Loyola University Maryland

Equity and Inclusion at Loyola

Inclusive Scheduling

How Loyola schedules events affects climate and relates to our mission. Loyola recommends groups adopt an inclusive approach to scheduling their campus events. That means being mindful of faith traditions and also coordinating efforts with other groups so as not to unnecessarily compete or overlap.

Major Religious Holidays and Celebrations

A handy interfaith calendar of major holy days and observances. Please be sure to check the calendar before scheduling events to avoid unnecessary conflicts. Also be sure to check the events calendar to see what other groups have reserved space on or near your desired day.

Date (2019-2020) Holiday Tradition

Aug. 10

*Eid al Adha

(begins at sundown)

Islamic

Aug. 11

*Eid al Adha

(ends at sundown)

Islamic

 Aug. 15 **The Assumption of the Blessed Virgin Mary  Catholic
 Sept. 9

Ashura

(begins at sundown)

Islamic
 Sept. 10

Ashura

(ends at sundown)

Islamic

Sept. 29

*Rosh Hashanah

(begins at sundown)

Jewish

Oct. 1

*Rosh Hashanah

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

Oct. 8

*Yom Kippur

(begins at sundown)

Jewish

Oct. 9

*Yom Kippur

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

Oct. 13

*Sukkot

(begins at sundown)

Jewish

Oct. 20

*Sukkot

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

Oct. 20

*Shemini Atzeret

(begins at sundown)

Jewish

Oct. 22

*Shemini Atzeret

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

 Oct. 28

*Birth of the Báb

(begins at sundown)

 Baha'i
 Oct. 29  *Birth of the Báb           

(ends at sundown)

 Baha'i

Nov. 1

**All Saints Day

Catholic

Nov. 2

All Souls Day

Catholic

 Dec. 8 **Feast of the Immaculate Conception Catholic
Dec. 22  *Hanukkah

(begins at sundown)

 Jewish

Dec. 25

**Christmas

Christian

Dec. 26

Kwanzaa

(begins at sundown)

Interfaith African-American

 Dec. 30   *Hanukkah

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

Jan. 1

Kwanzaa

(ends at sundown)

Interfaith African-American

 Jan. 25 Chinese New Year Confucian/Daoist/Buddhist

Feb. 9

*Tu BiShvat

(begins at sundown)

Jewish

Feb. 10

*Tu BiShvat

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

Mar. 9

*Purim

(begins at sundown)

Jewish

Mar. 10

*Purim

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

Apr. 5

Palm Sunday

Christian

Apr. 9

Holy Thursday

Christian

Apr. 10

Good Friday

Christian

Apr. 8

*Pesach (Passover)

(begins at sundown)

Jewish

Apr. 12

**Easter Sunday

Christian

Apr. 16

*Pesach (Passover)

(ends at sundown)

Jewish

Apr. 23

 Ramadan

(begins at sundown; ends May 23)

Islamic

May 22

*Declaration of the Báb

(begins at sundown)

Baha’i

 May 23

Ramadan

(ends at sundown)

Islamic

May 23

*Declaration of the Báb

(ends at sundown)

Baha’i

 May 23

*Eid al-Fitr

(begins at sundown)

Islamic
 May 24

*Eid al-Fitr

(ends at sundown)

Islamic

May 27

*Ascension of Baha'u'llah

(begins at Sundown)

Baha'i

May 28

*Ascension of Baha'u'llah

(ends at sundown)

Baha'i

 May 28  *Shavuot

(begins at sundown)

 Jewish
May 30

 *Shavuot

(ends at sundown)

 Jewish

Please note:

  • Holidays indicated in bold with an asterisk (*) require abstinence from all secular activity; i.e., homework, exams, field trips, class meetings, etc. While the other religious holidays may not necessarily require abstinence from all secular activity, some of them may involve fasting, a dietary change, or special celebrations that may occur during the day or the evening.
  • Holidays indicated with a double asterisk (**) are Holy Days of Obligation for Catholics. In addition, all Sundays are Holy Days of Obligation. When the solemn feasts of Mary, the Mother of God (Jan. 1), the Assumption of the Blessed Virgin (Aug. 15), and All Saints (Nov. 1) fall on a Saturday or Monday, the obligation to attend Mass is abolished. Although the obligation to attend Holy Mass is abolished, parishes continue to observe these holy days by scheduling one or more masses at a convenient time so that those who wish to participate are able to do so.
  • In the Jewish tradition, all work-related activities stop from sundown on Friday to sundown on Saturday to observe Shabbat (Sabbath).
  • Islamic dates are approximate. The official days can be plus/minus one day and depend upon the official physical sighting of the new moon.
  • According to the Eastern Orthodox Church calendar, the day begins after evening vespers at sunset and concludes with vespers on the following day. For this reason, the observance of all Eastern Orthodox holy days begins at sunset on the evening before the holy day.