About

“Loyola,” the surname of St. Ignatius, founder of the Jesuits, carries deep meaning and history at Jesuit schools and universities across the country and around the world. Loyola College in Maryland was the first institution in the United States to bear the name Loyola, and over the course of more than 150 years, the name Loyola College came to represent a rich and wonderful history of educational excellence, enduring values, and commitment to the Jesuit tradition of the liberal arts. While the University has assumed a designation that more clearly captures the nature of its programs, the “Loyola College” name lives on in the University’s school of arts and sciences, the cornerstone of the Jesuit approach to education.

Mission, Vision and Values of Loyola University Maryland

Loyola University Maryland is a Jesuit, Catholic university committed to the educational and spiritual traditions of the Society of Jesus and the development of the whole person. Accordingly, the University inspires students to learn, lead, and serve in a diverse and changing world. 

At Loyola, this means that the curriculum is rigorous and faculty expectations are high. In addition to academic coursework, the Jesuit mission is carried out through a variety of programs and events sponsored by various University departments, including Campus Ministry and the Center for Community Service and Justice. Loyola aims to lead students, faculty, staff, alumni, and friends forward to pursue an examined life of intellectual, social, and spiritual discernment. In pursuing these goals, Loyola asserts a bold vision: that Loyola University Maryland will be the nation's leading Catholic, comprehensive university. The standards by which we measure that achievement include the enrollment of outstanding students; the creation of a diverse and supportive community; the cultivation of a rigorous intellectual climate which distinctly prepares graduates to succeed in any endeavor they choose to pursue; the scholarly achievements of the faculty; the recognition of academic peers; the intellectual and professional attainments and generosity of spirit of the alumni.

Learn more about Loyola's mission, vision and values.

Graduate Learning Goals

The graduate learning goals are intended to provide a framework within which different graduate programs will develop discipline-specific goals. These goals embrace the core values and principles inherent in the mission of the University. Read more about the graduate learning goals.

Dean's Office

Rev. James J. Miracky, S.J., dean of Arts and Sciences is the principal executive officer of the College of Arts and Sciences. He provides vision and administrative and academic leadership required to fulfill the mission of the school; supports the faculty in achieving standards of excellence in teaching, curriculum development, scholarly growth and intellectual contributions, and service to the community; promotes efforts to increase diversity in the student body, staff, and faculty; and fosters the Jesuit, Catholic mission of the University. 

Staff

Learn more about the College of Arts and Sciences staff.

Board of Advisors

Learn about the Board of Advisors.

Loyola News

Loyola News
  1. Sellinger School rises in Businessweek's "Best Undergraduate Business Schools" rankings

    Mon, 07 Apr 2014 15:56:48 -0400http://www.loyola.edu/news/2014/0407-sellinger-businessweek-ranking
  2. Gordon Erberts, ’49, gives Loyola $1.5 million to support mission and ministry

    Loyola University Maryland will benefit from a $1.5 million planned gift from Gordon Erberts, ’49, to support programs and initiatives in Campus Ministry and the office of mission integration.

    Erberts, of Toluca Lake, Calif., was inspired to make the gift after reflecting on his experience at Loyola and the rigorous Jesuit education that prepared him for success.

    “Loyola did something for me, and I want to do something for them,” said Erberts. “The Jesuits are darn good teachers. They did a good job with me, and I want to pass that on to today’s young people to give them a head start on life.”

    His gift benefits multiple initiatives focused on mission and ministry, primarily through four endowed funds. Loyola will create the Erberts Campus Ministry Endowed Fund to support the programmatic needs of Campus Ministry and the Erberts Assistance Fund for Student Retreats to provide grants to students who require financial assistance to attend campus-sponsored retreats. In addition, Loyola will create the Erberts Ignatian Retreat Endowment Fund to support the Ignatian retreat program for Loyola faculty, staff, and administrators. Finally, Loyola will create the Erberts Pilgrimage Endowed Fund, which will support programs that promote the Catholic and Jesuit activities and mission of Loyola.

    The remaining dollars will be allocated equally among faculty development initiatives, student integration efforts, and related publication expenses.

