Loyola University Maryland

Office of Research and Sponsored Programs

Recent Awards and News

image divider

 

Loyola Education Professor Awarded Fulbright Senior Specialist Program Grant

Bradley Erford, Ph.D., professor of school counseling in the education specialties department at Loyola University Maryland’s School of Education, has been awarded a Fulbright Senior Specialist Program grant. The purpose of the grant is to develop a master’s program in clinical mental health counseling at MEF University in Istanbul, Turkey. Starting in early 2017, Erford will lead a collaborative effort among the MEF faculty and the university’s leadership to create a curriculum and apply for approval from Turkey’s Ministry of National Education. This English-speaking graduate program for clinical mental health counseling discipline will be Turkey’s first program. Also, this will be the first graduate program of any kind at MEF University. MEF plans to admit its first students to the new program in fall 2018.

Assistant Professor of Theatre Awarded Residency at São Paulo Escola de Teatro

Daniel Pinha, Assistant Professor of Theatre at Loyola University Maryland was awarded a residency at the prestigious São Paulo Escola de Teatro—Centro de Formação das Artes do Palco (São Paulo Drama School – Development Center for Stage Arts) in Brazil for the 2017 summer. Pinha will be exploring ways of creating scenic design that are not based on a script but rather on visual elements brought to the performance space. He will be studying how this particular process of creating a dramaturgy is effective and what the benefits are of developing the theatrical design from the visual elements.

 

Camper Awarded Research Grant International Society for the History of Rhetoric

Dr. Martin Camper has been awarded a research grant from the International Society for the History of Rhetoric. The Society, which has members around the world, promotes the study of the theory and practice of rhetoric in all historical periods and languages in a variety of contexts. This award will help support his work on his a second book titled, How the Bible’s Meaning Changes: Argument and Controversy in the Church. The project explores five cases in Christian history since the 16th century where some segment of the church has completely reversed its official stance on a biblical issue. Camper plans to explore how these reversals in biblical meaning were accomplished through argument, building on a rhetorical method for analyzing interpretive controversies detailed in his first book, Arguing over Texts: The Rhetoric of Interpretation, which is due out from Oxford University Press 2017.

 

Loyola Biology Faculty wins $154K Grant from the U.S. Department of Justice

Loyola faculty members of the biology department have won a grant of $154,521 from the U.S. Department of Justice to help create an accurate analysis of critical evidence involved in crime scene investigations by developing a technique for law enforcement to differentiate fly artifacts from human bloodstains. David Rivers, Ph.D., professor of biology and principal investigator, is involved in this two-year project alongside Rebecca Brogan, Ph.D., associate professor of biology, and Andrew Schoeffield, Ph.D., associate professor of biology.

 

Fenner & O’Neill Awarded EiF Grant

Assistant professor of engineering, Raenita Fenner, PhD, and professor of writing, Peggy O’Neill, PhD, have been awarded a grant from the Engineering Information Foundation (EiF). This interdisciplinary project looks to improve instruction of technical writing by integrating technical analysis with quality instruction in writing. 

NSF Funded Scholarship Program for Students

An interdisciplinary group of sciences faculty has been awarded a $565,495 grant from NSF to create a scholarship and mentoring program in which they will recruit and graduate academically talented low-income students pursuing a degree in computer science, physics, mathematics, or statistics. The new C-PaMS Scholars Program will award six students from the Class of 2020 and six from the Class of 2021 up to $10,000 annually during their four years at Loyola. Mili Shah, Ph.D., associate professor of mathematics, will be the grant’s principal investigator.

 

NSF to Supercharge Research Computing Power at Loyola

 Four Loyola faculty members have been awarded a $280,120 grant from the National Science Foundation (NSF) to build a high-performance computing (HPC) cluster that will exponentially expand research opportunities for faculty and students across disciplines. Megan Olsen, Ph.D., assistant professor of computer science and principal investigator on the grant. Olsen’s co-awardees are Biggi Albrecht, Ph.D., associate professor of chemistry; David Binkley, Ph.D., professor of computer science; and Jeremy Schwartz, Ph.D., associate professor of economics.

env 

MADE CLEAR Grant Awarded to Loyola to Support Climate Change Education

 The goal of this grant is to create more expertise on campus and to empower faculty and administrators to develop their ability and confidence to incorporate climate change education into both course curricula and co-curricular learning experiences. Bernadette Roche, Ph.D., associate professor of biology and director of environmental studies will serve as the project Principal Investigator. Roche’s co-awardees are Elizabeth Dahl, Ph.D., associate professor of Chemistry, and Randall Jones, Ph.D., associate professor of physics.

 

Undergraduate Physics to Get Boost from NSF

Loyola has been awarded an $80,977 grant from the NSF for a collaborative project that will significantly enhance undergraduate physics education by developing, evaluating, and sharing methods to incorporate workforce-relevant skills and activities in the student experience. Bahram Roughani, Ph.D., is the associate dean for natural and applied sciences and the principal investigator on the grant.

 

Rivers Awarded NSF Grant to Create a Network to Prep Students for Careers in Biotechnology

Loyola biology professor David Rivers, Ph.D., won a $50,000 grant from NSF to create and lead the Mid-Atlantic Biology Research and Career (MABRC) network. This network consists of biotechnology educators and professionals from the public and private organizations across the mid-Atlantic region committed to preparing students for careers in biotechnology. The aim of the network is to help high school and college students gain the professional skills needed for a career in the growing science field of biotechnology.

 

Coalition of Baltimore-Area Colleges Win $750K Grant from Department of Justice

 Loyola, along with nine other Baltimore-area colleges and universities, have won a $750,000 grant from the U.S. Department of Justice. This grant is to generate new strategies to prevent, respond to, investigate, and hold offenders accountable for sexual assault and dating violence. It is also centered on creating a survivor-centered, trauma- informed approach to helping victims of sexual assault and dating violence. Katsura Kurita, J.D., assistant vice president for student development and Title IX deputy coordinator for students at Loyola will serve as project director.

Newsletter Archive

November 2015

September 2015

March 2015

January 2015

November 2014

September 2014

April 2014

November 2013

September 2013