice President of Advancement.

                        10. Any designated representative by the Vice Presidents

            e. The mass notification systems that we use; e2campus, public address, and incident alert, are messages that can be stratified by population and or location.  Undergraduate students, faculty, staff and administrators, and alumni can be reached by using the proper group addresses.  The dissemination of emergency information to the larger community is a collaborative effort between those mentioned above and the public relations leadership.  Discussions then take place about the impact of a message release and what information needs to be released.

            f. The University tests its mass notification systems every first Monday of the month.  This 1:00 pm test, exercises our e2campus, public address and email systems.  Each standalone system is tested and evaluated to see if they will be able to perform their intended functions when needed.  Our “Blue Light” distress stations in and around campus are tested each semester.  The Campus Police shifts are provided a designated number of duress stations to test; they record the results and submit work orders for those units that do not function properly. 

            g. The Department of Public Safety (DPS) conducts two exercises during the course of the year. One is at “In Service” training (May and June) and one over the Christmas holiday in December.  These exercises put our emergency responders, Campus Police, Student Life, Baltimore Police and other appropriate internal and external departments / divisions through procedures we expect to use during a crisis event. 

            h. The University normally conducts an exercise during the summer to evaluate and train the leadership of the Loyola community.

16.  Missing Student Notification

  Loyola University has an established missing student notification policy and procedures because we have on campus housing.  The University’s policy is to report any student that has been missing for 24 hours to local authorities.  The Department of Student Life is the proponent for reporting the status of a missing student to Campus Police who will in turn report the missing person with all appropriate information to Baltimore Police. 

            a. Key positions that have a responsibility to report missing students are:

                        1. Director of Student Life

                        2. Director of Public Safety

                        3. Vice President for Student Development

                       

            b. The general guidelines and procedures used for missing student notification are outlined in Student Life’s Community Standards and Student Life’s Standard Operating Procedures

.

                        1. Students that are University residents have the option to register a confidential contact person as the person they want notified in case a student is determined missing.

   

                        2. Campus officials and police officers may have access to this information while conducting a missing person investigation.

                        3. Students are advised about the option to register during first year orientation, RA floor meetings and are also informed that local law enforcement will be notified when a student is missing.

 

                        4. Students that are not 18 years or older do not have an option as to who will be notified.  The parent or guardian will be the notification point of contact.

                        5. Students that meet the 24 hour missing criteria must be reported to the University Campus Police or Baltimore City police.

17.  Student Life

  In keeping with the mission of the University, its educational goals and assumptions, the Office of Student Life strives to support the growth and development of Loyola students.  Student Life is committed to providing a safe, comfortable and educational environment.   Student Life oversees and reviews violations of the Community Standards, Policies and Procedures; the Student Code of Conduct and conducts and implements the University’s adjudication process.

  Student residence halls are secured at all times and may be entered only by a key and/or electronic access card.  There are also students employed as desk assistants who control residence hall access to Butler and Hammerman Halls, Hopkins Court, Newman Towers, and Campion Towers.

  Resident Assistants (RAs), who are selected and trained students, assist students in their development and adjustment to University life as well as monitor student deportment in the residential areas.

  RAs and Campus Police officers periodically make evening "rounds" together throughout the residence halls.  This relationship helps to ensure cooperation and increases the visibility of the Campus Police in and around the residence halls.

  The Department of Public Safety conducts several programs with the resident assistants during their initial and in-service training programs. These programs cover the topics of alcohol abuse prevention, fire safety, personal safety and security, and emergency procedures.

  There are also Graduate Resident Coordinators (GRC) who are live-in graduate students responsible for coordinating the activities and resources of the RAs, in residential areas.  The GRCs also provide assistance to the Assistant Directors of the Student Life staff in matters involving violations of the Student Code of Conduct.

  Campus Police are immediately notified by residence hall staff members if there is a crime or incident that requires the attention of the police.  The Office of Student Life and the Department of Public Safety work together regarding situations in the residence halls that might require emergency intervention.  All reports submitted by Campus Police are shared with the Office of Student Life.

  

18.  Sexual Misconduct Policy

Loyola University strives to create a safe educational and working environment for all the members of the University community including students, faculty, administrators and staff.  Violence or threats of violence of any kind, including domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking, will not be tolerated.  Loyola University fully supports and complies with all local, state, and federal criminal laws prohibiting sexual misconduct.  Information about Loyola University’s non-discrimination student policy, which includes sexual harassment, sexual violence, and reporting procedures, can be found on page 57 of the Community Standards. 

                a. For purposes of this policy, the following definitions apply:

                                1. Sexual Harassment: Sexual harassment is defined as unwelcome sexual advances, requests, and other verbal or physical conduct of a sexual nature when submission to or rejection of such conduct is a condition or basis for employment or educational decisions affecting the individual, or which is sufficiently severe, pervasive, and objectively offensive as to have the purpose or effect of unreasonably interfering with an individual’s performance or creating an intimidating, hostile, or offensive educational or work environment.

                        2. Sexual Verbal Abuse:  Sexual verbal abuse is using language that is sexual in nature and unwanted on the part of another person. Examples include but are not limited to phone calls or use of written and/or verbal communication that are intimidating, threatening, or obscene in nature.

                        3. Sexual Assault:  Sexual assault includes any sexual act or sexual contact without consent, including intercourse, oral sex, unwanted touching of an intimate body part of another person, such as sexual organs, buttocks, or breasts, or an attempt of any of the above. Rape is a type of sexual assault. This description of prohibited sexual acts and conduct is not intended to be inclusive of all conduct that could fall within this category. It is the intent of this policy to provide notice that any unconsented sexual conduct, whether by a stranger or an acquaintance of the victim, is prohibited.

