Loyola University Maryland

Accomplished Greyhounds

Attainments 2012-13

image divider

Loyola celebrates the attainments of its faculty members who were recently promoted and tenured.

During the 2012-13 academic year, two Loyola faculty members were promoted and nine were tenured and promoted. Their accomplishments will continue to strengthen student learning experiences, and their scholarly contributions will continue to enrich human and universal understanding and experience.

The profiles of these distinguished faculty members, which follow, describe the faculty members' areas of expertise and give insight into their most significant and rewarding career dimensions.

BauerschmidtFrederick Bauerschmidt

Promoted

Professor of Theology

Research Interests

Medieval and contemporary Theology, particularly the thought of Thomas Aquinas

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • TH201: Introduction to Theology
  • HN202: Honors: The Medieval World
  • TH338: The Theology of Thomas Aquinas

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Thomas Aquinas: Faith, Reason and Following Christ (Oxford, 2013)
  • “Augustine and Thomas” In The T&T Clark Companion to Augustine and Modern Theology, Chad Pecknold and Tarmo Toom, eds. Edinburgh: T&T Clark (2013).
  • “‘All Things Counter, Original, Spare, Strange’: Liberal Society and Pluralism.” Communio 40 (2013), 1-17.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Chair, Department of Theology (2009-present)
  • Deacon, Archdiocese of Baltimore (ordained 2007)

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

One of my favorite courses to teach in Introduction to Theology because this is a course that everyone in the Theology department teaches and it therefore forms the basis for much discussion among colleagues regarding the material of the course and how best to teach it. My fellow department members are some of the most intellectually stimulating people I know and I am a better theologian because of them. Many of my scholarly projects grow from discussion with colleagues over the lunch table.

DahlElizabeth Dahl

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Chemistry

Research Interests

The sources of oceanic and atmospheric alkyl nitrates and the impact on tropospheric chemistry

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Global Environment
  • Quantitative Analysis
  • Instrumental Methods

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Liss, P., C. Marandino, E. Dahl, D. Hemig, E.J. Hintsa, C. Hughes, M. Johnson, B. Moore, J. Plane, B. Quack, H. Singh, J. Stefels, R. von Glasgow, J. Williams. Trace gases in the surface ocean and atmosphere, in: Ocean-Atmosphere Interactions of Gases and Particles, ed. P.Liss (2013), Springer Earth System Sciences, 2013.  ISBN 978-3-642-25642-4
  • Dahl, E.E., E.M. Heiss, K. Murawski (2012), The effects of dissolved organic matter on alkyl nitrate production during GOMECC and laboratory studies, Marine Chemistry, 142-144, 11-17, doi: 10.1016/j.marchem.2012.08.001.
  • E.E. Dahl, D.A. Kellogg, C. Escobar.  Are Diatoms a Source of Oceanic Alkyl Nitrates, SOLAS Open Science Conference 2012, Cle Elum WA.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Initiated the Natural and Mathematical Sciences Seminar Series in Spring 2007
  • Undergraduate Research & Scholarship Committee for 5 years – 3 as chair/co-chair

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • “Production of alkyl nitrates by the marine diatom species Thalassiosira weissflogii and Skeletonema costatum,” Research Corporation for Science Advancement, June 2010-June 2013.
  • “RUI: Biological production of oceanic alkyl nitrates,” National Science Foundation, Chemical Oceanography, Project period June 2010-May 2013.
  • “The Incorporation of Graphite-Furnace Atomic Absorption Spectroscopy Across the Chemistry Curriculum” National Science Foundation, Division of Undergraduate Education, Course Curriculum and Laboratory Improvement, Project Period June 2010-May 2013.

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

When I arrived at Loyola in 2006, my primary experiences had been at research universities.  I had little experience with liberal arts and comprehensive universities; however it was important to me that I work someplace where teaching and research were valued.  I have found that at Loyola University Maryland where I am constantly challenged to improve my teaching and increase student learning.  I have established a successful undergraduate research program in marine and atmospheric chemistry.   At Loyola University, I have found service opportunities that match my passions and interests.   I am looking forward to continuing my work at Loyola University for many years to come.

