Loyola University Maryland

Drug Free Schools Act Amendments of 1989 Memorandum Documenting Effectiveness and Consistency Reviews

Biennial Review 2016


This memorandum documents review of Loyola University’s Alcohol and Other Drug (AOD) harm reduction and enforcement programs, and intervention, referral, and support services, for effectiveness and consistency. This review applies to programs and services for students and employees of Loyola University Maryland. The University’s Student Development Division, in conjunction with the efforts of the Office of Student Life, Campus Police, and the Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion (SSWP), is primarily responsible for AOD services and enforcement of sanctions for drug and alcohol-related violations of community standards by its students. The University’s AOD programs, policies, and enforcement procedures for employees, including its Employee Assistance Program, are the responsibility of the institution’s Office of Human Resources.

Distribution of Documents

As required by the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act of 1989, Loyola University Maryland distributes the Annual Notification of University’s Drug and Alcohol Abuse Prevention Program by email to all students (undergraduate and graduate) and employees to their University email address. These emails are sent in September, January, and June to ensure that all University members are provided with this information, regardless of enrollment time, and/or start-date. Additionally, the Annual Notification is embedded on University websites, including those for the Office of Human Resources and the Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion. All new employees are provided with a copy of the Annual Notification and Biennial Review during their new employee orientation.

Section 1 Services and Programs for Students Consistency of Alcohol and Other Drug Programs:

Loyola University Maryland consistently utilizes best practices to create and implement their comprehensive prevention program, which is aimed at reducing student substance use. The following table outlines the University’s 3-in-1 prevention framework.



Loyola University Maryland’s 3-in-1 AOD Environmental Management Prevention Model

Interventions at the individual level for students

  • Screenings and referral for education or treatment

  • Education interventions

  • Support groups

  • Parental notification of policy violations

  • Faculty/Administrator/Staff/ Student Leaders conversations with students

  • Athletic drug testing


Interventions at the student population (group) level

  • Consistent policy enforcement

  • Referral of students with conduct violations for education and/or evaluation and treatment

  • Alcohol-free social activities

  • Think About It online education requirement

  • Social norms messaging campaigns

  • Outreach and prevention presentations and programs

  • Academic rigor

  • Friday and morning classes

  • Living-learning communities

  • Peer education

  • Substance Free Housing

Interventions at the University and surrounding community level

  • Loyola AOD Task Force

  • University representation on local coalitions

  • University representation in neighborhood associations

  • Participation in the Maryland State Collaborative to Reduce Underage Drinking and Associated Harm


The following procedures represent the key programmatic elements of our campus prevention efforts.


Individual Level Interventions for Students:

Re-entry to the University:

The Medical Review Committee within the Dean of Students Office evaluates the students’ medical documentation prior to them returning from a medical leave of absence, during which treatment was recommended. Upon the student’s return into the University, the counselor in the Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion will work with the student to develop an after- care plan, which involves coordinating and establishing a supportive network as the student continues through the University. Often the establishment of the plan for ongoing support begins while the student is receiving treatment. Students are able to meet with the counselor at SSWP prior to their return to the University to establish a therapeutic relationship and supportive structures to help in their transition back to the University. This support can included individual counseling, group counseling, referrals to peer-support groups, in addition to access to the collegiate recovery community.

Accomplishments during 2014-2016

  1. As a result of structural changes within the University the offices of Student Support Services and Alcohol and Drug Education and Support Services, and Health Promotion (ADESS-HP), merged to form the new office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion (SSWP). This office now addresses AOD use, promoting holistic wellness, and overseeing support for students who demonstrate a high-level of emotional concerns.

  2. During the Fall 2014 semester Student Support and Wellness Promotion was awarded a

    $10,000 grant from Transforming Youth Recovery to develop a collegiate recovery community. The Cardoner Recovery Program, the first of its kind in Maryland, supports students in recovery from addiction; by providing on-campus support groups, connections to peer-support programs in the community, and opportunities for social outings with other students in recovery.

  3. During the 2014-15 academic year the use of the Think About It program expanded its “Alcohol Sanction” module to provide educational interventions to students studying abroad who were found in violation of the University’s alcohol policies.

