Loyola University Maryland

Accessibility at Loyola

Moodle

To ensure accessibility of your Moodle site, you should follow the core skills of accessibility, and make sure that the documents and resources you link to are themselves accessible.

Make Your Moodle Site Accessible

Moodle developers value and prioritize accessibility, but achieving full accessibility of a modular system is a challenge.

In general, any web-based environment is accessible where:

  • It is possible to fully navigate the interface using just a keyboard (rather than a mouse)
  • The system contains skip links so screen reader users don’t have to listen to all the navigation links every time they visit a page
  • Text equivalents exist for all non-text information
  • Color contrast is strong
  • Forms are properly labeled and marked up for keyboard-only navigation

The structure of Loyola’s instance of Moodle has some accessibility features “baked into" the design. For example:

  • Moodle includes skip links for navigation
  • It is possible to navigate Moodle and individual course websites using just a keyboard
  • The breadcrumbs that appear at the top of Moodle sites and the page titles make it easy for users who use screen readers to determine where they are within Moodle or individual course websites

Moodle also has some built-in features that help ensure that content creators are able to easily follow accessible best practices, including:

However, for individual course websites, instructors and course designers have full freedom to add content and to change the appearance and behavior of the site. Three primary factors affect the accessibility of your individual Moodle site:

Moodle becomes less accessible when any of these three components breaks down. The good news is, you as an instructor or site designer have lots of control in making sure the site is accessible. This section shows you how to maximize the accessibility of your Moodle site and how to audit it for potential accessibility issues

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