Loyola University Maryland

Department of Classics

Recent Offerings

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Classes Offered Spring 2015

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 102-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.- Dr. David Jacobson
A continuation of Latin 101 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 103-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.–Staff
A continuation of Latin 102 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 104–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.- Dr. Robert Miola
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 103 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 380–Ovid-Section .01
TTH 3:05-4:30 p.m.- Dr. Joseph Walsh
A reading of extensive selections from the brilliant poet of love and change; human psychology as seen through the lens of the classical myths

Greek Courses

GK 102-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 102-Introductory Greek I-Section .02
TTH 10:50-12:05 p.m.-Dr. Martha Taylor
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 302- Advanced Greek II- Section .01
MWF 12:00-112:50 p.m.- Dr. Thomas McCreight
Readings in Greek at the advanced level. When possible, choice of author or genre is based on student preference.

GK 360- Independent Study: Greek
Dr. Robert Miola
An independent study in Greek language and/or literature. Topics vary.

Classical Civilization Course

English Core Courses

CL/EN 212- The Classical Epics- Section .01
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m.- Dr. David Jacobson
A study of the epic poetry of Homer and Virgil in translation, with an emphasis on the poetry's background, value, and influence. The course may include a short survey of other epics.

Messina Seminars

CL 291D- The Gladiator- Section .01
TTH 10:50-12:05 p.m. and T 1:40-2:30 p.m.- Dr. Joseph Walsh
A first-year Messina seminar that uses ancient and modern texts (e.g., The Colosseum, The Roman Games: A Sourcebook) and films (e.g., Gladiator, Spartacus, The Hunger Games)to illuminate the intersection of cruelty, ideology, and entertainment in the ancient arena.

CL 292D- Race, Conq., & Id Anc N Africa- Section .01
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m. and W 11:00-11:50 a.m.- Dr. Thomas McCreight
A first-year Messina seminar that examines questions of race, imperialism, and cultural/ethnic identity in ancient North Africa, both before and after the Roman conquest. Students are exposed to global diversity and issues of justice, especially with reference to conquered populations, and to questions of assimilation and resistance.

History Core Courses

CL/HS 327- Disasters of Ancient Rome- Section .01
TTH 12:15-1:30 p.m.- Dr. Joseph Walsh
An examination of ancient Rome's greatest disasters: the destruction of Pompeii, the Great Fire of Rome, floods, and plagues. Students investigate the causes of these events; the Romans' efforts to navigate and make sense of them; and the transformations they brought to the ancients' environment, behavior, and thought.

CL/HS 329- Women in Greece and Rome- Section .01
MWF 11:00-11:50 a.m.- Dr. Martha Taylor
An examination of the lives of and attitudes toward women in ancient Greece and Rome. Classic texts of ancient literature are read, masterpieces of art are viewed, and the sociology of ancient women is probed. Topics include the family; prostitution; women of the imperial family; Cleopatra; health, child bearing, and birth control; the source and psychology of Greek misogyny; jet-setters and women's liberation under the early Roman Empire; women and work; women in myth; women in early Christianity; the legacy of classical civilization for modern women.

CL/HS 339- Fall of Two Empires; Rome & Byzantium- Section .01
TTH 12:15-1:30 p.m.- Dr. Kelly DeVries
The Roman and Byzantine Empires each lasted a thousand years, yet both fell. How? This course examines the reasons, internal and external, that brought an end to both empires; how they declined; and how they finally dissolved. An investigation of how the political instability brought about by increasingly weak absolutist governments; the inabilities of their armies and navies to adapt to changes brought about by technological innovations and economic restraints; and the invasions of powerful outside cultural, religious, and military forces played roles in destroying two of the greatest States in history.

 

Other

Theology Courses

CL/TH 224- Gospels & Earliest Churches- Section .01
TTH 4:30-5:45 p.m.- Dr. Heather Parker
Explores what we can discover about Jesus and the earliest Christian communities from the texts of the Gospels and other early Christian literature. Constantly examines how such knowledge is relevant to Christian life today.

CL/TH 224- Gospels & Earliest Churches- Section .02
TTH 3:05-4:20 p.m.- Dr. Heather Parker
Explores what we can discover about Jesus and the earliest Christian communities from the texts of the Gospels and other early Christian literature. Constantly examines how such knowledge is relevant to Christian life today.

