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Loyola students provide mentorship to youth involved in Elijah Cummings Youth Project and the Baltimore Jewish Council

| By Molly Robey
Mhret Alemu, ’22, Jamilla Battle, ’21, Amber Davis, ’22, Matthew Dorsey, ’21, Jayda Lawlah, ’21, Christian McNeill, ’22, Franklin Parks, ’21, and Kayte Rooney, ’21
Mhret Alemu, ’22, Jamilla Battle, ’21, Amber Davis, ’22, Matthew Dorsey, ’21, Jayda Lawlah, ’21, Christian McNeill, ’22, Franklin Parks, ’21, and Kayte Rooney, ’21

As a tribute to the late U.S. Congressman Elijah Cummings, the Baltimore Jewish Council and the Elijah Cummings Youth Project (ECYP) provided stipends to eight Loyola University Maryland students, who served as mentors to local high school students over the past year. This is the first year Loyola has participated in this initiative, which is aimed at inspiring interfaith communications among young adults in Baltimore.

A civil rights advocate and Democrat in the House of Representatives, Congressman Elijah Cummings served in Maryland’s 7th district from 1996 until his passing in 2019. 

“We want to be an anchor institution in Baltimore and build relationships that are positive and impactful for both Loyola and these high school students and the community,” said Rev. Scott Adams, assistant director of Campus Ministry. “I see this as a three-level mentorship opportunity for the Loyola students who will gain leadership experience, increase their networks, and build their résumés.”

The selected Loyola students are Mhret Alemu, ’22, Jamilla Battle, ’21, Amber Davis, ’22, Matthew Dorsey, ’21, Jayda Lawlah, ’21, Christian McNeill, ’22, Franklin Parks, ’21, and Kayte Rooney, ’21. 

“I believe having the opportunity to participate in this fellowship is a privilege,” said Parks, who is an accounting major from Bowie, Md. “This is an opportunity to continue Congressman Cummings’ legacy by helping high school student leaders reach their potential to be the change they want to see in the world.”

Over the past year, Loyola fellows provided high school students the opportunity to learn valuable leadership and professional development skills and helped the youth create an agenda for a Teen Summit—which had been scheduled for this month and may be held at a later date. In addition, the Loyola students attended monthly meetings with the youth and participated in development workshops at the University. 

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