Loyola University Maryland

Center for the Humanities

Events

These are events sponsored wholly or in part by the Center for the Humanities.

SEPTEMBER

THURSDAY, SEPTEMBER 8

Odds Bodkin Performance
The Iliad, Book 1
Storyteller and musician Odds Bodkin returns to Loyola on Zoom to present THE ILIAD: BOOK I. Using a variety of intensely real characters with ongoing music, he brings to life the most famous argument in ancient history: Achilles, the greatest Greek warrior at Troy, against Agamemnon, the Lord Marshall, commander of all the armies.Achilles already despises Agamemnon for his greed and brutish ways, but when, during a confrontation over a captured Trojan girl, the Marshall threatens to send her home, only to replace her in his tent with a girl Achilles loves, the hate between them boils over. The rift threatens to sunder the Greek army and waste ten years of siege at Troy’s gates. With Apollo’s plague arrows wiping out their army, somebody has to give in. Meanwhile the Gods of Olympus, who started all this, are watching their favorite mortals fight.

Odds Bodkin has been called “one of the great voices in American storytelling” by Wired and “a consummate storyteller” by The New York Times. Loyola audiences have given Odds standing ovations for this performance in the past. Come see why. Experience Homer’s great story in a clear, accessible way. 

McGuire East
7:30 PM

If you require additional accommodations, please contact Disability Support Services at dss@loyola.edu.

WEDNESDAY, SEPTEMBER 21

Writers at Work Series
Tania James

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 30

CFH Annual Celebration of Teaching, Learning, and Research in the Humanities

Teaching Faculty Excellence Award presented to Ursula Sayers-Ward, Modern Languages and Literatures
Student Presentations from the CFH Summer Student Research Fellows, Summer Study Fellows, and Internships
Nachbahr Address by Martha Taylor, PhD, Classics
3:00 PM Fourth Floor Program Room

OCTOBER

Writers at Work Series

Modern Masters Reading Series

NOVEMBER

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5 TO SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13

NATIONAL FRENCH WEEK  -  FRENCH GASTRONOMY, HON!

SATURDAY, NOVEMBER 5
Student quiche-making competition
12:00 PM

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 6
Dinner at Petit Louis Bistro. The Maitre D’, Patrick De Valle, will give a short talk about the restaurant history, the selection of dishes and the cooking process.

MONDAY, NOVEMBER 7
Presentation by Dr. André Colombat, entitled “Haute Cuisine: great chef.fes”. Dr Colombat will talk about what that expression means for French people and will present great chefs, in particular those in his hometown of Lyon. He will also speak about women cheffes and Anthony Bourdain’s love of French cuisine. At the talk, there will be a table set up with various cheeses, such as Roquefort, Brie, Comté and goat cheeses some made locally. In France, “pain, vin, fromage” is one of the very favorite food combinations that endures.
7:00 PM
Fourth Floor Program Room

WEDNESDAY, NOVEMBER 9
Patisserie Poupon will send a chef to present and talk about all the different pastries sold at their store and teach students how to make macarons. In reports about self-selected cultural activities, students often report choosing to make French specialties, sometimes as intricate as baguettes and macarons. We believe this presentation will greatly appeal to our students. And of course, there will be a selection for students to enjoy and some to purchase. 

THURSDAY, NOVEMBER 10
Film Presentation tbd.

During the entire week from November 5 to November 12, French club members will offer students “crêpes” made on the spot and teach those interested about crêpe-making. 
There will be an exhibit of media, books about French gastronomy and typical French cooking tools, such as escargots dishes, coquilles St. Jacques, moules à madeleine, etc. at the LNDL library.  

SUNDAY, NOVEMBER 13
Rev. John Conley, S.J. will conduct a bilingual mass in French and English in the Alumni Memorial Chapel. We will encourage French students to participate in the mass either by reading scripture passages in French or by performing music in French. A student sacristan and a cantor and organist will be hired.  After mass, there will be a traditional “goûter,” the café au lait, chocolate milk, and cookies, viennoiseries enjoyed by millions of French children every day. 


 

DECEMBER

WEDNESDAY

JANUARY

TUESDAY, JANUARY

FEBRUARY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY

THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 

Modern Masters Reading Series

MARCH

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 15 and THURSDAY, MARCH 16

Student-Faculty Colloquia for the 2023 Humanities Symposium
Julie Otsuka's When the Emperor was Divine 
Two days during the official Symposium week are set aside for Loyola student/faculty colloquia. During each scheduled class period, faculty and their classes will meet with faculty and students from other classes. These colloquia have traditionally been led by panels composed of faculty members from different disciplines who lead informal discussion, posing questions to stimulate the participation of students, and to engage the Symposium text across narrow disciplinary boundaries. This year’s text is When the Emperor was Divine by Julie Otsuka.

The colloquia will be in-person. They are open to Loyola faculty, staff, and students. Registration is required.

THURSDAY, MARCH 16
LOYOLA'S 2023 HUMANITIES SYMPOSIUM KEYNOTE ADDRESS 

Julie Otsuka
Award-winning novelist, Julie Otsuka, will deliver the 2023 Humanities Symposium keynote address.
Julie Otsuka was born and raised in California and is a recipient of awoman sitting on a park bench Guggenheim Fellowship. Her first novel, When the Emperor Was Divine (Knopf) is this year's Humanities Symposium text. This novel, set during World War II, follows a Japanese-American family from their home in Berkeley, California to internment camps in the Utah desert. Otsuka draws on historical research as well as her own family's history to create a spare and imagistic novel told in an inventive style. The novel won the 2003 Asian American Literary Award and the 2003 American Library Association Alex Award. Her second novel, The Buddha in the Attic (Knopf) was a finalist for the National Book Award 2011, won the 2012 PEN/Faulkner Award for Fiction and the 2011 Langum Prize in American Historical Fiction. The Buddha in the Attic was an international bestseller and the winner of the prestigious Prix Femina étranger 2012, and the Albatros Literaturpreis 2013. Otsuka's third novel, The Swimmers, was published by Knopf in 2022. Photo credit: Jean-Luc Bertini.


McGuire Hall, 6:30 PM.

APRIL

WEDNESDAY, APRIL

2023 Hanna Geldrich-Leffman Colloquium on Language, Literature, and Society:

MAY



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