CL/TH 229- Images of God in Scripture- Section .01
TTH 3:05-4:20 p.m.- Dr. Lesley DiFransico
Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God.

CL/TH 229- Images of God in Scripture- Section .02
TTH 6:00-7:15 p.m.- Dr. Lesley DiFransico
Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God.

CL/TH 246- Who is Jesus?- Section .01
MWF 8:00-8:50 a.m.- Dr. Rebekah Eklund
Explores the identity of Jesus Christ, as expressed in Scripture, the doctrine and tradition of the Church, as well as in art and literature. Emphasizes the historical context of Jesus' life, the variety of ways in which the significance of that life has been articulated over the centuries, and the ways in which one might discern faithful from unfaithful articulations.

CL/TH 246- Who is Jesus?- Section .02
MWF 9:00-9:50 a.m.- Dr. Rebekah Eklund
Explores the identity of Jesus Christ, as expressed in Scripture, the doctrine and tradition of the Church, as well as in art and literature. Emphasizes the historical context of Jesus' life, the variety of ways in which the significance of that life has been articulated over the centuries, and the ways in which one might discern faithful from unfaithful articulations.

CL 335- Intro Theology of St. Augustine- Section .01
T 6:00-8:30 p.m.- Dr. Angela Christman
Studies the life and writings of the great fifth-century bishop and theologian, Augustine of Hippo. Topics include grace, free will, scripture, and the role of civil authority.

Art History

CL/AH 308- Art of Ancient Greece- Section .01
MWF 10:00-10:50 a.m.- Dr. Martha Taylor
A survey of Greek art and architecture from the Bronze Age to the Hellenistic Era. Among the topics considered are Mycenaean tombs and palaces, the development of temple architecture, and the ways in which polytheistic religion shaped life in ancient Greece

Philosophy

CL/PL 368- Introduction to Aristotle- Section .01
TTH 1:40-2:50 p.m.- Dr. Catriona Hanley
A study of Aristotle as a systematic thinker with an integrated view of the natural world, the goals of human life, and the formal properties of thought. Primary focus on selections from Aristotle's logical works and psychological treatises, together with his Physics, Metaphysics, Ethics, and Politics.

Political Science

CL/PS 388- Socratic Political Philosophy- Section .01
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.- Dr. Diana Schaub
Socrates, the first political philosopher, wrote nothing. His unique life and thought are known only through the writings of others--both friends and enemies. By reading works by Aristophanes, Plato, Xenophon, and Nietzsche, students seek to understand the Socratic way of life. The famous "Socratic turn" is examined--Socrates' move from natural philosophy toward political philosophy and the study of "the human things." Students also examine Socrates' quarrel with poets, the Sophists, and the political community itself. Was the Athenian democracy right to put Socrates to death? Finally, Socrates' relations with his friends and students are examined--how and what did he teach them.



 

 

 



Classes Offered Fall 2014

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 101-Introductory Latin I-Section .01
MW 4:30-5:45 p.m.- Staff
An introduction to Latin grammar and syntax for students with little or no prior experience. Prerequisite: None. Counts for: classics minor.

LT 102-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MW 6-7:15 p.m.–Staff
A continuation of Latin 101 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor.

LT 103-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MW 3-4:15 p.m.–Staff
A continuation of Latin 102 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor.

LT 104–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 9-9:50 a.m.–Dr. Thomas McCreight
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 103 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor.

LT 310–Roman Tragedy-Section .01
MWF 12-12:50 p.m–Dr. David Jacobson
A close examination of Seneca's Medea. Prerequisite: LT 104 or equivalent. Counts for: classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

Greek Courses

GK 101-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.-Dr. Thomas McCreight
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 301–Intermediate Greek-Section .01
Time TBD–Dr. David Jacobson
Prerequisite: GK103 or equivalent. A reading of select works of Greek prose with close attention to their language, style and literary value. May be offered in Rome. (Spring only)

Classical Civilization Courses

English Core Courses

CL/EN 211-Classical Mythology-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
This course is devoted to the study of Greek mythology and its reception in Roman literature. Prerequisite: EN 101. Counts for: English core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor.

Messina Seminars

CL 290D-Race, Conquest, and Identity-Section .01S
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. Thomas McCreight
A first-year Messina seminar that examines questions of race, imperialism, and cultural/ethnic identity in ancient North Africa, both before and after the Roman conquest. Students are exposed to global diversity and issues of justice, especially with reference to conquered populations, and to questions of assimilation and resistance.