 

                                4. Consent:  Consent is defined as an affirmative indication of a voluntary agreement to engage in the particular sexual act or conduct in question. Consent cannot be obtained through the use of force, threat, or intimidation. Consent cannot be given by someone who is not able to effectively communicate or to understand the nature of the conduct being engaged in as a result of having consumed drugs or alcohol or for any other reason. Silence on the part of an individual does not constitute his or her consent.

                     

                      5. Domestic Violence:  Domestic violence includes felony or misdemeanor crimes of violence committed by a current or former spouse of the victim by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of Maryland, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from that person’s acts under the domestic violence laws of Maryland.

                      6. Dating Violence:  Dating violence means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim and where the existence of such a relationship is determined based on the length of the relationship, the type of relationship, and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship.

                                7. Stalking:  Stalking means engaging in a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for his or her safety or the safety of others, or suffer substantial emotional distress.

Violations of the sexual misconduct policy are serious and although there are no standard sanctions outlined for violations of this policy, suspension and/or expulsion from the University is possible.

                b. Response to Sexual Misconduct

  As members of the University community, students are expected to respect the rights, dignity, and personhood of others. The University encourages students to understand the limitations governing sexual contact (including intercourse) between persons. The Counseling Center provides qualified professionals who can help students clarify their feelings about sexuality and intimacy and help students develop assertiveness skills that may be useful in managing potentially difficult situations. The Counseling Center staff provides direct service and referrals for survivors of sexual misconduct.

 

  Educational programs to promote the awareness of rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking are offered at new student orientation, in new employee orientation, in the residence halls, and on campus throughout the academic year. Such prevention and awareness programs include a statement that the University prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct, definitions of various types of sexual misconduct and of consent, safe and positive options for bystander intervention, and information on risk reduction to recognize warning signs of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks.

 

  If you believe that you have been the victim of sexual misconduct on University property, at a University-sponsored event, or by a member of the University community, you are encouraged to report the incident to Loyola.  Reports of sexual misconduct can be made to any University administrator or member of the faculty or to Campus Police.  (The Director of Student Life and the University’s Title IX Coordinator will be notified of all reports.) You will be asked to provide a statement to the investigating Campus Police officer and an Assistant or Associate Director of student life. It is important to give as much information as possible as your statement will serve as the basis for further investigation of any case and any resulting campus charges. You will be provided with a written explanation of your rights and options as described in this policy. 

  Students are encouraged to seek medical assistance in cases of sexual misconduct.  Upon request, Campus Police will provide transportation to Mercy Hospital, designated as one of the city’s rape treatment centers. This hospital is equipped to perform the Sexual Assault Forensics Exam (SAFE) and provide victim services.  It is important to preserve evidence for proof of a criminal offense if charges may be filed.

  The University encourages any student who has been a victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking to consult their parents/guardians and to report the incident to the Baltimore City Police. The Director of Public Safety or his/her designee can assist the victim in contacting the appropriate law enforcement officials and in working with these officials to pursue criminal charges against the alleged offender. Victims also have the option to decline to notify law enforcement authorities. Protective orders and peace orders may be sought through the court system.

  If you have been the victim of sexual misconduct but do not want to report it for investigation, you may seek out a counselor or psychologist in the Counseling Center.  Reports made to a licensed counselor or health care provider are confidential and will not be reported for investigation without your permission unless an imminent threat exists.  If you would like to seek counseling assistance off campus, you may contact TurnAround at 410-837-7000 or the Sexual Assault/Domestic Violence 24-hour hotline at 410-828-6390.

  A student who has been the victim of domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, or stalking may request to transfer to alternative classes or housing. The University will accommodate this request if such classes and/or housing are reasonably available.  The Dean of First Year Students and Academic Services can provide additional academic support to students if requested.

                c. Charges of Sexual Misconduct

  The University’s procedures provide for prompt, fair, and impartial investigation and resolution of all reports of sexual misconduct. Investigations and hearings will be conducted by officials who have received annual training on the issues related to domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking and on how to conduct an investigation and hearing process that protects the safety of victims and promotes accountability.

  Due to the usually private nature of these actions, the University may not be able to pursue charges of sexual misconduct unless the complainant acts as the accuser and primary witness. However, in cases where there may be a witness to the alleged violation, or in cases where the complainant requests that the University pursue the case even though she/he is unwilling to act as the accuser, or in cases in which pursuing the case is in the best interest of the University, the University reserves the right to pursue a case to its conclusion.

  Upon becoming aware of an allegation of sexual misconduct against a student, the Office of Student Life and the Department of Public Safety, in consultation with the Title IX Coordinator, will initiate an investigation and take actions deemed necessary to protect the emotional well-being of the individuals involved, as well as the educational environment of the University community. These actions may include, but are not limited to, relocating residence hall assignments, restricting access to certain campus buildings, prohibiting contact between the alleged offender, the complainant, or witnesses, or suspending the alleged offender from campus pending the hearing.  In cases where law enforcement is involved, the University will comply with all investigative efforts and will resume its own investigation of the case when permitted.