D'SouzaFrank D’Souza

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Finance

Research Interests

  • Corporate Finance
  • Behavioral Finance
  • Derivative Securities
  • Corporate Governance

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • FI.381 – Equity Securities: Valuation and Markets
  • FI.426 – Sellinger Applied Portfolio
  • GB/FI.722 – Investment Analysis – Graduate

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Ellis, N., Fairchild, L., & D’Souza, F. (2012) “Conflicts of Interest in the Credit Rating Industry after Dodd-Frank: Continued Business as Usual?”, Stanford Journal of Law, Business & Finance, 7(1), 1-46
  • Ellis, N., Fairchild, L., & D’Souza, F. (2012) “Is Imposing Liability on Credit Agencies a Good Idea?: Credit Rating Agency Reform in the Aftermath of the Global Financial Crisis”, Virginia Law & Business Review, 17(2), 175-222
  • Carter, D., D’Souza, F., Simkins, B., & Simpson, W.G., (2010), “The Gender and Ethnic Diversity of US Boards and Board Committees and Firm Financial Performance”, Corporate Governance: An International Review, 18(5), 396–414

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Academic standards committee
  • ALANA services
  • Retirement plan oversight committee (Loyola University)

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Loyola University Summer Research Grant (2010)

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The Jesuit identity and the emphasis that is placed on teaching and research is what drew me to Loyola. My research has thrived because of the support I have received in the form of databases, a sabbatical, and research funding. I have also been able to work with a number of accomplished colleagues from within and outside my department. The relatively small class sizes, allow me to engage my students and advise them individually. Opportunities like the SAP class where my students manage part of the University’s endowment have helped me grow significantly as a teacher.

HersiAfra Hersi

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Teacher Education

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Youth and Adolescent Literacy
  • Content Area Literacy
  • Teacher Research and Inquiry

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Hersi, A. A. & Watkinson, J.S (2012). Supporting immigrant students in a newcomer  high school: A case study. Bilingual Research Journal, 35, 98-111
  • Hersi, A. A. (2011). Immigration and resiliency: Unpacking the experiences of high school students from Cape Verde and Ethiopia. Journal of Intercultural Education, 23 (2).
  • Skerrett, A., & Hersi, A. A.  (2011). Culturally responsive literacy instruction, in R. M. Bean and A. S. Dagen (eds.), Best Practices of Literacy Leaders: Keys to School Improvement, Guilford Press. 

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Director, Literacy Graduate Program
  • Academic Senate
  • Academic Standards Committee

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Hoen Faculty Research Grant “Literacy Co-teaching and Collaboration in Culturally and Linguistically Diverse Context”, Summer 2012
  • Sabbatical “Reading Specialist, English as Second Language Teacher, and Classroom Teachers: Negotiating Roles and Responsibilities in Culturally and Linguistically Complex School Contexts”, Fall 2011
  • Kolvenbach Fellow, 2009

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

For me, the most rewarding aspect of teaching at Loyola is its commitment to the Jesuit ideals of justice and cura personalis. My interests in social justice have been shaped by the Jesuit value of justice, a commitment to foster the development of the whole person, and a desire to make a difference in the world. At Loyola, issues of justice in education can made more explicit. As I work with my students, I able to assist them to reflect and develop a disposition towards justice and recognize their potential as change agents.

HigginsonChristopher Higginson

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Psychology

Research Interests

My research interests are the cognitive deficits associated with Parkinson’s disease, and the degree to which psychological tests of memory and other elements of cognition predict functioning in the real world.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • PY814 Biological Bases of Behavior
  • PY925 Clinical Applications Assessment
  • PY332 Introduction to Human Neuropsychology

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Farley, K. L., Higginson, C. I., Sherman, M. F., & MacDougall, E. (2011). The ecological validity of clinical tests of visuospatial function in community-dwelling older adults. Archives of Clinical Neuropsychology, 18, 110-115. doi:10.1093/arclin/acr069

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Chair, National Academy of Neuropsychology Honors and Awards Committee
  • Member, Graduate Academic Standards Committee
  • Member, Undergraduate Honor Council

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

What I enjoy about my work is the variety of activities in which I engage. In the classroom, I instruct both undergraduate and graduate students. In the lab, I pursue my research interests with students and colleagues. At the Loyola Clinical Centers, I assist doctoral students in their provision of psychological services to underserved members of the community. What is most significant to me about Loyola is the people. The University is composed of individuals who are not only bright, but also caring and generous, a combination of traits that is exceedingly rare in my opinion. 

