Loyola University Maryland

Department of Computer Science

Undergraduate Student Research

The department has a strong tradition of undergraduate involvement in research projects with an excellent record of participation in publications – students have traveled as far as Ireland to present joint faculty/student work, and they helped write the software that cracked the Human Genome.   Students primarily work on research as either a senior research project, or as a summer Hauber researcher. The summer Hauber research students are paid a stipend and may live on campus. In both cases, students work closely with one or two faculty advisors to pursue novel research areas.

Research at Loyola

How to Get Involved

Students who are interested in a research experience should talk to a faculty member whose research matches their interests. Alternatively, students can talk to their computer science advisor about the research opportunities and how to get involved. The Hauber application deadline is usually in January or early February, and is competitive entry. Students should start thinking about if they'd like to apply to Hauber and research out to faculty by the end of the fall semester.  Students who are interested in a research project for their senior capstone project should being talking to faculty about this possibility by Thanksgiving.

Recent Student Research

  • 2022: Simulating Load Balancing on Distributed Systems. Senior Project student: Amanda Condron. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Megan Olsen.
  • 2021: Applying Machine Learning to Predict Agent-based Modeling Results. Hauber Fellow: Naylah Perodin. Faculty Mentor: Dr. Megan Olsen.
  • 2020: Testing for Deep Neural Networks in Autonomous Vehicles. Hauber Fellow: Jack Toohey. Faculty Mentors: Drs. Dave Binkley & M Raunak.
  • 2019: Testing Corner Cases in Machine Learning. Hauber Fellow: Victoria Matos. Faculty Mentors: Drs. Dave Binkley & M Raunak.
  • 2019: Segmented Testing of Machine Learning Models. Hauber Fellow: Jacob Norris. Faculty Mentors: Drs. Dave Binkley & Raunak.

Example Student Publications and Presentations

Many student research projects result in scientific publications and conference presentations. Here are a few examples, with the Loyola undergraduate student's name in bold:

  • L. Moonen, D. Binkley, and S. Pugh. On Adaptive Change Recommendation. Journal of Systems and Software special issue on Source Code Analysis and Manipulation. Jounal of Systems and Software, June 2020.
  • MS Raunak, R Kuhn, R Kogut, R Kacker. Vulnerability trends in web servers and browsers. Proceedings of the 7th Symposium on Hot Topics in the Science of Security, 2020.
  • C. Maalouf, M. Olsen, M. Raunak. Combinatorial Testing for Parameter Evaluation. Proceedings of the 2019 Winter Simulation Conference. December 2019.
  • M. Olsen, M. Raunak, M. Setteducati. Enabling quantified validation for model credibility. Proceedings of the Summer Simulation Multi-Conference (SummerSim'18). July 2018.
  • M. Olsen, J. Laspesa, T. Taylor-D'Ambrosio. On Genetic Algorithm Effectiveness for Finding Behaviors in Agent-based Predator Prey Models. Proceedings of the Summer Simulation Multi-Conference (SummerSim'18). July 2018.
  • D. Binkley, D. Heinz, D. Lawrie, and J. Overfelt. Source code analysis with LDA. Journal of Software: Evolution and Process, August 2016. Journal of Software: Evolution and Process, 2016.
  • D. Binkley, D. Lawrie and C. Uehlinger. Vocabulary Normalization Improves IR-Based Concept Location. In Proceedings of the 28th International Conference on Software Maintenance, 2012

Research Away from Loyola

In addition to research experiences at Loyola, students can also get involved in research at other universities over the summer. These programs are called Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU). They exist all around the country, and also usually include housing and a stipend. Deadlines vary, but are usually around winter break. You can see the entire list at the NSF REU Site Website.

Adam Phillippy
Alumni

Adam Phillippy

Adam’s human genome sequencing research landed him on TIME Magazine’s “The 100 Most Influential People of 2022” list

Computer Science