History Core Courses

CL/HS 313-The History of Christmas–Section .01
MWF 9:25-10:40 a.m.-Dr. Joseph Walsh
Is Christmas the commemoration of Jesus’ birth? Or is it a pagan winter festival hiding behind a thing but deceptive veil of Christian images and ideas? Students will discover that it is both of these things and a good deal more to boot. Prerequisite: HS 101; WR 100 or 101. Counts for: history core requirement; classical civilization major, classics minor, Catholic studies minor

CL/HS 326–The Golden Age of Athens-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. Martha Taylor
An examination of what has been called Athens’ golden age, focusing on the political and cultural factors which made the fifth century unique. Subjects include creation and working of Athenian democracy, victories of the Persian wars, the Greek enlightenment, Pericles’ rule of the best citizen, demagoguery and empire, the Peloponnesian War, and the “end” of Athens symbolized by the execution of Socrates. Prerequisite: HS 101; WR 100 or 101. Counts for: second history core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor. 

 

Other

CL 229-Images of God in Scripture-Section .01
TTH 3:05-4:20 p.m.-Fr. William Miller, S.J.
Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God. Same course as TH 229.

CL 229-Images of God in Scripture-Section .02
TTH 6:00-7:15 p.m.-Fr. William Miller, S.J.                                                                                                         Examines the various images/titles given to God in the Old and New Testaments from an historical theological perspective. Some images/titles discussed are God the Father, God the Mother, the Divine Warrior, the Good Shepherd, the Storm God, Christ the King, the Lamb of God, and God the Judge. Since our understanding of God is largely shaped by the image we have of Him, this course explores the influences these images/titles have had and continue to have on our approach to worship, on our concept of Church, and on our self understanding in relation to God. Same course as TH 229.

CL 241-Survey of Art: Paleolithic to Gothic-Section .01
MWF 1:00-1:50 p.m.-Dr. Letty Bonnell (Fall only)
A broad overview of art from the Paleolithic age to the Gothic era, focusing on Egyptian, Greek and Roman, early Christian and medieval art and architecture. Same course as AH110.

Classes Offered Spring 2014

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 102-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MW 4:30-5:45 p.m.- Mr. Robert Wright
A continuation of Latin 101 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 103-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.–Dr. David Jacobson
A continuation of Latin 102 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 104–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 2-2:50 a.m.–Dr. Nandini Pandey
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 103 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 333–Sallust-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m–Dr. Thomas McCreight
A close examination of the masterpiece of literary epic, with emphasis on meter, language, style, characters, and themes. A reading of about six books of the poem in the original Latin. Prerequisite: LT 104 or equivalent. Counts for: classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

Greek Courses

GK 102-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 p.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 104–Greek Literature-Section .01
Time TBD–Dr. Nandini Pandey
Prerequisite: GK103 or equivalent. A reading of select works of Greek prose and/or poetry with close attention to their language, style and literary value. May be offered in Rome. (Spring only)

Classical Civilization Courses

English Core Courses

CL/EN 213-Greek Drama-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
This course is dedicated to the study of ancient Greek tragedy and its reception.  In addition to reading the plays of Aeschylus, Sophocles, and Euripides, we will also examine how and why modern authors, directors, artists, and dancers re-imagine and retell these timeless works. Prerequisite: EN 101. Counts for: English core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor.

Messina Seminars

CL 290D-Race, Conquest, and Identity-Section .01S
MWF 9-9:50 a.m.-Dr. Thomas McCreight
A first-year Messina seminar that examines questions of race, imperialism, and cultural/ethnic identity in ancient North Africa, both before and after the Roman conquest. Students are exposed to global diversity and issues of justice, especially with reference to conquered populations, and to questions of assimilation and resistance.

CL 291-The Gladiator–Section .01S
TTH 10:50 a.m.-12:05 p.m.-Dr. Joseph Walsh
A first-year Messina seminar that uses ancient and modern texts (e.g., The Colosseum, The Roman Games: A Sourcebook) and films (e.g., Gladiator, Spartacus, The Hunger Games) to illuminate the intersection of cruelty, ideology, and entertainment in the ancient arena.

