Loyola University Maryland

The Office of Academic Affairs

Promotions

Loyola celebrates the attainments of its faculty members who were recently tenured and/or promoted, one of the most important career milestones in a faculty member's career.

During the 2019-20 academic year, 13 Loyola faculty members were tenured and/or promoted. Their accomplishments will continue to strengthen student learning experiences, and their scholarly contributions will continue to enrich human and universal understanding and experience.

The profiles of these distinguished faculty members, which follow, describe the faculty members' areas of expertise and give insight into their most significant and rewarding career dimensions.

Heidi Brown, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Modern Languages and Literatures

Research Interests

My research focuses on representations of psychological trauma in 20th century French and Francophone literature. In particular, I study narratives written by those who  have experienced a fragmentation, breakdown, and death of self due to the extreme trauma caused by genocide or torture.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • FR331 “Savoring Francophone Literature” 
  • FR332 “Trauma and Testimony: Representations of the 1994 Genocide in Rwanda”
  • FR380 “The Algerian War: 1954-1962”

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “Mort-Vivant: Physical, Psychological, Social, and Spiritual Death in Génocidé by Révérien Rurangwa” French Studies (forthcoming). 
  • Brown, Heidi. "Trauma, Language, and Literature: Psycholinguistic Dynamics in Georges-Arthur Goldschmidt's Autobiographical Writing in Response to World War II." French Forum (forthcoming). 
  • Brown, Heidi. “From Sensation to Representation: The Torture of Djamila Boupacha during the Algerian War.” Women in French 26 (2018): 83-95. 

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Peace and Justice Committee (Fall 2017-present) 
  • National Fellowships Committee (Fall 2016-present) 
  • BridgeKids volunteer and teaching coach (June 2017-present) 

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Summer Research Grant, Loyola University Maryland (2016)

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Connections with students have profoundly impacted me as a teacher, a researcher, and a person. I love the sense of community that develops in class as we learn and grow together. I carry with me deeper conversations that I have had with students during office hours. I am deeply grateful for the retreats led by campus ministry, as they have been life-changing experiences for me. 

Martin Camper, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Writing

Research Interests

Rhetorical theory, argumentation theory, history of rhetoric, rhetoric of religion

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • WR220: Introduction to Rhetoric
  • HN210: Eloquentia Perfecta

Recent Noteworthy Publications/Presentations

  • Arguing over Texts: The Rhetoric of Interpretation. Oxford University Press, 2018.
  • “Enthymematic Free Space: The Efficacy of Anti-Stop-and-Frisk Arguments in the Face of Racial Prejudice.” Argumentation and Advocacy, vol. 55, no. 4, 2019, pp. 259-281. With Zach Fechter.
    “Revision and Reflection: A Study of (Dis)Connections between Writing Knowledge and Writing Practice.” College Composition and Communication, vol. 69, no. 4, 2018, pp. 581-611. With Heather Lindenman, Lindsay Dunne Jacoby, and Jessica Enoch.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Faculty moderator of the Loyola Rhetoric Society
  • Engagement with the Baltimore Urban Debate League

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Summer Stipend for How the Bible’s Meaning Changes: Argument and Controversy in the Christian Church, National Endowment for the Humanities. March 2017. 
  • Research Fellowship for How the Bible’s Meaning Changes: Argument and Controversy in the Christian Church, International Society for the History of Rhetoric. January 2017. 

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Loyola fosters an atmosphere of holism, where one’s scholarship, teaching, and service are interwoven, such that they feed into and enrich each other. This holistic approach flows from Loyola’s value of cura personalis, which permeates the campus community. I appreciate this kind of integration, and I believe I am a better teacher-scholar-citizen for it.

