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Loyola ranks in top 6% of U.S. universities for return on investment

April 14, 2015 | By Nick Alexopulos

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Loyola University Maryland has again been included among elite U.S. colleges and universities that demonstrate substantial return on investment, ranking in the top 6 percent of more than 1,200 institutions nationwide in’s 2015 College ROI Report. Loyola rises into the top 5 percent when financial aid is considered and overall is up from the its top 7 percent ranking on the same list in 2014.

PayScale is an online compensation database that has released a college ROI report annually for the last several years. Loyola's ranking for 2015 is based on the net income a graduate will earn 20 years after graduation after subtracting both what he or she would have earned as a high school graduate and the total cost of college attendance. PayScale’s formula showed an increase of 10 percent in Loyola’s ROI over last year.

“Value is one of the most important factors students and their families consider when choosing a college, and the significance of value will only grow as we move into the future,” said Rev. Brian F. Linnane, S.J., president of Loyola. “We remain committed, in accordance with our Jesuit mission, to offering an accessible educational experience of exceptional quality that inspires students to excel in the classroom and prepares them for success in their professional endeavors.”

Loyola appeared on additional specialty lists in the ROI report:

  • No. 19, Best Value Colleges for Business Majors
  • No. 7, Best Value Religious Schools
  • No. 3, Best Value Colleges in Maryland
  • No. 39 (of 407), Best Value Private Colleges

Loyola joins fellow Patriot League schools Lafayette College, Lehigh University, and Bucknell University in the top 75. Santa Clara University is the only Jesuit institution ranked higher than Loyola overall.

PayScale generated the rankings using data collected from employees who successfully completed a PayScale survey. Only graduates who are employed full-time and paid with either an hourly wage or an annual salary were included in the report. Also, only employees who have earned a bachelor's degree and no higher degrees were included, and careers that require advanced degrees, such as law or medicine, are not included.

More information is available at

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