Loyola University Maryland

Public Safety

VAWA Ongoing Prevention and Awareness Campaigns

Educational programs to prevent and to promote the awareness of rape, acquaintance rape, domestic violence, dating violence, sexual assault, and stalking are offered during Summer Orientation, Fall Welcome Week for new students, in new employee orientation, in residence hall floor meetings, and on campus throughout the academic year. Such prevention and awareness programs include a statement that the University prohibits all forms of sexual misconduct, provides definitions of the various types of prohibited sexual misconduct as well as the definition and meaning of consent, safe and positive options for bystander intervention, and information on risk reduction to recognize warning signs of abusive behavior and how to avoid potential attacks. Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking means comprehensive, intentional, and integrated programming, initiatives, strategies, and campaigns intended to end dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking that—

(A) Are culturally relevant, inclusive of diverse communities and identities, sustainable, responsive to community needs, and informed by research or assessed for value, effectiveness, or outcome; and

(B) Consider environmental risk and protective factors as they occur on the individual, relationship, institutional, community, and societal levels.

Programs to prevent dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault, and stalking include both primary prevention and awareness programs directed at incoming students and new employees and ongoing prevention and awareness campaigns directed at students and employees.

Subject Codes:

RRSA

Risk Reduction and Safety Awareness

ST

Stalking

DV

Domestic Violence

DAV

Dating Violence

BI

Bystander Intervention

CON

Consent

SA

Sexual Assault

 

 

Primary Prevention and Awareness Programs for 1st Year Students

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Prohibited Behavior Covered

Realities of College Life

Day 2 of Summer Orientation 2018

McManus Theater

SA

Campus Safety for incoming International Students

9/01/2018

Sellinger Hall

SA/DAV/ST/RRSA

Know More: Building a community of consent (undergrads and transfer students)

8/31/2018

Reitz Arena

CON/SA/DAV/ST/RRSA

Preventing Discrimination and Sexual Violence for new graduate students

Fall semester

Online

SA/DV/DAV/ST/RRSA

Know More: Building a community of consent for international students

 8/31/2018 Humanities Center  CON/SA/DAV/ST/RRSA

Step Up! For 1st year students

Fall semester

Messina Class

BI

Primary Prevention and Awareness Programs for New Employees

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Prohibited Behavior Covered

Employee Orientation

Quarterly

5000 York Road

SA/DAV/ST/RRSA

Preventing Discrimination and Sexual Violence: Title IX, VAWA and Clery Act for Administrators

Ongoing

Online

SA/DAV/ST/DV

Title IX Responsible Employee

Ongoing

Online

SA/ST/DV/DAV/CON

Workplace Violence and Title IX/Harassment Prevention Training

9/27/2018

McGuire West

RRSA

Sexual Harassment

January, May, August and November

McGuire Hall

RRSA

Ongoing Awareness and Prevention Programs for Students

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Topics Covered

Safety (relational violence is covered as well as psychological well-being in general)

Fall Orientation 9/01/2018

Student Center

DAV/DV

Graduate Student Orientation

Prior to each Semester

E-mail

SA/DV/DAV/ST

Dissolving Rape Myths

10/25/2018

Library Auditorium

SA

Escalation

Throughout Fall semester 2018

Various locations

DV/DAV

#RelationshipGoals

2/08/2018

Campion Lounge

DV/DAV

PAUSE

3/26/2018

Campion Lounge

SA

Consent and Cookies

4/17/2018

Residence Hall

CON/SA

Ongoing Awareness and Prevention Programs for Employees

Name of Program

Date of Program

Location

Topics Covered

Responsible Employee Training:

Ongoing

Online

SA/DAV/DV/ST

Campus Security Authority

Annually

Online

SA/DV/DAV

Overview of Education Programs:

Throughout every year, various Loyola departments offer numerous programs on sexual assault prevention and awareness open to all members of the Loyola community. Every year during the month of April, the Women’s Center, Health Center, DPS, and members of the student government co-sponsor Sexual Assault Awareness Month. Programs on sexual assault prevention and awareness are conducted throughout the month.  Numerous programs on safety awareness and crime prevention are offered annually for students and employees.

Consent and Cookies: Residents learn about consent and sexual assault through a TED talk and game. Resources distributed along with rape whistles from the Women's Center. Melissa Lees provided statistics relevant to Loyola.

PAUSE: Residents discussed sexual assault prevention.

#RelationshipGoals: Women's center presented signs of healthy relationships and signs of domestic abuse. Melissa Lees was kind enough to teach our residents how to recognize domestic abuse and what characteristics are desired for a healthy relationship to thrive.

Title IX Responsible Employee Training: A “responsible employee” has the duty to report harassment or other types of misconduct, is someone a student could reasonably believe has this authority or responsibility to react to reported sexual harassment and/or misconduct and could be any Loyola community member including faculty, administrators, staff, GAs, RAs, coaches, and trainers, in other words, this is YOU. As such, the University is obligated to ensure that you are trained regarding your obligation to report sexual harassment/assault/ or misconduct.  Title IX responsible employee is a one hour online course all employees of the Loyola community is required to take annually.

Preventing Discrimination and Sexual Violence: online course was fully implemented for all new graduate students as of the fall 2018 semester. 