  All hearings involving sexual misconduct will be conducted in accordance with the normal rules and procedures of the student conduct process with special sensitivity to the nature of the charges and the best interests of all parties involved. All participants are expected to maintain confidentiality regarding the proceedings, except that the complainant and the alleged offender may not be required to maintain confidentiality as to the outcome of the proceedings.  In recognition of the unique nature of sexual misconduct cases, the procedures specified in this section supersede any conflicting provisions of the University student conduct process. Actions by the police or criminal courts do not in any way preclude a student from pursuing charges through the University’s student conduct system. Similarly, pursuit of charges through the University’s student conduct system does not preclude the pursuit of criminal charges.

            1. The sexual misconduct hearing panel will be comprised of one faculty member, one graduate student, and the Director of Student Life or his/her designee. All panel members will receive special training on sexual misconduct cases.

            2. If, in the judgment of the Director of Student Life or his/her designee, the timing of the charges precludes the participation of a student and/or faculty member, the Director of Student Life and a student development administrator or faculty member will serve as hearing officers for the case.

            3. The alleged offender and complainant may each have an advisor present during the hearing, but the advisor is not allowed to address the panel or question witnesses. The advisor must be a full-time member of the Loyola University Maryland community (faculty, administrator, staff, or student) and cannot be an attorney or hold a law degree.

            4. Under Title IX, both the alleged offender and complainant have a right to similar and timely access to information that will be used at the hearing.  Although hearing materials become part of a charged student’s educational record under FERPA, the University reserves the right to share relevant case materials with both parties.

            5. The alleged offender and the complainant each has the right to bring witnesses to the hearing to testify on his/her behalf. There is no limitation placed on the number of fact witnesses; however, students are limited to two character witnesses to testify on their behalf. In the event that a witness cannot attend a hearing, the witness may email or personally deliver a signed written statement directly to the hearing officer in advance of the scheduled hearing.

            6. The hearing will begin with the panel chair going over the student rights and responsibilities for the alleged offender, and then reading his/her charges.  The alleged offender will have the opportunity to present an opening statement to the panel that describes his/her involvement and/or responsibility in the incident.  The complainant will then have an opportunity to present his/her statement to the panel. The complainant may choose to present her/his testimony without the alleged offender being present. Several options exist where the complainant does not want to be present in the room with the alleged offender. The testimony presented to the panel can be recorded and replayed for the alleged offender to hear before he/she gives any testimony or presents any evidence. The alleged offender can also listen to the testimony by intercom. The complainant has the right to be present for, or listen to, all testimony given during the hearing, if he/she so chooses. The panel will then call witnesses and has the ability to recall the alleged offender and any witness, including the complainant, for clarification. The complainant has the right to provide a written impact statement that describes how the incident has affected him/her.  The impact statement is reviewed by the hearing panel only if a determination of responsibility is made and before a sanction is determined. If an impact statement was submitted and reviewed by the hearing panel, a copy will be provided to the alleged offender with the decision letter.

                7. Statements or questions regarding the past sexual history of the alleged offender or complainant generally will not be permissible as evidence during the hearing except as they relate to the past sexual history of the alleged offender with the complainant.

            8. The degree of impairment of the complainant’s ability to give or withhold consent may be introduced into evidence.

            9. The panel will use a preponderance of evidence standard to evaluate complaints of sexual misconduct.  If the panel determines that the offender is responsible for a violation of this policy, the panel will decide the appropriate sanctions in accordance with the Student Code of Conduct.  Drug or alcohol use by the offender is not a defense to a charge of sexual misconduct and will not be considered a mitigating factor in assessing an appropriate sanction.

            10. The alleged offender and the complainant will be informed simultaneously in writing of the outcome of the hearing, normally within five working days.  Both parties will receive written notice of any sanctions imposed on the alleged offender, except that in cases of non-violent sexual harassment the complainant will only receive notice of any sanctions that relate directly to the complainant.

            11. If the alleged offender is found responsible for a sexual misconduct violation, he/she may appeal the decision and/or the sanction to the University Board on Discipline.  If the complainant disagrees with the findings or sanctions given to the alleged offender, he/she also may appeal to the University Board on Discipline. Information about the grounds for appeal can be found on page 25. The panel members who were involved in the original hearing will not serve on the University Board on Discipline for the appeal hearing.

            12. When an appeal letter is submitted, the other party will be given notice of the grounds of the appeal and will be provided the opportunity to submit a response.

In cases where appeals are submitted by both parties, both appeals will be reviewed by the same board.  Each student will have the ability to present his/her grounds for appeal and any new evidence, as well as respond to questions from the board and hear the rationale from the hearing officer who chaired the panel that made the original decision.  The burden is on each student to present grounds for his/her appeal to the board that will then make the final decision regarding the findings and sanction(s) associated with the case. This decision will be communicated in writing to both the alleged offender and the complainant within five working days of the appeal hearing. If only one party appeals, the other party has the right to attend the hearing and participate even if he/she chooses not to appeal.

            13. At any time during the student conduct process if the complainant or alleged offender desires to seek the services of the Counseling Center or Campus Ministry staff, he/she may contact these offices directly or through the Director of Student Life.

            14. Any retaliation, reprisal, or intimidation directed toward a complainant or anyone else as a result of reporting or participating in an investigation or adjudication of alleged sexual misconduct is strictly prohibited. Any incidents of retaliation should be reported immediately to Student Life and are considered a serious violation of this policy.

19.  Sexual Offender Registration

The Campus Sex Crimes Prevention Act (CSCPA) of 2000 is a federal law that provides for the tracking of convicted sex offenders enrolled at, or employed by, institutions of higher education.  The CSCPA is an amendment to the Jacob Watterling Crimes Against Children and Sexually Violent Offender Act.  The federal law requires state law enforcement agencies to make this list available.  Maryland’s registry can be reviewed at http://www.dpscs.state.md.us/onlineservs/socem/default.shtml  The CSCPA further amends the Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974 (FERPA) to clarify that nothing in the Act can prohibit an educational institution from disclosing information provided to the institution concerning registered sex offenders.

