Loyola University Maryland

Loyola Votes

Calendar of Events

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Loyola Votes Kick-Off Event

Friday, September 16, 2016

11:30 a.m.-2 p.m.
Quad

Join us for an Election 2016 Kick-Off Rally from 11:30am-2:00pm in the Quad on September 16th .  Pocket constitutions and absentee ballot information will be available.   

Common Text Events

Tuesday, September 20

Selma: Film Screening

As the United States of America approaches the 2016 presidential election, it is essential that we remember important events of our nation's history which continue to shape our country today. Join us at the Senator Theater for a screening of the 2014 feature film, Selma. This remarkable film tells the story of an Alabama city in 1965 which became the starting point of the historic civil rights march from Selma to Montgomery which ended in President Lyndon Johnson signing the Voting Rights Act of 1965 as a result of the non-violent work of Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. and his community of followers. Co-sponsored by the Senator Film Series.

7 p.m.
Senator Theater
Loyola students receive a free ticket with their Loyola ID. Free shuttles will leave the campus from the Library beginning at 6pm and cycle every 15 minutes after prior to the 7pm screening time.

Wednesday, September 21

2016 Constitution Day Lecture: Does the Political Establishment Matter Anymore?

Dr. Julian Zelizer is the Malcolm Stevenson Forbes, Class of 1941, Professor of History and Public Policy at Princeton and one of the country’s foremost political historians and commentators. He has written extensively on American politics in the post-World War II era. His most recent book, The Fierce Urgency of Now: Lyndon Johnson, Congress, and the Battle for the Great Society, was published in 2015. He frequently writes for newspapers and news magazines and appears regularly on news programs (especially CNN) to offer historical context and commentary on contemporary political developments. Zelizer is an ideal speaker to talk about this year's common text, How to Win an Election, and can offer perspective commentary and historical context for this year's presidential election. Co-sponsored by the Center for the Humanities, the History and Political Science departments, and with support from a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

5 p.m.
McGuire Hall West- Event is free and open to the public.

Monday, September 26

National Debate Viewing Parties

Join your peers to watch the 2016 National Debates live. If you are not registered to vote, stop by the Avila Lounge viewing to register! Sponsored by the Office of Student Life.

9 p.m.
Campion Tower: 1st Floor Lobby
Gardens Area: Avila Lounge
Newman Towers: Upper Iggy's
Eastside Area

Monday, October 3

Voter Registration Drive outside Boulder Cafe, 12pm-3pm

Thursday, October 6

Voter Registration Drive outside Boulder Cafe, 12pm-3pm

Thursday, October 6

How to Win an Election in America's Constitutional Framework

Dr. James Ceaser, Professor of Politics at the University of Virginia will situate Cicero in the context of the Electoral College and the Constitution. This event is supported by a grant from the National Endowment for the Humanities.

6 p.m.
Library Auditorium- Event is free and open to the public.

Sunday, October 9

National Debate Viewing Parties

Join your peers to watch the 2016 National Debates live. Sponsored by the Office of Student Life.

9 p.m.
Hillside Area: Flannery O'Connor Hall 4th Floor Lobby
Newman Towers: Upper Iggy's

Monday, October 10

Voter Registration Drive outside Boulder Cafe, 12pm-3pm

Wednesday, October 19

National Debate Viewing Parties

Join your peers to watch the 2016 National Debates live. Sponsored by the Office of Student Life.

9 p.m.
Charleston Area: Hopkins Court Lounge
Newman Towers: Upper Iggy's

Thursday, October 20

American Politics: Whose Voice is it Anyway?

As our nation's population becomes increasingly more diverse, it seems we have also become more divided and violent as a result. This year specifically the media coverage of our upcoming presidential election has made us more aware of the role of marginalized groups in American politics, while also asking us to consider what exactly that role is. This community panel will serve as a space where the Loyola community can come together and consider what it truly means to live in a representative democracy, and ask ourselves who it is that is being represented? Co-sponsored by the Caribbean Students Union.

6 p.m.
McGuire Hall West

Thursday, October 27

Public Debate

Co-sponsored by the Loyola Rhetoric Society.

5 p.m.
McGuire Hall

Friday, October 28

What Presidential Debates Reveal

Dr. Kathleen Hall Jamieson is the Elizabeth Ware Packard Professor of Communication at the Annenberg School for Communication and Walter and Leonore Annenberg Director of the Annenberg Public Policy Center at the University of Pennsylvania. Her research areas include political communication, rhetorical theory and criticism, studies of various forms of campaign communication, and the discourse of the presidency. Sponsored by the Writing Department with grants from the Center for the Humanities, Messina, and the National Endowment for the Humanities.

5 p.m.
McGuire Hall- Event is free and open to the public.

Friday, November 4

Cicero on How to Win an Election

Dr. Philip Freeman, translator of Loyola’s 2016 common text, Cicero’s How to Win an Election will discuss how tactics of ancient politicians are evident in present day politics. Dr. Freeman is a Professor of Classics at Luther College and author of several books. Sponsored by the Honors Program, Classics Department, and support from a grant by the National Endowment for the Humanities.

3 p.m.
4th Floor Program Room- Event is free and open to the public.