  4. At the end of the 2014-15 academic year Loyola University Maryland was awarded an NCAA CHOICES grant for the 2015-16, 2016-17, and 2017-18 academic years. We hope that through this grant Loyola can initiate and sustain major programming efforts to reduce alcohol abuse and its associated consequences among student athletes and non-athletes. This grant is intended to leverage the visibility of athletes as they promoted programs that focus on responsible drinking behaviors and harm reduction practices.

  5. In the fall of 2015, The Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion, in collaboration with the Office of Student Life, restructured the referral process for mandated students to provide increasingly tailored interventions for students.

  6. The 2015-16 academic year marked a new partnership between The Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion and the Office of International Programs, as they combined efforts to study alcohol use behaviors among students who were studying abroad at various locations and develop a subsequent set of social norms interventions that aimed to reduce potentially harmful drinking behaviors.

  7. In the fall of 2015, the University Alcohol Task Force (Formally the Loyola AOD Committee) created and implemented a pilot study which assessed pre-gaming campus culture. Data from this survey will be used to shape and inform campus programing and policy in the future.

  8. As part of the NCAA CHOICES grant, Loyola University Maryland has greatly expanded the number and type of late night substance-free programs on campus.

  9. As a result of our comprehensive prevention program based on the National Institute on Alcohol Abuse and Alcoholism’s 3-in 1 model, the 2015-2016 academic year saw a 58% reduction in the number of students mandated to SSWP for AOD related services. These data were collected from our electronic records software.

  10. By enhancing interdepartmental collaboration the University has combined the annual notices required by the Drug Free Schools and Communities Act so that there is one document that addresses both the needs of students as well as employees. This document is distributed to the campus community through direct emailing to all members of the campus community as well as by making it available on numerous university websites (i.e.,

    Human Resources, and Student Support and Wellness Promotion) for ongoing access.

  11. The Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion, Student Life, Campus Police, and Student Government Association have created and implemented a Responsible Action Protocol which provides amnesty for any student who helps to assist a peer who is experiencing an alcohol emergency.

  1. The implementation of the Maxient database has increased the University’s capability for tracking students’ completion of conduct-related sanctions. Maxient became the primary records platform during the 2015-2016 academic year. This change has allowed for increased interdepartmental collaboration in supporting students. Unfortunately, as a result of adopting this new data collection platform, we no longer have access to our conduct data from the 2014-15 academic year, included in this report. Fortunately, those data were accessible through the Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion.


    Effectiveness:

    The combined disciplinary, educational and treatment interventions are considered to be highly effective, particularly with regard to reducing recidivism. For example, during the 2015-16 academic year, 12 students were required to complete mandatory drug testing as part of their sanction. Any student with a positive test result, received further treatment. During the same period of time, none of the students who were drug tested had a positive urine test.

    A total of 69.9 percent of all sanctions assigned to students for alcohol and drug violations were completed. These sanctions include individual screening with the Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion, on and off campus drug treatment, mandatory drug testing, and educational interventions. The recidivism rate for students who receive disciplinary sanctions for alcohol and/or drug policy violations was 26.4 percent.

    We have been using our data from first-year students to assess the impact of the campus drinking culture on changing new students’ substance use behaviors. Over the course of the last three years, there has been a five percent decrease in the number of students having seven or more drinks, as well as a four percent decrease in the number of students’ pre-gaming behaviors. The increase in programming contributed to the reduction in our campus conduct-related incidents, from 1,078 cases in 2014-15 to 795 cases in 2015-16. During the same time period, the number of hospital transports for alcohol overdoses decreased from 33 transports to 17 transports. Beginning in the 2016-2017 academic year, we will be implementing the results of the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) to measure program effectiveness and behavioral change among students. The ACHA-NCHA will be replacing the Loyola University Student Survey (LUSS), a home-grown survey designed to track student behaviors and program effectiveness. As part of this transition, the LUSS was not conducted during the timeframe of this review. Alternatively, data from the Think About It program has served as our outcome measure.

    Section II Services and Programs for Employees

    Consistency of Alcohol and Other Drug Program Policies:

    The Loyola University Drug and Alcohol Policies for Faculty and Staff are reviewed with all new hires at their orientation. The Drug and Alcohol Policies, Health Information, Services and Benefits for Faculty, Administrators, and Staff are sent out to all employees on an annual basis.