PapadakisAlison Papadakis

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Psychology

Research Interests

I study what makes certain adolescents susceptible to depression and how those susceptibilities differ across gender, with the goal of determining how we can prevent and treat depression in adolescents.  In particular, I study risks associated with self-regulatory processes, relational aggression (a form of bullying), stress, and coping responses.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • PY 202 Psychopathology
  • PY 815 Psychopathology Seminar
  • PY 833 Research Methods and Data Analysis in Clinical Psychology II

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Papadakis, A. A., & Strauman, T. J.  (2011). Stress, coping, socialization, and goals: A self-regulation perspective on gender and depression in adolescence.  In T. J. Strauman, P. Costanzo, & J. Garber (Eds.), Depression in Adolescent Girls: Science and Prevention (pp. 151-177).  New York: Guilford Press.
  • Jones, N. P., Papadakis, A. A., Hogan, C. M., & Strauman, T. J. (2009).  Over and over again:  Rumination, reflection, and promotion goal failure and their interactive effects on depressive symptoms.  Behaviour Research and Therapy, 47, 254-259.  doi:10.1016/j.brat.2008.12.007
  • Papadakis, A. A., Prince, R. P., Jones, N. P., & Strauman, T. J. (2006).  Self-regulation, rumination, and vulnerability to depression in adolescent girls.  Development and Psychopathology, 18, 815-829. doi:10.1017/S0954579406060408

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Faculty Moderator for the Honor Council
  • Graduate Academic Standards Committee
  • Psychology Undergraduate Program Committee

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Papadakis, A. A. (Spring 2011). Doing Unto Others: Understanding and Preventing Relational Aggression and Bullying among Students in Catholic Schools. Kolvenbach Fellowship Grant, Loyola University Maryland.
  • Papadakis, A. A. (Fall 2008). Depression and the Transition to Adolescence: Risks Associated with Gender, Self-Discrepancy, and Rumination.  Junior Faculty Sabbatical Fellowship Grant.  Loyola College in Maryland.
  • Papadakis, A. A. (Summer 2006). The Emergence of Gender Differences in Depression: Gender Roles and Coping, A Structural Equation Modeling Approach.  Faculty Summer Research Grant. Loyola College in Maryland.

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Members of the Loyola community have a communality of purpose that I believe is a function of the University’s vision and values and the community members’ commitment to them.  Loyola values individuals who construct their purpose around service to others.  I have enjoyed allowing that philosophy to shape me and helping to shape others to do the same.  Loyola is also a special place because of the close relationships between the faculty and students.

RunnelsMichael Runnels

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Law and Social Responsibility

Research Interests

My research interests focus primarily on one subject, New Governance, which is a contemporary approach to reform that encourages dialogue about regulatory principles from the perspectives of industry, corporate social responsibility advocates, and shareholders. The underlying policy priority of New Governance is that corporate governance mechanisms, if they are to be responsive to public expectations of good corporate ethics, must have greater flexibilities built into them, and those flexibilities ought to be animated by goals for outcomes - not processes.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Legal Environment of Business (LW305)
  • Ethics & Social Responsibility (EL700)
  • New Governance (EL708)

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • "Apologies All Around: Advocating Federal Protection for the Full Apology in Civil Cases," (San Diego Law Review)
  • "Cooperative NRDA & New Governance: Getting to Restoration in the Hudson River, the Gulf of Mexico, and Beyond," (with Andrea Giampetro-Meyer) (Brooklyn Law Review)
  • "The Foreign Corrupt Practices Act & New Governance: Incentivizing Ethical Foreign Direct Investment in China and Other Emerging Economies," (with Adam M. Burton) (Cardozo Law Review)