Classes Offered Fall 2013

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 101-Introductory Latin I -Section .01
TTH 6-7:15 p.m.-Mr. Robert Wright
An introduction to Latin grammar and syntax for students with little or no prior experience. Prerequisite: None. Counts for: classics minor.

LT 102-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.-Dr. Thomas McCreight
A continuation of Latin 101 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 101 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 103-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MWF 2-2:50 p.m.–Dr. David Jacobson
A continuation of Latin 102 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 104–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 103 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 200–Latin Sight Reading–Section .01
TH 9:25-10:40 a.m.-Dr. Joseph Walsh.
A 1-credit, pass/fail, course in which students read short passages of Latin “at sight,” that is, without any prior preparation. Darn good fun and an excellent way to improve your reading ability. Prerequisite: LT 102 or equivalent.

LT 308–Vergil: Aeneid–Section .01
TTH 10:50 a.m.-12:05-1:50 p.m.-Dr. Nandini Pandey.
A close examination of the masterpiece of literary epic, with emphasis on meter, language, style, characters, and themes. A reading of about six books of the poem in the original Latin. Prerequisite: LT 104 or equivalent. Counts for: classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

Greek Courses

GK 101-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 p.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 103–Introduction to Attic Prose-Section .01
MWF 12-12:50 p.m.-Dr. Robert Miola
The completion of Greek grammar and syntax and first readings in continuous attic prose. Prerequisite: GK 102 or the equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor; theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

Classical Civilization Courses

CL/EN 241-Survey of Art: Paleolithic to Gothic-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. Letty Bonnell
A broad overview of art from the Paleolithic age to the Gothic era, focusing on Egyptian, Greek and Roman, early Christian and medieval art and architecture.

English Core Courses

CL/EN 211-Classical Mythology-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. Thomas McCreight
A study of the traditional stories of the Greeks and Romans as expressed in their literature and art with an emphasis on the literature's background, value, and influence. Prerequisite: EN 101. Counts for: English core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor.

History Core Courses

CL/HS 313-The History of Christmas–Section .01
TTH 9:25-10:40 a.m.-Dr. Joseph Walsh
Is Christmas the commemoration of Jesus’ birth? Or is it a pagan winter festival hiding behind a thing but deceptive veil of Christian images and ideas? Students will discover that it is both of these things and a good deal more to boot. Prerequisite: HS 101; WR 100 or 101. Counts for: history core requirement; classical civilization major, classics minor, Catholic studies minor.

Messina Seminars

CL 290D-East Meets West-Section .01
TTH 12:15-1:30 p.m.-Dr. Nandini Pandey
A first-year Messina Seminar that examines encounters between East and West as represented in the art and literature of diverse ancient and modern cultures, including ancient Mesopotamia and Greece, the Roman Empire, the medieval Islamic world, seventeenth-century Japan, and the modern global community.


Classes Offered Spring 2013

Language Courses

Latin

LT 122-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MW 6-7:15 p.m.–Mr. Robert Wright
A continuation of Latin 121 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 121 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 123 -Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MW 4:30-5:45 p.m.–Mr. Robert Wright
A continuation of Latin 122 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 122 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 124–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.–
Dr. Nandini PandeySelected readings from authors of the golden age of Roman poetry (in particular) and prose. Analysis of styles/genres. Prerequisite: LT 123 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor.

LT 200–Latin Sight Reading .01
M 3-3:50 p.m.–Dr. Joseph Walsh

Reading of selected texts in Latin "at sight" or without preparation. May be repeated four times for credit. (Pass/Fail)

LT 300–Latin Prose Composition .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.–Dr. Nandini Pandey
Exercises in the translation of sentences and connected passages into felicitous Latin prose. Development of knowledge of correct, idiomatic expression in written Latin.

LT 325–Cicero's Speeches .01
MWF 2-2:50 p.m.–Dr. Joseph Walsh
A reading of select orations of Cicero, with particular attention to rhetorical analysis as well as to historical, political, and social background. 

Greek

GK 122–Introductory Greek II-Section .01
MWF 12-12:50 p.m.–Dr. David Jacobson
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: GK 121.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 124–Private Study: Greek Literature-Section .1T
–Dr. Martha Taylor
A reading of select works of Greek prose and/or poetry with close attention to their language, style and literary value.

