Loyola University Maryland

Parents Newsletter

News You Can Use

Student Health and Education Services:

Meet Stephanie Regenold, M.D., MPH – the new director of Loyola’s Student Health and Education Services. Regneold worked at the Baltimore City Health Department doing population-level health care and promotion for 10 years. Before the Health Department, she worked as a clinician at the Johns Hopkins University Student Health and Wellness Center for 10 years.

Regenold is a first-generation American born and raised in Baltimore. Throughout her life she has studied and worked in Montreal, London, and Portland before making her way back to Baltimore. We asked Regenold a few questions about her new position and keeping students healthy.

What’s your favorite part of Loyola?

Regenold: Loyola has been such a warm, welcoming place. The staff and administrators I work with are thoughtful, caring people and I am really impressed with the dedication and quality of care that the health center staff provides. I am happy to be a part of it all.

Tell us about some of the services the Health Center offers.

Regenold: In addition to acute and urgent care problems from head to toe, we have an allergy clinic, provide immunizations, and draw blood. We also have a small pharmacy, refer for specialty care, and do study abroad/internship clearance exams.

What are some things parents should keep in mind if their student is sick and away from home?

Regenold: Our health center is open during the academic year from Monday to Friday during business hours. After business hours, we have coverage from a physician on-call team. Your students have access 24/7 to a health care professional. Aside from Health Center services, encourage your student to have a healthy diet, regular exercise, consistent and adequate sleep, and time to relax. Also, make sure your student got a flu shot and is handwashing. As a parent of college students, I understand both personally and professionally how stressful it can feel to have your child sick and away at school. My goal is for your child to have a healthy and safe experience here at Loyola.

For more information, go to the Student Health and Education Service website.

Developmental transitions:

First-year Students:

First-year students are still acclimating to Loyola and are often examining their personal relationships. They may have developed relationships with people in close proximity to them, but they may also crave deeper connections and more ways to get involved in the Loyola community. Students often wrongly assume that once the first semester is over, they can’t join any clubs or organizations. If your student hasn’t found a strong connection to Loyola yet, getting involved in something meaningful is a wonderful way to foster that connection. It’s also not too late to join a club or organization or attend an on-campus event. About 30% of incoming first-year students request a roommate, so the housing selection process is the first opportunity for most of them to make decisions about their roommates and who they want to share their space. Some will form roommate groups easily, and others may have more difficulty. It is a myth that all first-year students easily and quickly form roommate groups. All upperclass students live in suites, apartments, or townhomes, so first-year students who live in doubles need to consider how they want to navigate a new space with more roommates. Many first-year students are still determining their major and exploring their academic interests. Again, they wrongly assume that everyone else “has it all figured out.”

To-dos for first-year students:

  • Talk to their Messina mentor about ways to get involved on campus
  • Participate in or attend one of the many Loyola spring traditions – Humanities Symposium, Relay for Life, Black Student Association Fashion Show, Academic Excellence Weekend, Loyolapalooza
  • Talk with potential roommates about what they value in a living situation. Some topics include cleanliness, guests, noise, sleeping schedules, etc. (Many Messina classes will have done a housing values exercise with the students to help them prep for this conversation)
  • Attend the academic major exploration program on Friday, April 6, from 1-4 p.m. in McGuire

Sophomores:

Sophomores have to make a number of “big decisions,” and many may be grappling with the outcomes of those decisions. If they applied to study abroad, they know their placement and have to complete the next steps in the pre-departure process. They have declared their major but may still have questions about how it connects to their future vocation. In terms of housing selection, sophomores may be trying to navigate their own study abroad plans and/or the study abroad plans of roommates.

To-dos for Sophomores-

  • Visit the Career Center for a resume critique, counseling and coaching, or attend one of their many events
  • Learn more about the National Fellowships Office and how to apply for competitive fellowships, scholarships, summer programs, and awards
  • Students who are going abroad should continue to work with International Programs to prepare for the abroad experience and complete all paperwork
  • Talk with potential roommates about what they value in a living situation. Some topics include cleanliness, guests, noise, sleeping schedules, etc. Sophomores should discuss study abroad plans and understand what each group member plans to do for the upcoming year.

Juniors:

Approximately 60% of Loyola juniors go abroad, so most juniors are navigating relationships with friends that they may not see for half of or their entire junior year. Those who went abroad in the fall often face a number of re-entry adjustments as they reflect on their experience and resume daily life on campus. Those going abroad in the spring  are often managing housing selection or securing internships from a distance.

To-dos for Juniors:

  • Visit the Career Center for a resume critique, counseling and coaching, guidance for applying to internships, or attend one of their many events
  • Learn more about the National Fellowships Office and how to apply for competitive fellowships, scholarships, summer programs, and awards
  • Review their degree audit to make sure they are on track for graduation
  • Talk with potential roommates about what they value in a living situation. Some topics include cleanliness, guests, noise, sleeping schedules, etc.

Seniors:

Seniors are often torn between conflicting emotions – excitement that their college career is almost over and disbelief that the time has gone so quickly. Some are eager to talk about next steps while others are uncomfortable acknowledging that their time at Loyola is almost over. Some seniors wrongly assume that everyone has already found a job or been accepted to graduate school. It’s not too late for seniors to engage the Career Center for support in the job search process. A number of seniors are asking faculty and mentors to write recommendation letters. Students can aid this process by confirming that those who are writing the letters can provide a positive review of their work and by providing a brief list of accomplishments or highlights (even a resume).

To-dos for Seniors:

  • Start taking items home for Spring Break and Easter Break. Commencement and residence hall closing are the same day. Taking unneeded items home ahead of time will make the day much smoother for everyone.
  • Check out the Senior Bucket List provided by Student Engagement:

The Career Center:

What's Next: The Liberal Arts Career Fair on Wed., March 14

This Career Fair is geared towards liberal arts students and is open to all majors in all years. Students will engage with a variety of employers, learn more about their companies, as well as explore full-time, part-time, and internship opportunities.