School of Education Blog

News & Highlights

This One Time at Ed Camp...

Some EdCamp Loyola participants pose for a group photo

David Dutrow, a student in the Howard County Cohort of Loyola University Maryland's Educational Technology Graduate Program reflects on his involvement and excitement during our recent EdCamp event on our Timonium Campus in October.

What Is Curriculum and Instruction: A Reflection

Dr. Stephanie Flores-Koulish, Associate Professor and Director of the Curriculum and Instruction program at Loyola University Maryland reflects on Curriculum and Instruction as a program and why it's not only an important program for teachers, but how it as a program supports the core values of the University as whole.

How to Become a Teacher

Have you always wanted to work with young children? Perhaps you’ve seen the difference a teacher can make in the life of a student and you want to make an impact? Maybe your current career is just not satisfying and you feel called to teach? These are just a few reasons people often cite for why they returned to school to become an elementary or secondary teacher. If you’ve made the decision that this is the career path for you, you are probably wondering: How do I become a teacher?

How to Become a School Counselor

School counselors play a vital role in today’s dynamic school systems. Perhaps more than ever, students from pre-kindergarten through high school face any number of stressors in school, at home, and in the community. As a certified Maryland school counselor, you have the chance to help students navigate the complex waters of early childhood and adolescence so they can make the most of their education.

Why I Became a Teacher

Peg Prentice

Peg Prentice began her career as a molecular cell biologist at the National Institutes of Health Cancer Institute. Today the 53-year-old Montgomery County resident is a science teacher at The Catholic High School of Baltimore and coordinator for its biomedical program. Her road from lab to classroom began 15 years ago when she noticed educational disparity in her government work.