    Support Services and Reporting Violations:

    Loyola’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP): includes on-site work/life sessions, assessment, counseling and referral services that are free and confidential to employees and family members residing in their households. Services are available to benefits-eligible faculty and staff. The EAP provides short-term assistance in a confidential and professional manner to help with a variety of personal and career-related issues. The plan offers assistance with workplace conflicts, marital or family problems, emotional distress (depression, stress), alcohol abuse, drug abuse, legal issues, locating child and elder care, financial counseling and other personal difficulties.

    There is no cost to eligible employees for the services provided. Five free counseling sessions are provided per problem area. If outside referral services are recommended, fees charged by those professionals are the responsibility of the employee in coordination with the employee’s health insurance. EAP services are available 24 hours a day, 7 days a week.

    Reporting to Supervisors, Human Resources or Anonymously:

    All members of the University Community are encouraged to promptly report any behavior that is in violation of the law, or University policy. This includes, but is not limited, to drug or alcohol policy violations. Faculty, staff or other community member can report incidents directly to their supervisor or chair, human resources, or Ethics Point. If any faculty, staff, administrator, or other community member has information regarding behavior that is in violation of the law or University policy, the preferred method of reporting these concerns is to speak with a supervisor or an appropriate person in the department that has oversight authority for the policy or activity to which the concern relates. If there is any discomfort in relaying such concerns directly to supervisors or managers, individuals may contact the University’s Ethics Point. The Ethics Point provides a confidential, anonymous mechanism for reporting concerns regarding any aspect of University compliance. Anonymous reports may be filed by calling 888-263-8680, or via the website at: https://secure.ethicspoint.com/domain/en/report_company.asp?clientid=18799#.


    Section III Assessment of Campus Programs

    Loyola University Maryland has developed a comprehensive campus prevention and intervention program which is consistently implemented. The following section provides statistical information regarding the behavioral trends and treatment utilization of students and employees, in addition to conduct and disciplinary data.

    Student Behavior Trends:

    We utilize the Titanium 10 Software Program to consistently track AOD use and behavior trends. Data are collected from students who complete screenings and/or evaluations for substance use related issues during the intake process. The following data are based on changes since the last biennial review period:

Section IV Achievements and Goals Program goals achievement since last biennial review:

As previously stated Loyola University Maryland implemented a responsible action protocol to provide medical amnesty for student seeking help for a peer in the event of an alcohol emergency. The implementation of this protocol satisfies our first goal included in the last biennial review which was to implement a medical amnesty policy.

Our second goal was to reduce drinking within residence halls and among students of legal drinking age. To address this goal, we created that Alcohol Task Force, and upon a review of our campus drinking culture, we determined that addressing the culture of pre-gaming would best serve our goal of reducing overall alcohol consumption. During the 2015-16 academic year we

conducted a pilot survey to assess campus pre-gaming trends and motivations. The results of this pilot survey were disseminated to campus partners to increase strategic planning of substance free late night activities. We are encouraged that there is progress in this area due to the significant decline in the number of conduct violations related to AOD, going from 1,078 cases in 2014-15 down to 795 cases in 2015-16 and the 48% decline of alcohol transports from the previous year.

Recommendations for the next review period:

I. In an effort to improve the quality of the interventions provided to students, the Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion, in collaboration with the Office of Student Life, will be working toward implementing AOD evaluations for all students found in violation of the University’s alcohol and drug policies beginning August 2016. This change is designed to ensure that the interventions that students receive are appropriate for their individual substance use behaviors, and not simply limited to the committed violation itself. We are hopeful that this targeted response and treatment approach may, contribute to a decline in recidivism within our conduct system.

II. There is currently not a policy which explicitly outlines the protocol for the distribution of alcoholic beverages to students of legal drinking age at University- sponsored events. Over the next review period, we will be endeavoring to craft and implement such a policy, in order to support social events through reducing overconsumption.

  1. Loyola University Maryland will be administering the American College Health Association-National College Health Assessment (ACHA-NCHA) during the spring 2017 semester. The information gathered from this assessment will be used to update and create a new social norms campaign for the campus community.

  2. The University is committed to enhancing the variety and number of programs available to employees to help address substance use. In addition to increasing the number of programs, we will be increasing our efforts to gather additional information on the utilization of these programs.

    We are confident that by addressing the aforementioned goals, we will greatly enhance our efforts to address and prevent substance use at Loyola University Maryland.