    “Exceptional students from all over the world choose Loyola because of our commitment to the quality and value of a challenging Jesuit education,” said Rev. Brian F. Linnane, S.J., Loyola’s president. “Mr. Erberts recognizes that commitment, and his tremendous generosity will provide enriching opportunities for members of our community to strengthen their connections to one another and our mission to serve others.”

    Erberts was a chemistry and modern biology major at Loyola and commuted to campus from his home in Baltimore’s Ten Hills neighborhood. He began his career in flooring sales before switching to selling mutual funds. He moved to California in 1960 and continued in the mutual fund business until his retirement.

    Erberts’ gift supports Loyola’s ongoing Bright Minds, Bold Hearts comprehensive campaign to raise $100 million to grow Loyola’s endowment, scholarship funds, and faculty positions, and grow Messina, Loyola’s living learning program for first-year students.

    Read more about Gordon Erberts in Loyola magazine.

    Thu, 03 Apr 2014 16:48:10 -0400http://www.loyola.edu/news/2014/0403-gordon-erberts-gift
  3. Seán Bray named director of campus ministry

    After completing a two-year national search, Loyola University Maryland has selected educator and career youth and young adult minister Seán Bray to serve as director of campus ministry. Bray is currently the campus minister for social justice at Seattle University, a fellow Jesuit institution.

    “I am deeply honored and very excited to become the director of campus ministry at Loyola,” said Bray. “The Loyola community has made it easy for me to imagine myself on campus. I look forward to collaborating with the students, staff, faculty, alumni, and community partners to continue and build upon the meaningful work of campus ministry to promote spiritual engagement, build community, and form students to be men and women for others.”

    Since 2007, Bray has coordinated social justice programs, advocacy opportunities, and local service experiences at Seattle University. He supervises 23 student leaders and the faculty/staff immersion chaplains, and he oversees curriculum, budget, fundraising, staffing, and programming for immersion programs. Additionally, Bray was a campus minister for retreats at Seattle University, promoted Catholic Relief Services’ Food Fast curriculum and Fair Trade programs at the Archdiocesan of Seattle Missions Office, and was the co-director of outdoor ministries for Catholic Youth Organization. Earlier in his career, Bray taught middle school at the Sacred Heart School in Bellevue, Wash., and was the pastoral assistant for youth ministry in the Sacred Heart Parish.

    Bray earned a B.A. in Elementary Education from Carroll College in Helena, Mont., and a Master of Arts in Pastoral Studies from Seattle University. His service experience includes work in Seattle, Montana, Colombia, India, Thailand, Guatemala, and the Dominican Republic.

    Rev. Timothy Brown, S.J., has served as the interim director of campus ministry for the last two years following the departure of Rev. Jack Dennis, S.J., who left Loyola in 2012 to become president of Brebeuf Jesuit Preparatory School in Indianapolis, Ind. Fr. Brown will continue his role as special assistant for mission integration and associate professor of law and social responsibility.

    Bray will assume his new role at Loyola on July 1, 2014.

    Loyola marketing and communications intern Ariel Genovese, '14, was the primary author of this story.

    Fri, 28 Mar 2014 15:13:00 -0400http://www.loyola.edu/news/2014/0328-sean-bray-campus-ministry-director
  4. Loyola ranks in top 7% of U.S. universities for return on investment

    Loyola University Maryland is ranked in the top 7 percent of more than 1,300 U.S. colleges and universities for return on investment in PayScale.com's 2014 College ROI Report. With financial aid included, Loyola is in the top 6 percent.

    PayScale is an online compensation database that has released a college ROI report annually for the last several years. Loyola's overall ranking for 2014 is based on the net income a graduate will earn 20 years after graduation after subtracting both what they would have earned as a high school graduate and the cost of college. Based on that formula, PayScale found the 20-year ROI for a Loyola graduate to be just under $500,000; the ROI for the top 1 percent of schools starts at just under $700,000.

    "With numerous examples of alumni who are achieving professional success and contributing in positive ways throughout the world, we don't need rankings to know that a Loyola University Maryland education is worth the investment," said Rev. Brian F. Linnane, S.J., Loyola's president. "However, external acknowledgment is particularly welcome for our students and their families who not only believe in the value of a Loyola education, but are also making the sacrifices with confidence that the investment is—and will be—worth it."