20.  Violence Against Woman Reauthorizations Act of 2013 (VAWA): The President signed the VAWA (Public Law 113-4) on March 7, 2013.  Among other provisions, this law amended Section 485(f) of the Higher Education Act of 1965. The statutory changes require institutions to compile statistics for instances of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence and stalking that are reported to campus security authorities or local police agencies.  Additionally, institutions will be required to include certain policies, procedures and programs pertaining to these crimes in their Annual Security Reports. Violations of the sexual misconduct policy are serious and although there are no standard sanctions outlined for violations of this policy, suspension and/or expulsion from the University for students and probation, suspension and up to and including termination for FAS members are likely outcomes.  Professional standards and business conduct policies for all faculty, staff and administrators are provided in Chapter 8, Code of Conduct, of the Staff and Administrators Policy Manual.  The university’s sexual misconduct policy is provided in section 18 above.

 

21 Crime Statistics

  The following definitions are to be used for reporting the crimes listed in 34 CFR sec. 668.46 (previously 668.47) in accordance with the Federal Bureau of Investigation's Uniform Crime Reporting Program. The definitions for murder, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, weapon law violations, drug abuse violations and liquor law violations are excerpted from the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook. The definitions of forcible and non forcible sex offenses are excerpted from the National Incident Reporting System Edition of the Uniform Crime Reporting Handbook.

Arson - Any willful or malicious burning or attempt to burn, with or without intent to defraud, a dwelling house, public building, motor vehicle or aircraft, personal property of another, etc.

Criminal Homicide - Manslaughter by Negligence is the killing of another person through gross negligence.

Criminal Homicide-Murder and Non-negligent Manslaughter - The willful (non-negligent) killing of one human being by another.

Robbery - The taking or attempting to take anything of value from the care, custody, or control of a person or persons by force or threat of force or violence and/or by putting the victim in fear.

Aggravated Assault - An unlawful attack by one person upon another for the purpose of inflicting severe or aggravated bodily injury. This type of assault usually is accompanied by the use of a weapon or by means likely to produce death or great bodily harm.  It is not necessary that injury result from an aggravated assault when a gun, knife, or other weapon is used which could and probably would result in serious personal injury if the crime were successfully completed.  This category also includes “assault with disease” when a perpetrator knowingly infects another with a deadly disease.

Burglary - The unlawful entry of a structure to commit a felony or a theft. For reporting purposes this definition includes: unlawful entry with intent to commit a theft or felony; breaking and entering with intent to commit a theft housebreaking; safecracking; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

Motor Vehicle Theft - The theft or attempted theft of a motor vehicle. (Classify as motor vehicle theft all cases where automobiles are taken by persons not having lawful access even though the vehicles are later abandoned, including joyriding.)

Weapon Law Violations -The violation of laws or ordinances dealing with weapon offenses, regulatory in nature, such as: manufacture, sale, or possession of deadly weapons; carrying deadly weapons, concealed or openly; furnishing deadly weapons to minors; aliens possessing deadly weapons; and all attempts to commit any of the aforementioned.

 Liquor Law Violations - The violation of laws or ordinances prohibiting: the manufacture, sale, transporting, furnishing, possessing of intoxicating liquor; maintaining unlawful drinking places; bootlegging; operating a still; furnishing liquor to a minor or intemperate person; using a vehicle for illegal transportation of liquor; drinking on a train or public conveyance; and all attempts to commit any of  the aforementioned. (Drunkenness and driving under the influence are not included in this definition.)

Drug Law Violations -Violations of State and local laws relating to the unlawful possession, sale, use, growing, manufacturing and making of narcotic drugs. The relevant substances include: opium or cocaine and their derivatives (morphine, heroin, codeine); marijuana; synthetic narcotics (Demerol, methadone’s); and dangerous non-narcotic drugs (barbiturates, Benzedrine).

Sex Offenses - Definitions are from the National Incident Reporting System Edition of the Uniform Crime Reporting Program.

Sex Offenses-Forcible - Any sexual act directed against another person, forcibly and/or against that person’s will; or not forcibly or against the person’s will where the victim is incapable of giving consent.

            A. Forcible Rape

            B. Forcible Sodomy

            C. Sexual Assault with an Object

            D. Forcible Fondling

Sex Offenses-Non forcible - Unlawful, non-forcible sexual intercourse.

            A. Incest-Non forcible sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.

            B. Statutory Rape-Non forcible sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent. Source: Federal Register, April 29, 1994, Vol. 59, No. 82; Federal Register, November 1, 1999, Vol. 64, No. 210.

22.  Crime Reporting Areas

For the purpose of reporting statistics, institutions of higher education need to distinguish, by means of separate categories, criminal offenses that occur on campus; in or on a non-campus building or property; on public property; and in dormitories or other residential facilities for students on campus. These newly established geographic areas are defined as:

            a. Campus - Residence and Non-residence

                        (1) Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area and used by the institution in direct support of, or in a manner related to, the institution's educational purposes, including residence halls; and

                        (2) Any building or property that is within or reasonably contiguous to the area identified in paragraph (1) of this definition, that is owned by the institution but controlled by another person, is frequently used by students and supports institutional purposes (such as a food or other retail vendor).

            b. Non-campus Building or Property -

                        (1) Any building or property owned or controlled by a student organization that is officially recognized by the institution (no such buildings exist at Loyola University); or

                        (2) Any building or property owned or controlled by an institution that is used in direct support of, or in relation to, the institution’s educational purposes, is frequently used by students and is not within the same reasonably contiguous geographic area of the institution.

            c. Public Property-

All public property, including thoroughfares, streets, sidewalks and parking facilities, that are on campus, or immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus.