Daniel Castillo, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Theology

Research Interests

The nexus of liberation theology and environmental ethics.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Violence and Holiness in 20th-Century El Salvador
  • Liberation Theology
  • Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation

Recent Noteworthy Publications/Presentations

  • An Ecological Theology of Liberation: Salvation and Political Ecology, with Foreword by Gustavo Gutiérre (Maryknoll: Orbis Books, 2019)
  • “Integral Ecology as a Liberation Concept,” Theological Studies 77.2 (2016): 353-376.
  • “Prophetic Mourning, Lament, and the Ecologic l Crisis” in Our Fragile Earth, ed. William T. Cavanaugh (Eugene: Cascade, 2018), 151–162.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Member of the Committee of Catholic Social Thought
  • I’ve accompanied students to the Ignatian Family Teach-In for Justice on multiple occasions.
  • In conjunction with Campus Ministry, I organized a day of reflection on the witness of St. Óscar Romero.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Louisville Institute First Book Grant 2017-2018;
  • Louisville Institute Sabbatical Grant 2020–2021
  • Peace and Justice Studies Course Development Grants (2015 and 2019)

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Throughout my time at Loyola, I’ve been immensely and increasingly grateful to work at an institution that supports my commitments to the preferential options for the earth and poor (arising out of my faith in Christ). This support has come in multiple ways: financial support for my scholarship; course development grants to construct courses such as “Justice, Peace, and the Integrity of Creation;” and collegial support from peers both within and outside my department who have overlapping interest and have graciously given their time in conversation and proofreading. I’ve greatly enjoyed working with the students as well!

Marian Crotty, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Writing

Research Interests

Creative Writing (Fiction and Nonfiction)

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Special Topic in Creative Writing (Reading Like a Writer)
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  •  “Halloween,” Crazyhorse, No. 96, 108-117. (Fall 2019)
  • “We Need to Start Taking Young Women’s Love Stories Seriously,” Electric Literature, February 13, 2018
  • What Counts as Love, University of Iowa Press, October 2017

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Writers at Work Series, cofounder and co-chair 
  • Assistant Editor, The Common

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Janet Heidinger Kafka Prize

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Loyola is a place where people are encouraged to think deeply and engage with the larger world. My students and colleagues challenge me to push myself intellectually and to grow as a person. I feel fortunate to have found a university where I am surrounded by talented people who seek to make a positive impact on the world.

Christopher Higginson, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Psychology

Research Interests

My research interests are the cognitive deficits associated with Parkinson’s disease, the degree to which psychological tests predict functioning in the real world, and the relation between gait, balance, and cognition.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • PY814 Biological Bases of Behavior
  • PY925 Clinical Applications Assessment
  • PY332 Introduction to Human Neuropsychology

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • (*Student) Higginson, C. I., Thompson, T., *Benjamin, A. E., *Rosales, A. C., *Zane, K. L., *Valenti, M.,…*Chaffee, T. A. (2017). Construct validity of the Functional Assessment of Verbal Reasoning and Executive Strategies (FAVRES). Brain Injury, 31, 1807-1812. https://doi.org/10.1080/02699052.2017.1347278

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Director, Master’s Education – Practitioner Track, Department of Psychology

What is Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

What I enjoy about my work is the variety of activities in which I engage. In the classroom, I instruct both undergraduate and graduate students. In the lab, I pursue my research interests with students and colleagues. At the Loyola Clinical Centers, I assist doctoral students in their provision of psychological services to underserved members of the community. What is most significant to me about Loyola is the people. The University is composed of individuals who are not only bright, but also caring and generous, a combination of traits that is exceedingly rare in my opinion.  

Janine Holc, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Political Science

Research Interests

I study how individuals and communities experience political oppression, wartime violence, and democratization, with a focus on the past and present regions of Central Europe. My next project asks how German children and youth experienced the British occupation of Germany right after World War II, and how British goals of denazification came into conflict with the reality of children’s lives.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • PS 101, Politics, is my absolute favorite because I get a chance to teach first year students.
  • PS 364, “International Politics Through Non-Western Lenses”
  • PS 307, “Global Politics of Migration.”