    This report was compiled by:

    Zachary Hitchens, M.S.,CAS, LCADC, NCC Assistant Director

    Student Support and Wellness Promotion

    Appendices


    Table of Contents

    1. Alcohol and Other Drug Policies

    2. Explanation of SSWP Interventions for Conduct Referrals

Appendix I


Loyola University Maryland Alcohol Policy from the 2014-15 Community Standards (For Students)

Alcohol Policy

Loyola University Maryland fully supports and requires compliance with Maryland’s alcoholic beverage laws. These laws include prohibitions on the possession or consumption of alcohol by persons under age 21; furnishing alcohol to or obtaining alcohol for a person under age 21; and misrepresenting one’s age in order to obtain alcohol. Only those students who are 21 years of age and older are permitted to have alcohol in their apartments. Guests who are 21 years of age and older may not bring alcohol to a room/apartment/suite where at least one person is under the age of 21. Students 21 years of age or older may possess and consume alcohol in the privacy of their rooms, suites, or apartments in single-serving containers only. All students are expected not to abuse alcohol, but rather to drink responsibly or abstain.


Note: Parents and/or guardians will be notified in writing if their first year son or daughter under age 21 is found responsible for an alcohol violation involving use or possession. Core Advisors will be notified.

Violations of the alcohol policy include, but are not limited to, the following:

  1. Having open containers of alcoholic beverages or consumption of alcohol in any public area on Loyola owned or leased property, regardless of age (e.g., lounges, corridors, outdoors, etc.) First offense: $75 fine and a written reprimand, in addition to sanctions for underage possession if applicable.

  2. Unauthorized possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages. “Possession” means having an alcoholic beverage under one’s charge or control. Students under age 21 may not possess or consume alcoholic beverages at any time. Students age 21 or older generally may not possess or consume alcoholic beverages in the presence of persons under age 21; however, they may consume or possess alcoholic beverages in the presence of their roommates in their own residence unit.

    Minimum Standard Sanctions for Alcohol Violations

  3. Selling, furnishing, or giving any beverage containing alcohol to any person under 21 years of age. Standard sanction: deferred suspension from the residence halls, $200 fine per individual host, and a referral for alcohol education.

    The student social host policy will apply if alcohol is available in the room. Thus, the host is also responsible for misconduct if he/she passively allows prohibited alcohol use to occur within his/her room.

  4. Using or possessing excessive amounts or prohibited sources of alcohol (e.g., kegs, beerballs); using or possessing items or devices that encourage excessive drinking (e.g., bars, beer bongs, funnels); or organizing or participating in activities that encourage excessive drinking (e.g., beer pong, drinking games, or contests). Standard sanction: deferred suspension from the residence halls, $200 fine, and referral for alcohol education.

  5. Charging a fee when hosting parties. Standard sanction: deferred suspension from the residence halls, $200 fine, and a referral for alcohol education.

  6. Being intoxicated or exhibiting behaviors associated with intoxication or impairment. Standard sanction: deferred suspension from the residence halls, $150 fine, and referral for an alcohol screening.

    In cases that involve the operation of a motor vehicle, the University reserves the right to consider more serious sanctions including suspension or expulsion.

  7. Providing false identification:

    g1. Possessing, conspiring to obtain, or using false identification. Standard sanction: deferred suspension from the residence halls and a $250 fine per false ID. False IDs confiscated by the University will be forwarded to the appropriate State authorities.

    g2. Manufacturing, selling, or distributing false identification.

    Standard sanction: expulsion.

  8. Multiple or repeated violations of the Alcohol Policy.

  9. Possession of empty alcohol containers.


    Loyola University Maryland Alcohol Policy from the 2015-16 Community Standards(For Students)


    1. Alcohol Policy

Loyola University Maryland fully supports and requires compliance with Maryland’s alcoholic beverage laws. These laws include prohibitions on the possession or consumption of alcohol by persons under age 21; furnishing alcohol to or obtaining alcohol for a person under age 21; and misrepresenting one’s age in order to obtain alcohol. Only those students who are 21 years of age and older are permitted to have alcohol in their apartments. Guests who are 21 years of age and older may not bring alcohol to a room/apartment/suite where at least one person is under the age of 21. Students 21 years of age or older may possess and consume alcohol in the privacy of their rooms, suites, or apartments in single-serving containers only. All students are expected not to abuse alcohol, but rather to drink responsibly or abstain.

Note: Parents and/or guardians will be notified in writing if their first year son or daughter under age 21 is found responsible for an alcohol violation involving use or possession. Core Advisors will be notified.