23. Hate and Bias Crime Reporting 

  We report hate crimes that fall into one of these criminal categories; homicide, sex offences, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, and any other crime involving bodily injury reported to local law enforcement agencies or a campus security authority.  Evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the perpetrator’s actual or perceived bias towards a disability, ethnicity, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation will be assessed.  Revised regulations added the crimes of larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/ damage/ vandalism of property to the list of crimes that must be reported in the hate crime statistics.  The FBI’s Uniform Crime Reporting Hate Crime Collection Guidelines will continue to be the source for definitions.  Student Bias reporting can be made through the following web site:  http://www.loyola.edu/department/reportbias/report.aspx   Faculty, staff and administrators can find information about reporting this in Chapter 8, section 8.19, Reporting Ethics and Policy Violations in the Staff and Administrators Policy Manual.  

24.  Family Education Rights to Privacy Act (FERPA) of 1974

 

  The University abides by the Family Education Rights to Privacy Act of 1974 which contains guidelines for the handling and confidentiality of student records. FERPA gives students certain basic rights.  To review the University’s policy concerning FERPA, consult the Undergraduate Catalog. One exception, which permits disclosure without consent, is disclosure to school officials with legitimate educational interests. A school official is a person employed by the University in an administrative, supervisory, academic or research, or support staff position (including law enforcement unit personnel and health staff); a person or company with whom the University has contracted (such as an attorney, auditor, or collection agent); a person serving on the Board of Trustees; or a student serving on an official committee, such as a disciplinary or grievance committee, or assisting another school official in performing his or her tasks. 

  A school official has a legitimate educational interest if the official needs to review an education record in order to fulfill his or her professional responsibility. Upon request, the University discloses educational records without consent to officials of another school in which a student seeks or intends to enroll.

Conditions that apply to disclosure of information in health and safety emergencies:

            (a) An educational agency or institution may disclose personally identifiable information from an education record to appropriate parties, including parents of an eligible student, in connection with an emergency if knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals.

            (b) Nothing in this Act or this part shall prevent an educational agency or institution from-

                        (1) Including in the education records of a student appropriate information concerning disciplinary action taken against the student for conduct that posed a significant risk to the safety or well-being of that student, other students, or other members of the school community;

                        (2) Disclosing appropriate information maintained under paragraph (b)(1) of this section to teachers and school officials within the agency or institution who the agency or institution has determined have legitimate educational interests in the behavior of the student; or

                        (3) Disclosing appropriate information maintained under paragraph (b)(1) of this section to teachers and school officials in other schools who have been determined to have legitimate educational interests in the behavior of the student.

            (c) In making a determination under paragraph (a) of this section, an educational agency or institution may take into account the totality of the circumstances pertaining to a threat to the health or safety of a student or other individuals. If the educational agency or institution determines that there is an articulable and significant threat to the health or safety of a student or other individuals, it may disclose information from education records to any person whose knowledge of the information is necessary to protect the health or safety of the student or other individuals. If, based on the information available at the time of the determination, there is a rational basis for the determination the Department will not substitute its judgment for that of the educational agency or institution in evaluating the circumstances and making its determination.

(Authority: 20 U.S.C. 1232g (b)(1)(I) and (h))

25. Annual Fire Safety Report

            a. General Procedures: General fire evacuation procedures include the following directions for occupants of any University building. If the fire alarm system is activated Campus Police will respond to all fire alarms and emergency situations. They will notify the Baltimore Fire Department (BFD) if any fire alarm is activated.  Occupants of all floors will immediately evacuate the building at the sound of the fire alarm system. In the event a fire occurs the Loyola community is advised to do the following:

                   1. Remain calm and go to the nearest stairwell, walk on the right side. Walk, do not run.  Do not use elevators, they will not be in service during a fire alarm condition.  Exit out of the building.  Go to the rally point tell leaders you are out of the building, follow instructions from there.    

                        2. Pull the nearest red manual pull station usually on the wall near stairwells and exits.  This will activate the building’s fire alarm system.

                        3. Report the fire (regardless of size) to Public Safety at x5911.  Give the following infomation:

                                    a. Your name

                           b. Location of fire (building name, apt, room # or area)

                           c. Injured people

                        4. Assist in the evacuation of the building.  Give any disabled occupant information to Campus Police or the BFD upon exiting.

                                    a. Close all doors when leaving rooms.  If your room/apartment door is hot to the touch and smoke is beginning to filter into your room place a wet towel under the door or seal it with tape.  Wave a sheet or large garment out the window. Wait for assistance from the BFD.

                             b. Keep low and crawl in any smoke filled areas.