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • My first book, "The Politics of Trauma and Memory Activism: Polish-Jewish Relations Today," was published in 2017.
  • “Anti-Semitism, Against and Beyond.” Slavic Review 78 (2) (2019): 506-513.
  • “Polin, The Museum of the History of Polish Jews.” American Historical Review 123 (4) (2018): 1267-69. 
  • “The Polish-Lithuanian Borderlands, Past and Present: Multicultural versus Decolonial Responses to Local and State Violence.” Nationalities Papers 46 (4) (2018): 654-670.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Global Studies Director
  • Innovation Task Force
  • Loyola Conference

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Loyola Peace and Justice Studies Grant
  • Visiting Fellowship, The United States Holocaust Memorial Museum

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

By far the most rewarding part about teaching at Loyola is the enthusiasm and openness of the students. Their receptivity to new ideas, pedagogies and challenges is always an inspiration to me. Their attitude helps me remain open and receptive as well, so that I am learning along with them. They share with me what their other professors and instructors are doing, and I know I am lucky to be part of such a talented and committed fellowship.

Nune Hovhannisyan, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Economics

Research Interests

My research on international and development economics focuses specifically on the channels and modes of international knowledge transfer and analyzes cross-border flows of goods, ideas and people.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Business Statistics
  • International Trade
  • Managerial Economics for MBA

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “International Business Travel: An Engine of Innovation?” (with Wolfgang Keller), Journal of Economic Growth, March 2015, Volume 20, Issue 1, pp. 75-104
  • “Using Panel VAR to Analyze International Knowledge Spillovers”, (with Norman Sedgley), Review of International Economics, November 2019, Volume 27, Issue 5, pp. 1633-1660
  • “Technology Gap and International Knowledge Transfer: New Evidence from the Operations of Multinational Corporations”, Eastern Economic Journal, October 2019, Volume 45, Issue 4, pp. 612-638

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Loyola University Maryland
  • Committee on the Assessment of Student Learning 
  • Academic Senate 
  • Sellinger Curriculum Committee

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

I feel fortunate to work in an environment where I am constantly motivated and inspired by my colleagues, and where I am energized by the dedication and hard work of my students. In my time here, I have seen how my ever-evolving teaching methodology can help students acquire their intellectual skills, fuel their curiosity, and extend their knowledge.  Working alongside colleagues who are active scholars in their respective fields and being motivated by the intellectual rigor and supportive environment of our department, I have developed into a recognized scholar in the field of international economics, making high-quality contributions with impact.

Patricia Kanashiro, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Management and International Business

Research Interests

Corporate sustainability, defined as the “triple bottom line” (people, planet, and profits), has always been my personal and professional interest. I have three main areas of research: sustainability strategy, sustainability in management education, and sustainability theory building. I am grateful for the opportunity to be able to develop my research at Loyola in the spirit of the Jesuit values of magis and women and men for and with others. Moreover, my research attempts to address some of the environmental concerns laid out by Pope Francis in his encyclical letter Laudato Si

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • I appreciate teaching the Business school capstone courses - GB 709 Strategic Management (graduate) and MG 402 Business Policy (undergraduate) - and help students integrate and augment materials from previous courses.
  • In my IB 282 International Business, students appreciate a wide diversity of political, economic, and social issues as they understand the role of business in global and local contexts. I enjoy engaging my students in provocative dialogue as they challenge their own and each other assumptions.

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Kanashiro, P. Can environmental governance lower toxic emissions? A panel study of U.S. high-polluting industries. Business Strategy and the Environment (forthcoming)(IF: 6.4)
  • Kanashiro, P. & Rivera, J. 2019. “Do chief sustainability officers make companies greener? The moderating role of regulatory pressures.” Journal of Business Ethics, 155(3): 687-701. (IF: 3.8, Financial Times 50)
  • Starik, M., Kanashiro, P., & Collins, E. 2017. “Sustainability management textbooks: Potentially necessary but probably not sufficient.” Academy of Management Learning & Education, 16(3): 503-506. (IF: 3.3)