Escalation Workshop: Escalation is a powerful, emotionally engaging 90-minute film based workshop that educates the community about relationship violence and empowers individuals to work for change, presented to Men’s Lacrosse, Men’s and Women’s Tennis, Open to all, Men’s Soccer, Women’s Soccer.

Sexual Assault Awareness Week: April 9-13 A week of programs designed to bring awareness to issues of sexual assault, domestic violence, dating violence, and stalking.

Dissolving Rape Myths: As a part of Consent Week, this panel will be a discussion of survivor stories, and will have the coordinating director of OneLove as a guest speaker.

Bystander and Risk Reduction information

Bystander Intervention

Bystander intervention means safe and positive options that may be carried out by an individual or individuals to prevent harm or intervene when there is a risk of dating violence, domestic violence, sexual assault or stalking. Bystander intervention includes recognizing situations of potential harm, understanding institutional structures and cultural conditions that facilitate violence, overcoming barriers to intervening, identifying safe and effective intervention options, and taking action to intervene.

Loyola University Maryland strives to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm.  We may not always know what to do, even if we want to help. Listed below are some ways to be an active bystander. If you or someone is in immediate danger, dial 911. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.

Bystanders play a critical role in the prevention of sexual and relationship violence. Bystanders are “individuals who observe violence or witness the conditions that perpetuate violence. Bystanders are not directly involved but have the choice to intervene, speak up, or do something about it.” Loyola University Maryland strives to promote a culture of community accountability where bystanders are actively engaged in the prevention of violence without causing further harm. We may not always know what to do, even if we want to help. Listed below are some ways to be an active bystander. If you or someone is in immediate danger, dial 911. This could be when a person is yelling at or being physically abusive towards another and it is not safe for you to interrupt.

  • Watch out for your friends and fellow students/employees. If you see someone who looks like they could be in trouble or need help, ask if they are okay.
  • Confront people who seclude, hit on, and try to make out with, or have sex with people who are incapacitated.
  • Speak up when someone discusses plans to take sexual advantage of another person.
  • Believe someone who discloses sexual assault, abusive behavior, or experience with stalking.
  • Refer people to on or off campus resources listed in this document for support in health, counseling, or with legal assistance.
  • Watch out for your friends and vice versa. If a friend seems out of it, is way too intoxicated for the amount of alcohol they’ve had, or is acting out of character, get her or him toa safe place immediately.
  • If you suspect you or a friend has been drugged, contact local law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.). Be explicit with doctors so they can give you the correct tests (you will need a urine test and possibly others).

Risk Reduction awareness

With no intent to victim blame and recognizing that only abusers are responsible for their abuse, the following are some strategies to reduce one’s risk of sexual assault or harassment taken from Rape, Abuse, & Incest National Network, www.rainn.org)

  • Be aware of your surroundings. Knowing where you are and who is around you, may help you to find a way to get out of a bad situation.
  • Try to avoid isolated areas. It is more difficult to get help if no one around.
  • Walk with purpose. Even if you don’t know where you are going, act like you do.
  • Try not to load yourself down with packages or bags as this can make you appear more vulnerable.
  • Make sure your cell phone is with you and charged and that you have cab money. Loyola DPS recommends establishing an Uber or Lyft account. Links to both organizations can be found on the Loyola transportation and parking webpage.
  • Don’t allow yourself to be isolated with someone you don’t trust or someone you don’t know.
  • Avoid putting music headphones in both ears so that you can be more aware of surroundings, especially if you are walking alone.
  • When you go to a social gathering, go with a group of friends. Arrive together, check in with each other throughout the evening, and leave together.
  • Trust your instincts. If you feel unsafe in any situation, go with your gut. If you see something suspicious, contact law enforcement immediately (local authorities can be reached by calling 911 in most areas of the U.S.).
  • Don’t leave your drink unattended while talking, dancing, using the restroom, or making a phone call. If you’ve left your drink, just get a new one.
  • Don’t accept drinks from people you don’t know or trust. If you choose to accept a drink, go with the person to the bar to order it, watch it being poured, and carry it yourself. At parties, don’t drink from punch bowls or other large common containers.
  • If you need to get out of an uncomfortable or scary situation here are some things that you can try:
    • Remember that being in this situation in not your fault. You did not do anything wrong, it is the person who is making you uncomfortable that is to blame.
    • Be true to yourself. Don’t feel obligated to do anything you don’t want to do. “I don’t want to” is always a good enough reason. Do what feels right to you and what you are comfortable with.
    • Have a code word with your friends or family so that if you don’t feel comfortable you can call them and communicate your discomfort without the person you are with knowing. Your friends and family can then come to get you or make up an excuse for you to leave.
    • Lie. If you don’t want to hurt the person’s feelings it is better to lie and make up a reason to leave than to stay and be uncomfortable, scared or worse. Some excuses you could use are: needing to take care of a friend or family member, not feeling well, having somewhere else that you need to be, etc.
    • Try to think of an escape route. How would you try to get out of a room? Where are the doors and windows?Are there people around who might be able to help you? Is there an emergency phone nearby?
    • If you and/or the other person have been drinking, you can say that you would rather wait until you both have your full judgement before doing anything you may regret later.
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