GK 301–Advanced Greek I-Section .01
MW 3-4:15 p.m.–Dr. Nandini Pandey
Euripides' Medea

Classical Civilization Courses

English Core Courses

CL/EN 212–The Classical Epics-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. David Jacobson
A study of the epic poetry of Homer and Virgil in translation, with an emphasis on the poetry’s background, value, and profound influence on later literature. The course may include a short survey of other epics. Same course as EN212. Prerequisite: EN 101. Counts for: second English core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor

History Core Courses

CL/HS 300–Death of the Roman Republic-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. Martha Taylor
A study of the final century of the Roman Republic when Rome suffered under the struggles for personal power of men like Sulla, Mark Antony, and Julius Caesar. Focuses on primary sources with a particular emphasis on the writings of Cicero who documented the final years of the Republic in public speeches as well as private, biting personal letters. Same course as HS 300. Prerequisite: HS 101. Counts for: second history core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor.

History Major Courses

CL/HS 475–The Persecution of the Christians–Section .01
W 3-5:30 p.m.–Dr. Joseph Walsh
An exploration of the causes, nature, and extent of early Christian persecutions until Christianity became the official religion of the Roman Empire in the fourth century. Topics include the Jewish-Greek-Roman environment of early Christianity, Rome’s policies toward foreign cults, Christians’ reputation for extreme promiscuity and cultic atrocities, comparison with competing cults, the danger of open profession of the new faith, and Christian acceptance of the ancient world. Given the muddled understanding of the early Christian persecutions, we shall examine and dispel the myths and bring some order to the chaos.  Prerequisite: HS101, one HS300-level course, and written or electronic permission of the instructor. Counts for: classical civilization major, history major and minor, classics minor.

Classes Offered Fall 2012

Language Courses

Latin Courses

LT 121-Introductory Latin I -Section .01
MW 3-4:15 p.m.–Staff
An introduction to Latin grammar and syntax for students with little or no prior experience. Prerequisite: None. Counts for: classics minor.

LT 122-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MW 4:30-5:45 p.m.–Mr. Robert Wright
A continuation of Latin 121 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 121 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 123-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.–Staff
A continuation of Latin 122 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 122 or equivalent. Counts for: Language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 124–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.– Dr. Nandini Pandey.
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry.  Prerequisite: LT 123 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 200–Latin Sight Reading–Section .01
TBA–Dr. Joseph Walsh.
A 1-credit, pass/fail, course in which students read short passages of Latin “at sight,” that is, without any prior preparation. Darn good fun and an excellent way to improve your reading ability. Prerequisite: LT 122 or equivalent.

LT 340–Roman Comedy-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.– Dr. Robert Miola.
An examination of selected plays of Plautus and Terence, along with notice of their precursors, backgrounds, and some descendants. Students study the language of the plays and also learn to appreciate them as hilarious, artful, and living theatre. Prerequisite: LT 124 or equivalent. Counts for: classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

Greek Courses

GK 121-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 p.m.-Staff
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: None.  Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 123–Introduction to Attic Prose-Section .01
MWF 12-12:50 p.m. Dr. Joseph Walsh
The completion of Greek grammar and syntax and first readings in continuous attic prose. Prerequisite: GK 122 or the equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor; theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek.

GK 303 –Selected Readings in Greek I–Section .01
TBA–Staff
Selected readings in Greek at the advanced level. Topics vary according to student interest. Prerequisite: GK 124 or the equivalent. Counts for: classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor.

Classical Civilization Courses

English Core Courses

CL/EN 211-Classical Mythology-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.- Dr. Nandini Pandey
While all cultures tell stories about the gods in order to better understand themselves, the myths of ancient Greece and Rome are especially fascinating for their literary complexity, psychological insight, and continuing influence on Western thought. In this course, we will analyze 'great books' by Homer, the Greek tragedians, Vergil, and Ovid within their historical contexts in order to discover how they reflect, justify, and critique the religion and society of their day. We will also analyze select ancient, Renaissance and modern responses to myth (drawn from art, drama, poetry, and film) in order to explore how and why classical myths have continued to be used over the ages to examine human and divine nature.  The course requires significant reading, writing, and class participation, including several response papers, group presentations, reading quizzes, a final paper, and a final exam. Prerequisite: EN 101. Counts for: English core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor.