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Business Representative to the Faculty Affairs Committee
  • Chair of Sellinger's Curriculum Committee
  • Co-planner of Loyola's annual Ethics Week

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Junior Faculty Sabbatical awarded in 2008
  • Sellinger Summer Research Grant awarded in 2011

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

While reflecting on my time at Loyola University Maryland, I have realized that my most rewarding experience is being present for students, whether it is writing letter of recommendation, discussing career options, serving as their advisor when they have been accused of violating conduct standards, or participating in events that celebrate their accomplishments. I believe that advising students in a manner that is consistent with Loyola's mission means shepherding them through their failures as well as their accomplishments and assisting them in making ethical decisions. During my past five years at Loyola, it has been rewarding to do both.

ShahMili Shah

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Mathematics and Statistics

Research Interests

My primary field of interest is Numerical Analysis and its application in symmetry problems, computer vision, and robotics.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Numerical Analysis
  • Differential Equations

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • M. Shah, Comparing Two Sets of Corresponding Six Degree of Freedom Data, Computer Vision and Image Understanding, 115 (2011), pp. 1355-1362.
  • M. Shah and D. C. Sorensen, Best Non-Spherical Symmetric Low Rank Approximation, SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications, 31 (2009), pp. 1019-1039.
  • M. Shah and D. C. Sorensen, A Symmetry Preserving Singular Value Decomposition, SIAM Journal on Matrix Analysis and Applications, 28 (2006), pp. 749 - 769.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Organizing the Science Seminar

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • National Institute of Standards and Technology IPA, 2009-2013
  • Loyola University Junior Faculty Sabbatical, 2011
  • Loyola University Maryland Summer Research Grant, 2009

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The most rewarding aspect of my time at Loyola has been the relationships that I have formed with my students. It has been a privilege to get to know them and to help guide them through their years at Loyola University, as well as helping them prepare for life after college. Nothing compares to the feeling of knowing that you are helping a young person shape the course of their life. And of course the most gratifying part of this experience is when they say the two simple words: thank you.

ShinYoon Shin

Promoted

Associate Professor of Finance

Research Interests

  • Fixed Income Securities (corporate bonds and credit ratings)
  • International Finance
  • Japanese Capital Markets
  • Corporate Governance

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • GB/FI825- Special Topic: Entrepreneurial Finance
  • GB/FI726 - International Finance
  • FI380 - Fixed Income Securities: Valuation & Markets

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Unsolicited Versus Solicited: Credit Ratings and Bond Yields,” Co-authored with S. Han, W. Moore, and S. Yi, volume 43 (3), 2013, Journal of Financial Services Research, pp. 293-319
  • “Rating Agency Reputation, the Global Financial Crisis, and the Cost of Debt,” Co-authored with S. Han and M. Pagano, Volume 41 (4), 2012, Financial Management, pp. 849-884
  • "Information Content of Unsolicited Credit Ratings: Evidence from Japanese Firms,” Co-authored with S. Byoun, Volume 42 (1), 2012, Asia-Pacific Journal of Financial Studies, pp. 59-86

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Core Advisor
  • Finance Department Representative for College Day and Learn Loyola
  • Investment Track Chair, Mid-Atlantic Research Conference in Finance (MARC)

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • 2013 Summer Research Grant, “Information Value of Credit Rating Withdrawals,” Loyola University Maryland
  • 2012 Summer Research Grant, “Impact of Regulation on Rating Agency Reputation,” The Sellinger School of Business & Management
  • 2011 Summer Research Grant “Long-Run Performance of Solicited and Unsolicited Credit Ratings,” The Sellinger School of Business & Management

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

I am very grateful to Loyola for Jesuit values it has taught me.  Loyola supported and trained me to be an effective teacher as well as an exemplary scholar.  Loyola also awakened a deeper understanding of social justice in me.  I also transfer Jesuit values to my students.  In particular, since I started my career at Loyola, I have done my best to transform my students into the whole person with character and competence.