                                    c. Do not re-enter the building until the all clear has been announced.  This occurs after the BFD gives their all clear and Campus Police has completed a survey.

            b. Residence Halls:  Campus Police and the Student Life staff will assist in the complete evacuation of the building and control the occupants in the assembly area until the emergency has been abated (see specific building evacuation procedures.)

            c. Academic Buildings:  Campus Police and any designated fire wardens present in the building will assist in the complete evacuation of the building and control the occupants in the assembly area until the emergency has been abated (see specific building evacuation procedures.)

            d. Fire Drills: During any given calendar year there are several fire drills conducted and documented.   Formal fire drills are conducted each semester in the residence halls.   After action reviews are also documented in order to train, educate, and improve upon evacuation times with Public Safety and Student Life staff.

            e. Policies on portable electrical appliances, smoking and open flames:  Smoking, candles, and open flames are prohibited in Loyola University Maryland residence halls.  No portable electrical appliances, hot plates, fireworks, firearms, electric heaters, or halogen lamps are allowed in Loyola housing.

            f. Student Housing Evacuation:  A policy involving the mandatory evacuation of each residence hall upon fire alarm activation is in effect.  A community citation is issued to all residents that fail to evacuate, whereby the judicial process may levy fines ($250) and sanctions (community service) for each violation.

            g. Fire Safety Education:  Various training and educational seminars are conducted during the summer orientation sessions with students.  Resident Assistants, graduate assistants and assistant directors in Student Life are the first group of students to undergo annual fire safety training.  Locations of rally points, evacuation procedures, and apartment style kitchen fire safety tips are all delivered by the Environmental Health and Safety Department (EHS).  During numerous sessions such as new employee orientation training, departmental training sessions and fire prevention week, EHS delivers fire safety and fire prevention tips to the entire campus community.  Students are trained on how to extinguish a small kitchen grease fire with a variety of extinguishers after a classroom session on fire extinguisher use.  Rally point maps and other pertinent emergency evacuation training is conducted for all new employees, Student Life staff and posted on Loyola’s intranet.  Public Safety officers receive over ten hours of in depth new hire fire safety training, including at least two hours of hands-on fire alarm system field training.  EHS consists of a staff of four individuals that have direct responsibility for fire alarm systems, maintenance, inspections, testing and the overall fire safety program.

            h. Contact points for reporting fires:  There are several methods in which a student, faculty, staff or other person within Loyola’s community can report a fire.  If you wish to report that a fire has occurred please contact one of the following individuals or departments; Public Safety or Environmental Health and Safety.

                   a. Director of Public Safety x2863

                   b. Director of Environmental Health and Safety x1120

                   c. Chief Fire Safety Officer x2972

                   d. Fire Alarm Technician x1121

                      e. Environmental Compliance Coordinator x1142

            i. During an emergency:  Please call x5911in order to report the fire; this is the main Public Safety emergency number.  A variety of other methods can be used to report a fire, whether it is outside a residence hall (i.e. mulch fires) or within the confines of a building.

                        a. Blue light emergency phones - call button goes directly to the Public Safety operator.

                        b. Elevator phones - call button goes directly to the Public Safety operator.

                        c. Any Loyola phone – call 911 to directly report a fire to the BFD, give proper street address when talking to a fire dispatcher; Public Safety will also respond when a 911 call is made.

                        d. Call x5010 which is the non-emergency number for Public Safety, calls are taken in the order that they are received. 

            j. Future improvement plans:  Future improvements for fire safety include the following measures:

                        a. Update and enhance our fire safety training programs camps wide.

                        b. Consistent educational reinforcement for students causing nuisance alarms.

                        c. Fully sprinklered residence halls across campus (35% of all residence halls are currently sprinklered..

                        d. Upgrading of older (10-15 year life cycle) fire alarm systems in order to maintain current technologies.

            k. Fire Statistics (Residence Halls):

                        a. The residence halls statistics for the period of January through December are found on the last three pages of this booklet. 

                        b. No arsons have been reported for the past three years. 

            l. Description of Residence Hall Fire Alarm Systems:  All residence halls are equipped with standalone fire alarm systems that are then connected through a dedicated wide area fiber optic network.  The network is supported by a proprietary central monitoring station which is backed-up with emergency power at the Public Safety Dispatch console.  These fire alarm systems are also backed up with battery power at each building, and contain all monitoring of sprinkler, suppression, detection and relay devices.  There are smoke detectors in nearly every bedroom (minimum of one smoke detector per apartment) and 24/7 monitoring that meets, or in most cases exceeds, the National Fire Alarm Code requirements.

            m.  Fire Log:  The fire log is an easily understood report that identifies actual fires that have occurred on our campuses.  The log is maintained by the EHS office and can be found at the following link:  http://www.loyola.edu/department/ehs/fire-safety/Loyola%20University%20Maryland%20Annual%20Fire%20Log.aspx

The fire log includes data on the entire calendar year and gets updated as actual fires occur.  The fire log is available in paper form upon request.

For Further Information

Write or call:

Loyola University Maryland

4501 N. Charles Street

Baltimore, Maryland 21210

Alcohol/Drug Education                                             Department of Environmental

and Support Services                                                  Health and Safety,     

Jan Williams, Director                                                           Thomas Hettleman, Director

410-617-2928                                                              410-617-1120

Department of Public Safety                                      Office of Student Life

Timothy F. Fox, Director                                           Christina Spearman, Director

410-617-2863                                                              410-617-2488




LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

MAIN CAMPUS (1)

Type of offense

Year

Campus Property

Residential Facilities (2)

Non Campus Property(3)

Public Property(4)

Total

Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Manslaughter by Negligence

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Sex Offense Forcible: Rape, Fondling, Sodomy, Sexual Assault

2012

2

2

0

2

2011

1

1

0

1

2010

2

2

0

2

Sex Offense Non-Forcible: Incest and Statutory Rape

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Robbery

2012

1

0

1

2

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

2

0

0

2

Aggravated Assault

2012

1

0

0

1

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

3

0

0

3

Burglary

2012

1

1

0

1

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

2

3

0

3

Motor Vehicle

Theft (6)

2012

1

0

0

1

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

1

0

1

2

Arson

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Hate Crimes (5)

2012

1

1

0

1

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Stalking  (7)

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Domestic

Violence (7)

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Dating

Violence (7)

2012

1

0

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

MAIN CAMPUS (1) cont.

