Loyola University Maryland

Department of Fine Arts

Music

Music

Music at Loyola, Fall 2020

Dear Greyhounds,
 
Greetings from the Fine Arts Department! 

Are you interested in doing something music-related this semester? Whether you are thinking of majoring or minoring in music, looking for lessons or an ensemble to participate in, or simply interested in fulfilling your Core Fine Arts requirement, we have something to offer you! Here’s what you need to know about our program while we are studying remotely:

Academic program:
The Music program offers both a music major and a minor, but you don’t have to be degree-seeking to participate in ensembles, take private lessons, or classes. Each semester, full credit courses are offered in Performance, Music History and Music Theory for both the interested novice and more musically experienced student. More information about classes and majors can be found on our website: https://www.loyola.edu/academics/fine-arts/music 

Extra- and co-curricular activities:
As someone who is interested in music, one question may have crossed your mind: How can I be musically involved at Loyola and earn credits at the same time? 

We offer both vocal and instrumental ensembles, and private lessons, any of which are available to all Loyola students. Because the Fall semester is completely online, we are conducting these groups and offering private applied lessons via Zoom, Skype, or another videoconferencing platform. (More about lessons below.)

Ordinarily, we offer several ensembles: two vocal (University Singers and Repertory Choir), and five instrumental (Jazz Ensemble and Jazz Combo, Chamber Ensemble, Steel Pan ensemble, and Classical Guitar ensemble).  Because of the current situation, only University Singers (MU221) and the Jazz Ensemble (MU211) will be offered this Fall. Both ensembles are auditioned. Please contact Dr. Clay Price for information regarding University Singers (cprice1@loyola.edu); for the Jazz Ensemble, contact Mark St. Pierre (mastpierre@loyola.edu). If you are a more traditional/classical instrumentalist, although the Chamber Ensemble will not meet, director David LaVorgna (dlavorgna@loyola.edu) would like you to contact him. 

Ensembles can be taken for academic credit! One semester of an ensemble is 1.5 credits. Two semesters of an ensemble count as a 3-credit general elective for your course of study.

Private music lessons:
Private applied lessons are available in voice and most string, wind, and percussion instruments. (You will need to have access to an instrument to take lessons. If you don’t yet have one, our instructors can assist you in determining the best instrument for you.) All our applied faculty are professional performers on their respective instrument, and excellent teachers. There is an additional fee for taking one-on-one lessons: a 30-minute lesson is $300/semester; a 60-minute lesson is $600. 

Applied lessons can also be taken for academic credit: 1 credit/semester for a 30-minute lesson; 2 for a 60-minute lesson. 

Three things to remember: 
1. Lessons and ensembles can be added to your schedule during the first two weeks of the semester (Deadline: Friday 11 September). 
2. Lessons and Ensembles can be added on top of your 5-course load. You can register online or by calling Academic Advising (410.617.5050).
3. You can participate in any ensemble or private lesson even if you don’t want to take it for credit.

This is an unusual fall semester at Loyola, but I guarantee that, despite us being spread out, you will be able to build friendships this semester through an ensemble or applied studio. 

Best wishes on the new semester!
 
Loyola University Maryland Music Faculty

 
Natka Bianchini
Faculty

Natka Bianchini, Ph.D.

A professor of theatre, Dr. Bianchini helps students discover what ignites their passion

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