Loyola University Maryland

Graduate Alumni Ambassadors

School of Education

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Emily DesimoneEmily Desimone

Special Education Teacher, Baltimore City Public Schools, Roland Park Elementary/Middle School
M.Ed. Special Education, ‘14

After completing four years in the undergraduate program, Baltimore had become my home and Loyola had become my family. With a degree in Elementary Education and a minor in special education, I chose to continue my education and apply to the Special Education Master’s program. With no application fee as a Loyola undergraduate student, I applied immediately. I was thrilled when my professor pulled me over after class one day to tell me that I was in! My mother, a speech therapist, also followed a similar path at Loyola so I was excited to follow in her footsteps. 

Fresh out of college, I was ready for a new challenge to see where the world would take me. I got a job, started graduate school, had surgery, was in physical therapy, and in my free time tried to have a social life. While it seems overwhelming, I managed. I was able to fit in my practicum hours at my work place, carpool with my classmate twice a week to the Timonium campus, and hobble to physical therapy in between. I was able to complete the program within a year and a half. While I took the fast track, Loyola also makes it accessible for everyone with all different schedules. While challenging, Loyola prepared me to take on any obstacle that comes in my way.   

I would not be where I am today if it wasn’t for Loyola. I gained relationships with my professors who guided me throughout my practicum, helped me choose classes, and were never more than a phone call or text away. With each new course, I developed new skills and strategies that I am able to use every day in my classroom.  I thought finding a job would be difficult however with the connections that Loyola has throughout the Baltimore community, job hunting could not have gone any smoother! With an amazing recommendation from my professor, I became a Special Education teacher within weeks after completing the master’s program. Loyola has continued to help me not only in my career but in all aspects in life.

Bridget EhmannBridget Ehmann

General Educator for English, Loch Raven High School
MAT, ‘15

While both an undergraduate and graduate at Loyola University, I found Loyola’s mission of educating students in accordance with the mindset of cura personalis to be refreshing. The idea of learning in regards to the ‘whole person’ taught me to look past the grade I earned and more into the skills and qualities of a successful person I earned each day in and out of class. During my internship, I was able to learn the importance of collaborating with colleagues and connecting with students by being a part of team planning, extra-curricular activities, and meaningful observations. Although the internship environment cannot be compared to having a classroom of your own, the opportunity to attempt integrating the strategies learned in the educational program relating to classroom management and student centered learning lead to great feedback from experiences teachers and students.

Because I was exposed to teaching during my sophomore year during an informal internship experience at Baltimore City College, I felt confident in continuing my education at Loyola for their Masters in Teaching program which was new the year I was first involved. Throughout my formal internships in both the middle school and high school level, I continued to grow as an educator by remembering Loyola’s mission to be willing to continue learning and never letting go of the perspective of a student. I now teach my students that it is not enough to be solely interested in being a student to earn good grades and that they need to value the process of learning through academic and experiential learning opportunities. Loyola University melds well with my awareness of how each person vastly influences themselves and each other and I aim to instill that understanding in each one of my students so they go on to be life-long learners and teachers in their own way.

Megan HermanMegan Herman

Classroom Teacher, Montgomery County Public Schools
M.Ed. Educational Leadership, ‘18 (expected)

I chose Loyola due to its focus on students and their personal self.

Also, Loyola has a cohort partnership with Montgomery County Public Schools, where I work, so it makes it very convenient to take classes. I hope to use my degree to become an administrator in the future.

 

Christy KontosChristy Kontos

Christy Kontos
English Teacher, Catonsville High School
MAT, ’15  


A Jesuit education at Loyola taught me to regard my students as more than just their numbers - GPA, SAT, ACT, class ranking. Our educational system is built upon data, but the students who enter my class everyday are human beings that have more worth than these qualitative rankings. A Loyola education means seeing a person as a whole. In my classroom, that means seeing how far a student can go instead of just how far they have already come.