Type of offense

Year

Campus property

Residential Facilities (2)

Non Campus

Property(3)

Public Property(4)

Total

Liquor Law Violations (referred for disciplinary action)

2012

258

247

29

287

2011

337

321

8

345

2010

614

566

23

637

Drug Law Violations (referred for disciplinary action)

2012

23

19

3

26

2011

24

23

6

30

2010

36

36

2

38

Liquor Law Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

1

1

2010

0

0

0

0

Drug Law Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Weapons Possession Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Footnotes for the Loyola University Maryland

 

(1). The statistics reflect a 2012 University population of approximately 3917 undergraduate students, 2061 graduate students, and 1364 employees.

(2). The residential facilities statistics are duplicative. They are included in the campus statistics and reflect that portion of the campus statistics which occurred in residence halls or other residential facilities for students on campus.

(3). Presently Loyola University does not have any property in this category.

(4). The statistics listed in “public property” include incidents which took place off campus, on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus, but not on the property of Loyola University.

(5). Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or perceived bias towards another’s disability, ethnicity, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation.  Hate crimes are reported for the crimes of criminal homicide, sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, and any other crime involving bodily injury, as well as, larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism.

      One (1) written intimidation on campus in a residence hall involving bias against race.

                 

(6). The Clery Act definition of motor vehicle thefts includes golf carts, motor-scooters, and other “non-traditional” vehicles.

(7). Statutory changes require institutions to compile statistics for instances of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking in the 2013 reporting year.  Department of Education has asked institutions to make good faith efforts to provide these statistics in the 2012 annual security and fire report.


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

COLUMBIA CAMPUS (1)

Type of offense

Year

Campus property

Residential Facilities (2)

Non Campus Property(3)

Public Property (4)

Total

Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Manslaughter by Negligence

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Sex Offense Forcible: Rape, Fondling, Sodomy, Sexual Assault

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Sex Offense Non-Forcible: Incest and Statutory Rape

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Robbery

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Aggravated Assault

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Burglary

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Motor Vehicle

Theft (6)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Arson

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Hate Crimes (5)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Stalking (7)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Domestic

Violence (7)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Dating

Violence (7)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

COLUMBIA CAMPUS (1) cont.

Type of offense

Year

Campus property

Residential Facilities (2)

Non Campus

Property (3)

Public Property (4)

Total

Liquor Law Violations (referred for disciplinary action)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Drug Law Violations (referred for disciplinary action)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Liquor Law Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Drug Law Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Weapons Possession Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

 

 

 

 

Footnotes for the Loyola University Maryland

 

(1). The statistics reflect a 2012 University population of approximately 3917 undergraduate students, 2061 graduate students, and 1364 employees.

(2). The residential facilities statistics are duplicative. They are included in the campus statistics and reflect that portion of the campus statistics which occurred in residence halls or other residential facilities for students on campus.

(3). Presently Loyola University does not have any property in this category.

(4). The statistics listed in “public property” include incidents which took place off campus, on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus, but not on the property of Loyola University Maryland.

(5). Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or perceived bias towards another’s disability, ethnicity, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation.  Hate crimes are reported for the crimes of criminal homicide, sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, and any other crime involving bodily injury, as well as, larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism.

(6). The Clery Act definition of motor vehicle thefts includes golf carts, motor-scooters, and other “non-traditional” vehicles.

(7). Statutory changes require institutions to compile statistics for instances of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking in the 2013 reporting year.  Department of Education has asked institutions to make good faith efforts to provide these statistics in the 2012 annual security and fire report.


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

TIMONIUM CAMPUS (1)

Type of offense

Year

Campus property

Residential Facilities (2)

Non Campus Property (3)

Public Property (4)

Total

Murder and Non-Negligent Manslaughter

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Manslaughter by Negligence

2012

0

n/a

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Sex Offense Forcible: Rape, Fondling, Sodomy, Sexual Assault

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Sex Offense Non-Forcible: Incest and Statutory Rape

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Robbery

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Aggravated Assault

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Burglary

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Motor Vehicle

Theft (6)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Arson

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Hate Crimes (5)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Stalking (7)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Domestic

Violence (7)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

Dating

Violence (7)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a

2010

n/a

n/a

n/a

n/a


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

TIMONIUM CAMPUS (1) cont.

Type of offense

Year

Campus property

Residential Facilities (2)

Non Campus

Property (3)

Public Property (4)

Total

Liquor Law Violations (referred for disciplinary action)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Drug Law Violations (referred for disciplinary action)

2012

0

n/a

0

0

2011

0

n/a

0

0

2010

0

n/a

0

0

Liquor Law Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Drug Law Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

Weapons Possession Arrests

2012

0

0

0

0

2011

0

0

0

0

2010

0

0

0

0

 

 

Footnotes for the Loyola University Maryland

 

(1). The statistics reflect a 2012 University population of approximately 3917 undergraduate students, 2061 graduate students, and 1364 employees.

(2). The residential facilities statistics are duplicative. They are included in the campus statistics and reflect that portion of the campus statistics which occurred in residence halls or other residential facilities for students on campus.

(3). Presently Loyola University does not have any property in this category.

