Loyola University Maryland

Philosophy Department

Upcoming Courses

Fall 2022 Upcoming Philosophy Courses

PL201 Foundations of Philosophy
A one semester introduction to philosophy. Three focal points are covered: the emergence and development of rational theories on the nature of reality (metaphysics); questions concerning the grounds for distinguishing between knowledge and opinion (epistemology); and the nature and status of values (ethical, aesthetic, religious, etc.). Special attention is paid to the origins of philosophy and its historical beginnings in the ancient world.

Perspectives

PL202 Project of Modernity
Examines distinctive aspects of the modern philosophical project as it relates to questions of science, politics, society, history, or morals. Philosophical theories ranging from the seventeenth through the twentieth centuries are treated in their historical development and/or their opposition to ancient teachings.

PL210 Politics and Society
Addresses the basis and goals of human society, including issues concerning the structure of the good community as balanced against the interests of the individual.

PL216 Asian Thought
An introduction to the philosophical and spiritual traditions of Asia, such as Hinduism, Buddhism, Confucianism, and Daoism. Comparisons with Western thought are explored.

PL228 Philosophy and Genocide
Examines the challenges that genocide poses for philosophy and what philosophy and philosophers might do to confront and even prevent genocide.
PL236 Environmental Philosophy
Explores the place of human beings within the much larger natural world and the fundamental conceptions of nature. Is nature savage, a resource for our use, or a mindless machine? Special topics may include animal consciousness, sustainability, indigenous cultures, global climate change and other ecological crises, and the effects of contemporary technologies.

Ethics

PL302 Ethics
Explores, both historically and topically, the basic questions about values and obligation, the social and individual influences on moral judgement, the application of general guidelines to particular situations, and the search for a personal moral life.

PL311 Bioethics
A study of the moral problems and uncertainties connected with biomedical research. Theoretical questions on the nature of morality and methodological foundations of science lead to a discussion of current topics, such as recombinant DNA, cloning, organ transplants, definitions of death, and death therapy.

PL314 Environmental Ethics
An investigation of the relationship between human beings and the natural world, with attention to the ethical dimensions of our life-style and environmental policies. Students explore their obligations to the nonhuman world and to future generations.

PL315 Ethics after Auschwitz
When philosopher Theodor Adorno wrote that “to write a poem after Auschwitz is barbaric,” it was a profound recognition that the Holocaust changed everything. This course explores ways in which philosophy might be implicated in the Holocaust and other genocides. It then turns to the failures of traditional philosophical ethics that we are forced to confront in the wake of the Holocaust. Finally, the course raises questions about the possibility of hope after Auschwitz.

Seminars

PL321 Cross-Cultural Philosophy
In today’s multicultural societies, with increasingly frequent cross-cultural interaction taking place on a global scale, there is greater need than ever for philosophical reflection on how cultures have interacted and should interact. This course examines major theories and debates regarding the ethics and politics of cross-cultural relations and the hermeneutics of cross-cultural dialogue.

PL333 Philosophy of Law
History is a central theme of philosophical inquiry. The study of the philosophy of history raises the question as to whether there is meaning in events over time and space, granting regularity and human freedom. Some key authors are Cicero, Augustine, Vico, Kent, Herder, Hegel, Marx, Dilthey, Ricoeur, and Danto, each of whom contributed to shaping the understanding of history.

PL352 Philosophy of Freedom
A philosophical and historical analysis of the multiple meanings and uses of the concept of freedom through text, literature, and film, including some cross-cultural exploration. What does the mythic land of freedom look like? Topics include emancipation and incarceration, political liberty and fascism, individual and collective rights, existential freedom, and Gaia.

PL355 Philosophy of History
History is a central theme of philosophical inquiry. The study of the philosophy of history raises the question as to whether there is meaning in events over time and space, granting regularity and human freedom. Some key authors are Cicero, Augustine, Vico, Kent, Herder, Hegel, Marx, Dilthey, Ricoeur, and Danto, each of whom contributed to shaping the understanding of history.

PL357 Philosophy of Literature
Literature gives concrete expression to our sense of reality and in its history “re-presents” the status of man and human events as each age presupposes it. Herein resides the intimate relationship which has always existed between literature and philosophy. The history of this relationship explains both the continuity and the discontinuity which is present in Western literature. Focuses on one (or more) special topics, such as tragedy, modernism, aesthetic theories of literature, and existentialism. Same as EN 357.

PL389 Nietzsche
Nietzsche is the first major figure in the history of philosophy to repudiate the tradition of Western thought that began with Plato. The nature of this repudiation and Nietzsche’s attempt to inaugurate a new mode of philosophical thinking are examined.

 

Sarah Haley
Alumni

Sarah Haley

Meet Sarah, a physician who calls upon her liberal arts education to build purposeful connections with her patients

Biochemistry, Philosophy