    Loyola also ranked No. 49 of nearly 500 private not-for-profit universities on PayScale’s list and in the top 10 percent for business majors. Loyola's ROI is No. 3 among all Maryland schools and No. 2 when the average amount of financial aid awarded to students is considered. In addition, Loyola is in the top 3 percent of PayScale's "Best Religious Schools" for ROI and top 8 percent for "Best Schools for Sports Fans."

    PayScale generated the rankings using data collected from employees who successfully completed a PayScale survey. Only graduates who are employed full-time and paid with either an hourly wage or an annual salary were included in the report. Also, only employees who possess a bachelor's degree and no higher degrees were included.

    Loyola moved up in PayScale's rankings compared to last year, from No. 157 to No. 83 overall. Loyola’s full profile for 2014 is available at payscale.com.

    Thu, 27 Mar 2014 14:26:02 -0400http://www.loyola.edu/news/2014/0327-payscale-roi-report-2014
  1. Messina Self and Other Theme-Wide Event

    McGuire West,McGuire Atrium West
    Monday, April 7, 2014, 7 – 8:30pm

    Messina and Take Back the Night welcomes Sharon, mother of Yeardley Love, a University of Virginia student who was beaten to death in 2010 by her boyfriend. She will share how relationship violence impacted her life with the loss of Yeardley and why it's important for all of us to have conversations with our family and friends about healthy relationships. We will also learn about how the Love family has kept Yeardley's memory alive through the One Love Foundation. The "One" represents the number Yeardley wore on her jersey during her high school and college lacrosse career. The number has since been retired by the University of Virginia in her memory. A dessert reception will follow the event.


    07 Apr 2014 23:00:00 GMThttp://www.loyola.edu/events.aspx?trumbaEmbed=view%3devent%26eventid%3d116793697
  2. Miss America 2014 - Nina Davuluri

    McGuire West
    Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7 – 9pm

    To celebrate APIA month, Asian Cultural Alliance invites you to listen to our keynote speaker, Nina Davuluri. She was crowned Miss America 2014 and is the first Indian American and second Asian American to win this prestigious title. She is also the first contestant to perform a Bollywood dance at the competition.

    As part of Miss Davuluri's platform, "Celebrating Diversity through Cultural Competency," she will be speaking about the importance of inclusion and diversity, among other topics. After her lecture, there will be a question and answer session.

    Tickets are free, but required for this event, as there are a limited amount of seats. Reserve your ticket at www.loyola.edu/alana.

    All are welcome.

    Questions? Ask us at aca@loyola.edu or ALANA@loyola.edu.




    08 Apr 2014 23:00:00 GMThttp://www.loyola.edu/events.aspx?trumbaEmbed=view%3devent%26eventid%3d117164877
  3. How to Love a Survivor

    Hopkins Lounge
    Tuesday, April 8, 2014, 7:30 – 9pm

    Members of the Loyola community will share how their lives were impacted by sexual assault and what it is like to love a survivor. Following their stories, the event will open into a discussion so that Loyola can learn how to support everyone affected by sexual assault. This event is part of Sexual Assault Awareness Week and is sponsored by the Take Back the Night Student Organization.




    08 Apr 2014 23:30:00 GMThttp://www.loyola.edu/events.aspx?trumbaEmbed=view%3devent%26eventid%3d118426616
  4. Brown Bag Discussion: Digital Humanities

    Library 3028 - Board Room
    Wednesday, April 9, 2014, 12:15 – 1:15pm

    Come to the third session of the library's Digital Humanities Brown Bag series to learn about new trends and projects in this exciting new area of research and teaching.

    The library will provide coffee and donuts. For more information about the Digital Humanities Brown Bag series, visit http://lndlnews.blogspot.com/2014/02/digital-humanities-brown-bag-discussions.html


    09 Apr 2014 16:15:00 GMThttp://www.loyola.edu/events.aspx?trumbaEmbed=view%3devent%26eventid%3d115894850

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