(4). The statistics listed in “public property” include incidents which took place off campus, on public property immediately adjacent to and accessible from the campus, but not on the property of Loyola University Maryland.

(5).  Hate crimes are crimes that manifest evidence that the victim was intentionally selected because of the victim's actual or perceived bias towards another’s disability, ethnicity, gender identity, national origin, race, religion, or sexual orientation.  Hate crimes are reported for the crimes of criminal homicide, sex offenses, robbery, aggravated assault, burglary, motor vehicle theft, arson, and any other crime involving bodily injury, as well as, larceny-theft, simple assault, intimidation, and destruction/damage/vandalism.

(6). The Clery Act definition of motor vehicle thefts includes golf carts, motor-scooters, and other “non-traditional” vehicles.

(7). Statutory changes require institutions to compile statistics for instances of domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking in the 2013 reporting year.  Department of Education has asked institutions to make good faith efforts to provide these statistics in the 2012 annual security and fire report.

Loyola University Maryland

Residence Halls Fire Statistics 2012

Residence Hall

# of Fires

# of Deaths

# of Injuries

Value of

Property Damage

Date

Explanation

Corrective Action(s)

Ahern Hall

0

0

0

0

Aquinas Hall

0

0

0

0

Avila Hall

0

0

0

0

Bellarmine Hall

0

0

0

0

Bokel Court

0

0

0

0

Butler Hall

0

0

0

0

Campion Towers

1

0

0

$500

9/4/12

Student placed shoes in the oven/broiler as a prank. Shoes were forgotten about and oven was turned on to bake cookies.

Stove/oven unit was replaced; student was required to attend fire safety education.

Claver Hall

0

0

0

0

Crowson Avenue

0

0

0

0

Dorothy Day Hall

0

0

0

0

Flannery O’Connor Hall

0

0

0

0

Gallagher Court

1

0

0

$12

8/26/12

A student owned lamped was plugged into a wall outlet.  The power cord overheated.

Educated the student on ensuring that any electrical items (lamps) brought to school be UL listed, and to not overload the outlets.

Hammerman House

0

0

0

0

Hopkins Court

0

0

0

0

Lange Court

2

0

0

$68

2/7/12

11/9/12

Items being prepared in a toaster oven were overheated and caught fire.

A metal mixing bowl with a rubberized bottom was placed on the electric burner of a stove unit in a common kitchen.

Students were educated on the importance of watching food when it is cooking and following package directions.

Students educated to be aware of all cooking surfaces and that they may be hot, and to only use  appropriate cooking devices.

McAuley Hall

0

0

0

0

Newman Towers

0

0

0

0

Seton Court

0

0

0

0

Southwell Hall

0

0

0

0

Tantallion Court

0

0

0

0


Loyola University Maryland

Annual Residence Halls Fire Statistics - 2011

Residence Hall

# of Fires

# of Deaths

# of Injuries

Value of

Property Damage

Date

Explanation

Corrective Action(s)

Ahern Hall

2

0

0

$20

$50

4/29/11

11/12/11

Mulch Fire

Overcooked food in a microwave

Education, increased watering of garden and landscaped areas

Fire safety education was performed with students

Aquinas Hall

0

0

0

0

Avila Hall

0

0

0

0

Bellarmine Hall

0

0

0

0

Bokel Court

0

0

0

0

Butler Hall

0

0

0

0

Campion Towers

1

0

0

1,165

5/13/11

Overloaded dryer caused build-up of heat starting a fire

Dryer unit replaced heavier duty model.  Reminders posted

Claver Hall

1

0

0

$1,325

4/9/11

A laptop with a recalled battery for risk of fire overheated while placed on a bed.

Education with students about recalls on electronic devices

Crowson Avenue

0

0

0

0

Dorothy Day Hall

0

0

0

0

Flannery O’Connor Hall

0

0

0

0

Gallagher Court

0

0

0

0

Hammerman House

0

0

0

0

Hopkins Court

0

0

0

0

Lange Court

0

0

0

0

McAuley Hall

0

0

0

0

Newman Towers

1

0

0

$20

10/8/11

Mulch Fire

Education, increased watering of garden and landscaped areas

Seton Court

0

0

0

0

Southwell Hall

0

0

0

0

Tantallion Court

0

0

0

0


LOYOLA UNIVERSITY MARYLAND

Annual Residence Halls Fire Statistics - 2010

Residence Hall

# of Fires

# of Deaths

# of Injuries

Value of

Property Damage

Date

Explanation

Corrective Action(s)

Ahern Hall

1

0

0

$20

4/11/10

Mulch Fire

Education, increased watering of garden and landscaped areas

Aquinas Hall

0

0

0

0

Avila Hall

0

0

0

0

Bellarmine Hall

0

0

0

0

Bokel Court

0

0

0

0

Butler Hall

0

0

0

0

Campion Towers

1

0

0

$20

9/7/10

Mulch Fire

Education, increased watering of garden and landscaped areas

Claver Hall

0

0

0

0

Crowson Avenue

0

0

0

0

Dorothy Day Hall

0

0

0

0

Flannery O’Connor Hall

0

0

0

0

Gallagher Court

0

0

0

0

Hammerman House

0

0

0

0

Hopkins Court

0

0

0

0

Lange Court

0

0

0

0

McAuley Hall

0

0

0

0

Newman Towers

1

0

0

$20

10/14/10

Mulch Fire

Education, increased watering of garden and landscaped areas

Seton Court

0

0

0

0

Southwell Hall

0

0

0

0

Tantallion Court

0

0

0

0