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • I am hopeful that Loyola will offer a new BBA in Sustainability Management in Fall 2020. As a lead proponent, I conducted an extensive search of other similar programs in the region and in the country for benchmarking purposes, consulted with experts in the field of Sustainability in Management Education, consulted the Loyola Incubation program team, and engaged with my department and school colleagues.
  • Second, I serve as a co-chair of the Committee on Enhancement of Teaching and Learning (CETL). In my role, I foster collaboration between this and other committees, work with the Office of Academic Affairs to coordinate teaching-related activities, and lead the planning and delivery of the Teaching Enhancement Workshops (TEW).
  • Third, I am an engaged member of my professional society, Academy of Management, Organization and the Natural Environment (ONE) division. I received an Outstanding Service Award in 2016 in recognition of my innovative and strategic approach to raising funds for the ONE division as the appointed treasurer (2014-2016). I also received a Best Reviewer Award in 2015.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • 2019-2020: Loyola University Maryland: High-Impact Practices Faculty Fellow (one of six faculty selected, $2,000)
  • 2019: Loyola University Maryland: Service-Learning Faculty Fellow (one-course release in AY 2020-2021)
  • 2018: Loyola University Maryland: Summer Research Award ($4,000)

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

I truly cherish my experience as an advisor and mentor to Loyola students as I strive to support their personal and career aspirations. In particular, minority students feel especially comfortable seeking personal advice, as they identify me as a minority faculty (both Asian and Latina). I am honored to gain their trust and confidence but recognize that I must continue developing the tools and knowledge to deal with difficult situations, especially related to mental health and family circumstances.

Marie Kerins, Ed.D.

Promoted

Professor of Speech-Language-Hearing Sciences

Research Interests

My primary area of interest focuses on language and literacy interventions for school-age children and the impact of interprofessional education and collaborative practice on language and learning with diverse populations.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Introduction to Communication Disorders
  • Language and Literacy Disorders in School Age Children
  • Research Design and Methods

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Ludwig, D. & Kerins, M.R. (2019). Interprofessional education: Application of interprofessional education collaborative core competencies to school settings, Perspectives of the ASHA Special Interest Groups: 2, 4 (2) 269-274. https://doi.org/10.1044/2018_PERS-SIG2-2018-0009
  • Kerins, M.R. (2018). Promoting interprofessional practice in schools. Asha Leader, 23 (12) 32-33. https://doi.org/10.1044/leader.SCM.23122018.32
  • Kerins, M.R. (2015) Communication Disorders Concomitant with Emotional and Behavioral Disorders, In Kerins, M.R.(Ed). Child and Adolescent Disorders: Organic and Neurogenic Bases, Plural Publishing, San Diego, CA.

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

My most significant service to Loyola was instituting the Office of Digital Teaching and Learning (ODTL) in conjunction with Academic Affairs. The office of ODTL was a significant step for Loyola supporting the 21st century learner by offering training in technology infused courses with personal attention from instructional designers for the creation of online and hybrid courses. Additionally, I am proud of my work as co-chair of the Vision for Graduate Education which contributed to the last strategic plan. As an Associate VP in Academic Affairs I worked on policy that provided parity across schools and across departments in both academic standards and distribution of scholarship dollars.

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Kerins, M.R. (2018, Summer). Interprofessional Education and Interprofessional Practice: Perceptions and Behaviors among School-Based Professionals. Funded by Loyola University Maryland.
  • Kerins, M.R. (2014, Summer) An Interdisciplinary Literacy Approach for At-Risk Pre-school Children Funded by Loyola University Maryland.
  • Kerins, M.R. (2012). MHEC Health Personnel Shortage Incentive Program grant. Funded by Maryland Higher Education Commission. Award: $21,600.

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

My most rewarding work at Loyola has been the direct interaction with the students, both undergraduate and graduate. I have thoroughly enjoyed teaching, mentoring, conducting research, advising and talking to the students. Grounded in the ideals of St. Ignatius Loyola, I have grown in my own formation as a person and Ignatian Citizen. I have been able to use that lens when considering interaction with colleagues and students, when developing learning objectives and activities, and when visualizing the future and mission of the University.

Leah Saal, Ph.D.