Violations of the alcohol policy include, but are not limited to, the following:

a. Having open containers of alcoholic beverages or consumption of alcohol in any public area on Loyola owned or leased property, regardless of age (e.g., lounges, corridors, outdoors, etc.) First offense: $75 fine and a written reprimand, in addition to sanctions for underage possession if applicable.

b. Unauthorized possession or consumption of alcoholic beverages. “Possession” means having an alcoholic beverage under one’s charge or control. Students under age 21 may not possess or consume alcoholic beverages at any time. Students age 21 or older generally may not possess or consume alcoholic beverages in the presence of persons under age 21; however, they may consume or possess alcoholic beverages in the presence of their roommates in their own residence unit.

Minimum Standard Sanctions for Alcohol Violations

University property or as part of its activities.


8.13 Smoking Policy

The University has an interest in providing a healthy and productive work environment for all employees. Therefore, smoking is prohibited inside all buildings and vehicles owned or leased by the University. Smoking outside is authorized in areas that are a minimum of 30 feet from University building entrances and exits. Smokers are responsible for the appropriate disposal of their cigarette butts, wrappers and matches.


Faculty

The following information can be found in the Faculty Handbook at: https://inside.loyola.edu/worklife/governance/academic/Documents/academicaffairs/documents/ FINAL-2014-2015%20Faculty%20Handbook.pdf


C. Policy on Alcoholic Beverages

Maryland State Law prohibits any person under 21 years of age from being in possession of, or under the influence of, alcoholic beverages. Loyola University does not endorse or condone violation of the law of the State of Maryland.

The text of the University’s Alcohol Policy may be found in the Student Handbook and in

Appendix E of this document (Faculty Handbook).

Please consult the Director of Student Activities if there are any questions regarding the use of alcoholic beverages on campus.


Explanation of SSWP Interventions for Judicial Referrals

Appendix II

The Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion (SSWP) Department seeks to foster an environment that supports responsible decision-making regarding alcohol and other drug use, on the Loyola campus and in the Baltimore community. The Office of Student Support and Wellness Promotion provides a number of services, supports, and programs to fulfill this philosophy. The list below includes the interventions that are offered to students with alcohol or other drug use concerns, and to students who are sanctioned through the conduct system.


Service

Explanation of Service

CHOICE

(choosing healthy options in campus environment)

CHOICE is a 90 minute session.

Students who go through the CHOICE program will:

  • Thoughtfully reflect and discern on their drinking behaviors and choices.

  • Examine risks associated with alcohol and other drug use.

  • Articulate strategies to make safer choices about drinking.

  • Obtain accurate information about social norms at Loyola

BASICS

(Brief Alcohol Screening and Intervention for College Students)

BASICS is an evidenced based program designed to reduce harm associated drinking, conducted in two individual 60 minute session with a trained counselor.

Students that go through the BASICS program will:

  • Examine their alcohol use through the personalized feedback report

  • Debunk myths and increase the their base of accurate information about alcohol and its effects

  • Devise strategies to minimize risks associated with alcohol use.

  • Increase motivation to change current risky behaviors, and problem solving about potential barriers that might compromise initiation or maintenance of change

  • Identify realistic strategies to reduce their risk of future problems and make safer choices.

  • Obtain comparison of their alcohol use with other students at Loyola University Maryland.

BIM (Brief Intervention for Marijuana)

BIM is based on the same evidenced based science as BASICS but is specifically designed to address marijuana use. It consists of two individual 60 minute sessions with a trained counselor.

Students who go through BIM will:

  • Examine their marijuana use through a personalized feedback report

  • Debunk myths and increase the their base of accurate information about marijuana and its effects

  • Devise strategies to minimize risks associated with marijuana use.

  • Increase motivation to change current risky behaviors, and problem solving about potential barriers that might compromise initiation or maintenance of change

  • Identify realistic strategies to reduce their risk of future problems and make safer choices.


  • Obtain comparison of their marijuana use with other students at Loyola University Maryland.

Screening

Students will be evaluated by a licensed counselor to identify what program will best meet the needs of that student. Possible outcomes include recommendations to:

  • CHOICE program

  • BASICS

  • AOD Counseling

  • Group programs

  • Referral to Loyola University Maryland Counseling center

  • Referral to outside AOD program and/or 12 step program