SimmonsRobert Simmons

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Teacher Education

Research Interests

My research focuses on urban education and African American males in public and private schools. Currently, I am interested in using Critical Race Theory as the primary framework, to better understand how African American males from urban communities utilize DuBois' understanding of double consciousness and notions of cultural flexibility as suggested by Prudence Carter to navigate predominately White Jesuit high schools.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • First Year Experience 100
  • Education 430 Field Experience: Science
  • Education 600 Foundations of Research

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Simmons, R. (2012). Don't just talk about be about it: The role of narrative and activism as a Critical Race Theorist. PowerPlay: A Journal of Educational Justice, 4(1), 217-224.
  • Simmons, R. (in press). Navigating intraracial and interracial relationships at a Jesuit high school: Using resilience theory and Critical Race Theory to craft a framework for success. Journal of African American Males in Education.
  • Grineski, S., Landsman, J., & Simmons, R. (Eds.) (in press, to be released in April 2013). Talking about race: Alleviating the Fear. Sterling, VA: Stylus Publishing.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Leadership Team, ALANA (African, Latino, Asian andNative American) Services Man to Man Program
  • Mentor, Kolvenbach Fellowship for Undergraduate Students

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Anderson, D., Simmons, R, & Harland, D. (2008). The MIND project's cutting edge health science initiative. Funded project from the National Institutes of Health, (3/20/2006-2/28/2012). Role: Co-Principal Investigator.
  • Kolvenbach Fellow, Loyola University Maryland, Spring 2013

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

Loyola University Maryland has given me an opportunity to expand my research in a variety of ways. While the freedom I have been given to pursue research on urban education and African American males is important, the undergraduate students at Loyola give me a reason to continue my work. As they venture out into the world as teachers, they have the power to significantly impact the negative educational experiences of so many young people. I am honored to do my research at Loyola while also sharing this space with young people who care so deeply about children in our schools.

ThompsonChristopher Thompson

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Biology

Research Interests

I study the innate immune system- our first line of defense against invading pathogens. Specifically, I look at how complementary and alternative medicines alter the immune response.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Cell Biology
  • Microbiology
  • Bioterrorism

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • O. W. Zurek, C. DeFelice, J. E. Jacobi, R. S. Skerrett, K. Brennan, L. Dybas, R. S. Brogan, and C. R. Thompson. Macrophage Cannabinoid Receptor 2 is Necessary for Echinacea-Induced Immunomodulatory Properties. Submitted to Infection and Immunity, January 2013.
  • C.R. Thompson, R.S. Brogan, and D. B. Rivers. Bacterial Interactions with Necrophagous Flies. Annals of the Entomological Society of America. In Review; submitted May 11, 2012.
  • D. J. Kusner , C. R. Thompson, N. Melrose, S. M. Pitson, L. M. Obeid, and S. S. Iyer. 2007. The Localization and Activity of Sphingosine Kinase 1 Are Coordinately Regulated with Actin Cytoskeletal Dynamics in Macrophages. The Journal of Biological Chemistry, 282:23147

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Profession, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Co-organized and lectured in “The Biology Graduate School and Career Information Workshop” (104 students attended; October 2012)
  • Education for Life committee (2011-present; biweekly meetings)
  • Eastern Baltimore Community School and Dr. Rayner Browne Academy- 2nd Grade lectures: “How do animals move?” (22-40 students each year; 2009 - 2011)

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • National Science Foundation- Major Research Instrumentation
  • McNair Mentorship Program Grant

What Is Most Significant or Rewarding About Loyola

The students at Loyola are absolutely wonderful and help to make this university such a fantastic place to work. In the classroom, I have been very impressed by their hard work and determination to attain new levels of knowledge. The research I have conducted in modulation of the innate immune system has benefitted greatly from the 17 undergraduates who have worked in my laboratory performing experiments and analyzing data. I am also constantly impressed by our students’ desire to improve the lives of others through the service opportunities in which they engage all over the world.