Tenured and Promoted

Associate Professor of Teacher Education

Research Interests

Saal’s engaged scholarly agenda focuses on the intersectionality of literacy and social justice. Her research includes two dovetailing strands: 1) the literacies of adults and older students in and out of educational programs and 2) the preparation and support of literacy leaders to work for social justice.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Literacy Assessment (2 course sequence)
  • Language, Literacy, and Culture

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Saal, L. K., & Gomez, M. (2020). A lens on adults’ literacies: Using photovoice as multimodal curriculum. Journal of Adolescent & Adult Literacy, 63(4), 467-471.
  • Saal, L. K., Sulentic Dowell, M. M., & Meidl, T. D. (2019) Ethics of access: Provocative impacts of K-12 service-learning and community engagement policy. International Journal of Research on Service-Learning and Community Engagement, 7(1), 1-19.
  • Saal, L. K., Yamashita, T., Shaw, D. J., & Perry, K. (2019). An exploration of U.S. adults’ information processing skills and political efficacy. Journal of Adult and Continuing Education. Advance online publication. doi: 10.1177/1477971419852750

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Co-Director of Literacy Programs
  • Engaged Scholar at South Baltimore Learning Center
  • Serve on editorial review board of several international and national journals for adult literacy

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Schoenbrodt, L., & Saal, L. K., Horizon Foundation Changemaker Challenge, Project STEER: Strategic training for empathic emergency response. November, 2019 [10,000.00].
  • Schoenbrodt, L., & Saal, L. K., (PIs) , LEADing forward: Training self-advocate educators for first responders. October, 2019 [$99,912.00].
  • Schoenbrodt, L., & Saal, L. K., (PIs) Maryland Department of Disabilities/Ethan Saylor Alliance, Learning to LEAD:

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

As an engaged scholar dedicated to issues of literacy and social justice, Loyola has provided a fertile environment to expand my practice as a researcher while tangibly supporting my partnerships with the Baltimore and Maryland communities. I came to Loyola because I believed this was a place where my contributions to student development, engaged scholarship, and collaborations as an active university citizen would be aligned to the Ignatian values of the university – social justice, community, and service. In my time here, this belief has been significantly reinforced by supportive colleagues and administration for whom I am incalculably grateful.

Jane Satterfield, MFA

Promoted

Professor of Writing

Research Interests

Contemporary American and British Poetry, Contemporary Essay, Crisis Memoir, Short form
creative writing, Apocalyptic Literature

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • Special Topics in Creative Writing: Memoirs of Crisis (WR385)
  • Biography and Autobiography (WR352)
  • Introduction to Creative Nonfiction (WR200)

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Apocalypse Mix [poems]. (Autumn House Press, 2017).
  • Borderlands and Crossroads: Writing the Motherland. (Demeter Press, 2016). [a multigenre
    creative writing anthology co-edited with Laurie Kruk].
  • Her Familiars [poems]. (Elixir Press, 2013).

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Director, Humanities Symposium
  • Steering Committee for the Peace and Justice Studies Program
  • Poet-in-residence, Salisbury Poetry Week, 2019

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Ledbury Festival Poetry Prize, 2015.
  • 49th Parallel Poetry Prize, Bellingham Review, 2014.
  • National Endowment for the Arts Fellowship in Literature, 2007.

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

I’ve always loved the interdisciplinary exchange among faculty at Loyola—from readings and lectures where we gather to celebrate our shared commitment to inquiry, to the quiet conversations shared in hallways on the way to class—all signs of enduring intellectual enthusiasm. I’m deeply grateful for the companionship of colleagues who model impassioned curiosity, generosity of spirit, and a fierce optimism that the liberal arts have the power to transform lives on our campus and beyond.