History Core Courses

CL/HS 313-The History of Christmas–Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. Joseph Walsh
Is Christmas the commemoration of Jesus’ birth? Or is it a pagan winter festival hiding behind a thing but deceptive veil of Christian images and ideas? Students will discover that it is both of these things and a good deal more to boot. Prerequisite: HS 101; WR 100 or 101. Counts for: history core requirement; classical civilization major, classics minor, Catholic studies minor

CL/HS 326–The Golden Age of Athens-Section .01
T/TH 9:25-10:50 a.m.-Dr. Martha Taylor
An examination of what has been called Athens’ golden age, focusing on the political and cultural factors which made the fifth century unique. Subjects include creation and working of Athenian democracy, victories of the Persian wars, the Greek enlightenment, Pericles’ rule of the best citizen, demagoguery and empire, the Peloponnesian War, and the “end” of Athens symbolized by the execution of Socrates. Prerequisite: HS 101; WR 100 or 101. Counts for: second history core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor.

Honors Seminars

CL/HN 376–Wild Justice: Self, Society, and Revenge from Antiquity to the Present–Section .01
MW 3:00-4:15 p.m.– Dr. Nandini Pandey
This course examines the theme of revenge as explored within the literature, art, and film of a range of societies from antiquity through the present. We will focus on how these works comment on and critique the philosophical, religious, and legal debates of their day, particularly regarding justice, peace and conflict, and the relation between self and other.

Classes Offered Fall 2011

Language Courses

LT 121-Introductory Latin I­-Section .01
MWF 9-9:50 a.m.–Dr. Nandini Pandey
An introduction to Latin grammar and syntax for students with little or no prior experience. Prerequisite: none. Counts for: classics minor

LT 122-Introductory Latin II-Section .01
MW 4:30-5:45 p.m.–Mr. Robert Wright
A continuation of Latin 121 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test).  Prerequisite: LT 121 or equivalent. Counts for: classics minor

LT 123-Intermediate Latin-Section .01
MWF 1-1:50 p.m.–Dr. Martha Taylor
A continuation of Latin 122 or for students with some high school background in Latin (placement through a placement test). Prerequisite: LT 122 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

LT 124–Latin Golden Age Prose and Poetry-Section .01
MWF 2–2:50 p.m.–Dr. Thomas McCreight
The first Latin reading course in which students complete the grammar textbook and begin to read continues passages of Latin from the golden age of Latin prose and poetry. Prerequisite: LT 123 or equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

GK 121-Introductory Greek I-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. Martha Taylor 
An introductory course in the grammar, syntax and vocabulary of ancient Greek. Prerequisite: none. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek

GK 123–Introduction to Attic Prose-Section .01
MWF 12-12:50 p.m.-Dr. Thomas McCreight
The completion of Greek grammar and syntax and first readings in continuous Attic prose. Prerequisite: GK 122 or the equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor, theology majors should consult with the theology department about theology credit for Greek

GK 301–Advanced Greek I-Section .01
MWF 2-2:50 p.m.-Dr. Nandini Pandey
Readings in Greek at the advanced level tailored to student interest. Fall 2011: Euripides’ Medea. Prerequisite: GK 124 or the equivalent. Counts for: language requirement, classics major, classical civilization major, classics minor

Classical Civilization Courses

English Core Courses

CL/EN 211-Classical Mythology-Section .01
MWF 10-10:50 a.m.-Dr. Nandini Pandey
A study of the traditional stories of the Greeks and Romans as expressed in their literature and art with an emphasis on the relationship of mythology to rituals and religious beliefs, legends, and folktales. Prerequisite: EN 101. Counts for: English core requirement; classical civilization major, classics minor

History Core Courses

CL/HS 312 The History of Greece-Section .01
MWF 11-11:50 a.m.-Dr. Martha Taylor
A survey course in Greek history from the Mycenaean period (c. 1600 BC) to the death of Socrates in 399. Subjects include the rise of the polis, the Greek “enlightenment,” the clash of cultures between Sparta and Athens, and the victories of the Persian wars. Prerequisite: HS 101; WR 100 or 101. Counts for: history core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor

CL/HS 313 The History of Christmas–Section .01
T/TH 9:25-10:40 a.m.–Dr. Joseph Walsh
Is Christmas the commemoration of Jesus’ birth? Or is it a pagan winter festival hiding behind a thing but deceptive veil of Christian images and ideas? Students will discover that it is both of these things and a good deal more to boot. Prerequisite: HS 101; WR 100 or 101. Counts for: history core requirement, classical civilization major, classics minor, Catholic studies minor