Yoon Shin, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Finance

Research Interests

My research areas are credit risk of fixed income securities and corporate governance. For example, I examined the role and influence of credit rating agencies such as Moody’s and S&P and the relationship between corporate governance and the cost of debt.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • GB/FI822 Fixed Income Securities
  • FI380 Fixed Income Securities: Valuation & Markets
  • GB/FI726 International Finance

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • “The Evolving Nature of Japanese Corporate Governance: Guaranteed Bonds vs. Rated Bonds,” Co-authored with S. Han and M. Pagano, January 2019, Journal of International Financial Markets, Institutions & Money 58, pp. 162-183
  • “Influence of Global vs. Local Rating Agencies to Japanese Financial Firms,”,” Co-authored with S. Han and W. Reinhart, 2018, Journal of Asian Finance, Economics and Business 5 (4), pp. 9-20
  • “Assessment of Credit Risk Models on Rule 144A Corporate Bonds,” Co-authored with M. Johnson and K. Leggio, Fall 2018, The Journal of Fixed Income 28 (2), pp. 65-83

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Founder and Faculty Moderator, Loyola Fixed Income Society (2015-present)
  • Member (SSBM Representative), Board on Rank and Tenure (2016-2019)
  • Founder and Program Committee Chair: 2019 and 2018 Baltimore Area Finance Conference

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • “Performance of Credit Ratings vs. Market-Based Merton Credit Risk Models: Two Essays,” 2018-2020, Travelers Professorship Research Grant, The Sellinger School of Business and Management, Loyola University Maryland
  • “The Impact of Split Ratings between Local and Global Credit Rating Agencies in Japan,” 2017 Senior Sabbatical Research Grant, Loyola University Maryland 
  • “Home Bias in Capital Structure Decisions by Credit Rating Changes,” 2017 Summer Research Grant, Loyola University Maryland

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Since joining Loyola, I have done my best to transform students and myself into a whole person with character and competence following Romans 12:2 (“Do not conform to the pattern of this world, but be transformed by the renewing of your mind”).  I interpret Romans 12:2 as follows: “we are responsible for learning not only everlasting values such as integrity, honesty, righteousness, compassion, fellowship, and commitment, but also about changing times such as new technology, skills, and knowledge.” I not only included it in my undergraduate syllabus but also adopted it as my teaching, research, and service philosophy.  I am grateful to those Jesuits’ values, which have propelled me to upgrade myself constantly.

Qiyu (Jason) Zhang, Ph.D.

Promoted

Professor of Marketing

Research Interests

I am interested in product/service development in both consumer and business markets with an emphasis placed on quantifying various effects of strategic marketing efforts.

Favorite Courses Taught at Loyola

  • GB702 Marketing Strategy (professional MBA core)
  • GB749 Customer Experience Management: Disney Study Tour (PMBA elective)
  • XM746 Marketing Management (executive MBA core)

Recent/Noteworthy Publications or Presentations

  • Dou, Xinhua, Xiajing Zhu, Jason Q. Zhang, and Jie Wang (2019), “Outcomes of Entrepreneurship Education in China: A Customer Experience Management Perspective,” Journal of Business Research, 103(1), 338-347. 
  • Athaide, Gerard A., Jason Q. Zhang, and Richard R. Klink (2019), “Buyer Relationships When Developing New Products: A Contingency Model,” Journal of Business & Industrial Marketing, 34(2), 426-438. 
  • Zhang, Jason Q., Hong Zhu, and Hung-bin Ding (2013) “Board Composition and Corporate Social Responsibility: An Empirical Investigation in the Post Sarbanes-Oxley Era,” Journal of Business Ethics, 114(3), 381-392. 

Most Significant Service to Loyola, Your Professional, and/or Baltimore Community

  • Chair, the Research & Sabbatical Committee, Loyola University Maryland 
  • Chair, the Curriculum Committee, the Sellinger School of Business
  • Chair, the Department of Marketing

Grants/Fellowships Awarded

  • Loyola University Summer Research Grant, 2013, 2014
  • Sellinger School Summer Research Grant, 2018

What is Most Significant or Rewarding about Loyola

Loyola’s Jesuit identity provides me with an ideal setting to develop both professionally and personally. The emphasis placed on academic excellence fosters an environment that values both teaching and research. The supporting resources (e.g., regular teaching workshops on campus and research presentations at the Sellinger School) encourage the best teaching and research possible. Collaborative colleagues, dedicated administrators and staff, and appreciative students create a welcoming and caring community within which I find my work rewarding and fulfilling.

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